Bago Things to Do

  • Kyaik Pun Paya
    Kyaik Pun Paya
    by prikje
  • Kyaik Pun Paya
    Kyaik Pun Paya
    by prikje
  • Kyaik Pun Paya
    Kyaik Pun Paya
    by prikje

Most Recent Things to Do in Bago

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    3 pagodas and an orphanage !

    by WStat Updated Jul 4, 2007

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    Preparing lunch in the orphanage
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    Bago is one of the major (#4 in Myanmar) cities in Burma,also known under her former name "Pegu".You have to pass Pegu /Bago on the way from Kayktio to Yangon, where you can also visit an impressive cashew nut plantation and the nearby Buddhist boys and girls orphanage (very much to be recommended !) and also a rubber tree plantation. In Bago there is an interesting Market with varieties of vegetables, flower and commodity goods. Above all, there are 3 pagodas to be visited:, the Shwethalyaung Pagoda (Reclining Buddha), the Shwemawdaw Pagoda and the Hintha Gon Pagoda, the place where Bago was founded.

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    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Kha Khat Wain Monastery: Socializing with monks

    by hydronetta Written Feb 8, 2007

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    After watching the studying session, visiting the kitchen we were taken to a dormitory where novice monks were settling. We had the chance to have a nice chat though struggling with problems in language communication. But still they were smiling and very happy to interact with foreigners.
    It was a fine experience and very important things were understood: being novice monks didn't necessarily mean that they had given up everything. They loved to talk and read about Manchester United (!!), they were very interested in LP guidebook. But above all was a poster of a western girl in hot shorts and wet T-shirt in their room!!!!!
    Leaving the dormitory we saw some young monks having their shower just before lunch. Another one was feeding young puppies adopted by the monastery.

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Kha Khat Waing monastery: cooking for monks

    by hydronetta Written Feb 8, 2007

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    Our next stop was at the monastery's kitchen where we witnessed how food is cooked for such big number of monks living there.
    Not only monks are cooking but they are escorted by civilians as well.
    No electricity is used but the huge cooking pots are put on fire. Hygiene is questionable though.

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Kha Khat Waing monastery: Lessons

    by hydronetta Written Feb 8, 2007

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    We arrived at the monastery around 10:30am after catching the bus at 8am from Yangon bus station. As soon as we got off we were approached by a dozen of taxi or even motorcycle drivers wishing to tour us around. Negotiate and choose whoever speaks better english and has the best vehicle.
    Our drivers took us first here and we were lucky enough to see all novice monks in their class having their lesson. What is amazing is that their classes lack desks. The novice monks line on the ground and they seemed quite devoted to their studies as very few were interrrupted by our presence. Very inspiring were when they were repeating their lesson all in one voice!

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Kha Khat Wain Kyaung (monastery)

    by hydronetta Written Feb 8, 2007

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    Perfect place to soak up the atmosphere of a monastery is to visit Bago's Kha Khat Wain Kyaung. Less touristy than the similar in Amarapura, it is the best place to socialize with monks who are more than happy to practice their english language skills.
    Try to arrive there before their lunch time at 11 am.

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Shwemawdaw Pagoda

    by hydronetta Written Jan 18, 2007

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    The Shwemawdaw or 'Great Golden God Pagoda' of Bago is one of the oldest pagodas in Bago: it is said to be more than thousand years old. Originally built to a height of 23 meters in the 8th century, was rebuilt higher several times (usually following great earthquakes) until it finally reached its present 114 meter stature in 1954. Legends say that enshrined beneath the towering pagoda are the hairs and teeth of the Buddha. Because of these relics, Shwemawdaw is visited by throngs of Buddhist pilgrims during all hours of the day and night.
    Like the Shwedagon pagoda in Yangon, the stupa is reached by covered walkway lined by stalls though not as densely as its counterpart in the capital.
    An interesting detail is found in the gigantic chinthe (half lion/half dragon guardian beast) at the western entrance in whose mouth there are small figures: the monk Shin Upagok (left) with one hand in his begging bowl and looking up to heaven and Shin Thiwali (right)
    Another interesting feature is a part of the old brick pagoda that has fallen of the main structure during the latest earthquake.

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Huge reclining Buddha

    by hydronetta Written Jan 4, 2007

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    A bit off Bago's centre you'll be guided to one of the town's major sights: The Shwe-tha-lyaung Buddha statue.
    This huge reclining statue is considered as one of the finest of its kind. This is due to Buddha's face who despite is lying in death position has a gentle expression showing that he had gained the highest level of Nirvana.
    The dimensions are really impressive: it is 55m long and 16m high. Some parts of the body are interesting to mention their dimensions: ear=4.5m, little finger=3m, big toe=1.8m
    The statue is thought to date from 10th century and it was restored in the 15th century. In british colonial times it was abandoned in the jungle and rediscovered in 1881. Soon after it was restored back again and placed for worship.

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Un Buda en la boca-A Bhuda on the mouth

    by elpariente Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    Cabeza de chinthe
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    Shwemawdaw Paya

    Este temlo de 114m de altura domina toda la ciudad
    Tiene más de 1000 años y alberga un diente y dos pelos de Buda.
    Ha sufrido bastante en varios temblores de tierra pero durante los años lo han ido reconstruyendo
    En la boca de los "Chinthe" que son las bestias que guardan el templo y son medio leon y medio dragon se alojan 2 Budas Mahayanas
    This temple has 114 m high and it is over all the town
    It has more than 1000 years and it keeps two Buddha hairs and one tooth
    it has suffered a lot on several earthquakes but during the years they have rebuilt it
    In the mouth of the "Chinte" , are the beasts that guard the temple and are half Lyon and half dragon are located two Buddhas

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    El refertorio- The refectory

    by elpariente Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    Refertorio 1
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    Kha Khat Wain Kyaung

    Una vez que se tiene el arroz se pasa alrefertorio donde tienen las mesas, el te y el resto de comida para comer mezclandolo en el cuenco de arroz.
    No faltan las chocolatinas en las mesas

    Once the monks have the rice they go to the refectory where they have the tables , the tea and the rest of the food to eat all mixing on their rice bowl
    Chocolates are not missing on their tables

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    La espera-Waiting

    by elpariente Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    La cola
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    Kha Khat Wain Kyaung

    Para llegar a los pucheros de arroz hay que esperar y hacer colas
    Los monjes salen de sus habitaciones y se dirigen en fila con su cuenco bajo el brazo a recibir su ración de arroz

    to reach the rice tanks it is necessary to wait and to make long lines
    The monks leave their rooms and they make a line with their bowl under their arm to get their rice portion

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    El reparto - The distribution

    by elpariente Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    Listos para empezar
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    En el monasterio de viven más de 1000 monjes que a las 10h 30m comen arroz y otras cosas que les han dado los fieles por la mañana
    El arroz esta en 4 peroles y los monjes les ponen sus raciones en los cuencos para que luego vayan a comer al refertorio

    in the monastery of Kha Khat Wain Kyaung are living more than 1000 monks that at 10h 30m they eat rice and anotherthings that the people has given them as alms
    The rice is in four big tanks and some monks put their part to the other monks in the bowls that they go to eat in the refectory

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Los cuatro Budas The Four Bhudas

    by elpariente Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    Kyaik Pun-reoque
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    En Kyaik Pun Paya tiene cuatro Budas sentados , dandose la espalda, de 30 metros de altura cada uno y orientados mirando a los cuatro puntos cardinales
    Cuatro hermanas Mon estan relacionadas con su construccion y se decia que si alguna se casaba se caeria un Buda.
    Por lo que sea ,en el terremoto de 1930 se destruyo uno de los Budas ( en esta epoca ya tendrian 454 anos las hermanas Mon????)

    In Kyaik Pun Paya they have four seated Bhudas, back to back, of 30 meters height each and looking to the four cardinal points
    Four mon sisters are related with its construction and they said that if any of them was married one Bhuda should fall
    For any reason during the 1930 earthquake one of the Bhudas was destroyed( on this time the Mon sisters should be on 454 years ????)

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    2ª Guerra Mundial 2nd World War

    by elpariente Updated Aug 19, 2006

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    Cementerio por los caidos aliados en la Segunda Guerra mundial.
    Hay 27.000 soldados, ingleses, nepalís,australianos... enterrados y es un sitio cargado de melancolía y tristeza.
    Las lápidas emocionan al leerlas
    Cementery for the allies died in the Second World War
    There are 27.000 soldiers : British, Nepalies, Australians,... burried and is a place full of mellancholy and sadness

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  • prikje's Profile Photo

    Kyaik Pun Paya

    by prikje Updated Feb 28, 2006

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    Kyaik Pun Paya
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    Bago is know for its four seated 30m high Buddha build in 1476 by King Dhammazedi.
    An day trip from Yangon or a stop while travelling up north or down south.
    Don't pay the 10$ admission to support the governement you see enough just walking around it.
    Want to spend money , buy something from the kids the come to you.
    I know you allready have 1000 postcards but it is a way for them to make a living instead of begging.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Allied Grave Yard II

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 19, 2005

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    The Grave of a South African soldier

    For me quiet moving was to see the individual graves, the first one that I really looked at was the grave of a soldier that left his life here, with an inscription in Afrikaans, the Lieutenant who died on the 27th of February 1945 was J.J.M. Smit – being South African it was a very sad moment.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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