Gaw Daw Palin temple, Old Bagan, Bagan

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  • Fragments of the original fine plaster carvings
    Fragments of the original fine plaster...
    by pymayhua
  • Htilominlo Temple
    Htilominlo Temple
    by pymayhua
  • Budha Image inside the temple
    Budha Image inside the temple
    by pymayhua
  • pymayhua's Profile Photo

    Htilominlo Temple

    by pymayhua Written Apr 7, 2011

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    Htilominlo Temple
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    This large temple was built by King Nantaungmya in 1218. The temple is known to be the last Myanmar Style temple built in Bagan. The name is a misreading of the Pali word for 'Blessings of the Three Worlds'. King Nantaungmya erected the temple on this spot because it was here that he was chosen, from among five brothers, to be the crown prince. Nantaungmya was King Narapati Sithu's son. The selection of the heir to the throne had a tradition, which was to erect a white umbrella and the future ruler would be chosen when the white umbrella tilts in his position. After the event, it was decided by the state policy's council.
    Fragments of the original fine plaster carvings and glazed sandstone decorations have survived on the outside.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Photography

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  • euzkadi's Profile Photo

    Temple near the river.

    by euzkadi Written Jul 16, 2010

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    Built during the reign of King Narapatisithu and finiseh by his son Htominlo, is one of the largest and more spectacular temples in Bagan (specially for it´s location near the river). The temple was badly damaged by the 1975 earthquake because it stands near the quake´s epicentre.

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    Gaw Daw Palin temple, Old Bagan.

    by planxty Updated May 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gaw Daw Palin temple, Old Bagan, Myanmar.

    I have seen this place described as the "crowning achievement of the Late Bagan period", and I have no doubt this may be true, although aesthetically I found it much less appealing than many other temples I visited. Certainly, it is impressively large, rising to over 150 feet, but it didn't really move me much. Obviously, this is a personal view, and I would recommend you to visit yourself to form your own opinion. Perhaps you'll love it.

    Built by King Narapatisithu in the 12th century, the temple suffered severe damage in the earthquake of 1975, and was extensively restored with the help of UNESCO.

    As well as being a historical site, the place is evidently still very much used as a place of worship, and there were many monks and worshippers there when I visited.

    One useful thing to know is that amongst the vendors at the front of the temple, there is one selling second-hand English books, invaluable in a country where they are so hard to come by.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    DAY 2: Gawdawpalin Temple

    by hydronetta Written Jan 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This temple which is illuminated at night, was a short walk from our hotel so we decided to visit it on foot before heading on to our second day in Bagan. Of course we had to overcome the constant hassle of a horse cart owner trying to persuade us to hire his cart for the day.
    The Gawdawpalin Temple, one of the largest shrines of Bagan, was built by King Narapatisithu in the 11th century. But the construction was left unfinished until his son Htilominlo completed it. The temple is a double-storeyed square temple with porticoes on all four sides. Its white washed colour and its impressive size as soon as you reach the hotel makes you certainly want to visit it, but it’s certainly not the reality after you’ve seen others.

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Gawdawpalin Patho

    by elpariente Updated Jan 31, 2006

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    Gawdawpalin Patho 1
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    Es el mas grande de los templos de Bagan .
    Su nombre quiere decir :
    "Plataformadesde la cual se hace el homenage"

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