Mandalay Hill, Mandalay

4 out of 5 stars 18 Reviews

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  • Mandalay Hill
    by Belsaita
  • Mandalay Hill
    Mandalay Hill
    by IreneMcKay
  • Shrine on Mandalay Hill
    Shrine on Mandalay Hill
    by IreneMcKay
  • Belsaita's Profile Photo

    Views and Pagodas

    by Belsaita Written Feb 5, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just outside the North of downtown, Mandalay Hill summit is 230 m above the surrounding plain, so you can enjoy the panoramic views of Mandalay and its environs from there.

    Apparently you can climb the 1,729 steps of the covered southern stairway to reach the top. We were had not much time and it was very hot, so we did the lazy way: by taxi and the escalator that takes you to the Sutaungpyi Pagoda, located near the top the holy hill from which the Buddha reportedly predicted that a great religious city would emerge at its base.

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    A hike up Mandalay Hill

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jul 11, 2013

    Our hotel was near the foot of Mandalay Hill so we began our sightseeing by climbing up this 240 metre high hill. A small Burmese girl attached herself to us, and though we did not want a guide, she was actually so cute we did not have the heart to get rid of her. The climb up involved lots of stairs. It was hot and tiring, but there were lots of shrines and stalls to look at on route. The top of the hill should have provided great views but it was very hazy when we got there. Oh well, never mind.

    Mandalay Hill Shrine on Mandalay Hill View from the top.
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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    ENJOY THE VIEW FROM THE TOP

    by DennyP Written Aug 27, 2010

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    A good experience while in Mandalay is a visit to the top of Mandalay Hill..at nearly two hundred and fifty meters the view out over the Palace and the Shan Hills is worth the effort..I parked my bicycle at the bottom for a small fee ..also good security..I took a shared taxi to the top and walked back down..

    THE VIEW FROM THE TOP OF MANDALAY HILL ONE OF THE THE WAY TO GET AROUND VIEW OF ROYAL PALACE THE GOLDEN BUDDHA LOOKS DOWN ON MANDALAY
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  • euzkadi's Profile Photo

    Mandalay´s Viewpoint

    by euzkadi Written May 27, 2010

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    A 240 metre (760ft) high hill located in the northeastern part of the city. A nice and easy climb of half-hour with stops in small nats shrines, pagodas and a standing Buddha. The Main gate is guarded by two giant carved lion statues (The Chinthies). After the climb at the top of the mountain is located the Sutaungpyei (literally wish-fulfilling) Pagoda. The viewpoint offers a full panoramic view of the city and it´s surroundings. The Shan Hills to the east, the Mandalay Palace and the moat to the south and the Ayeyarwady to the west. If you don´t want to return walking there´s an elevator to the parking located halfway where it´s very easy to get a taxi.

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  • thedouglas's Profile Photo

    Mandalay Hill

    by thedouglas Updated Apr 20, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Described by Lonely Planet as an "easy" half hour climb to the top of this 230m hill, this was actually quite a hoof in an upward direction using the sheltered stairs/walkway. Its well worth the view of the surrounding countryside, the Palace and the city of Mandalay once you get there though.

    If you'd rather not do the walk, you can get transport to a roughly halfway starting point, and there is an escalator option from the main entrance.

    Close to the top, there's a large Buddha image, looking over the royal palace, and a shrine/reliquery with 3 bones of the Buddha housed inside.

    The Hill is a popular setting for sunset - and there is a fairly large influx of tourists at this time. Its generally recommended that you see this site either early in the morning or at this time of day, to avoid the heat.

    You must leave your shoes at the bottom - or have them out of sight in a bag. Leaving them behind is quite safe, as long as you descend to the same place.

    Surrounding views At the top
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  • hydronetta's Profile Photo

    Mandalay Hill (3)

    by hydronetta Written Jan 9, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On your way you’ll meet numerous pagodas and religious shrines and food or souvenir vendors, generally the atmosphere is rather kitsch… From its top (I assume), and from several way-stations along the ascent, one has a magnificent panorama of the city (misty weather permitting), the old Royal Palace and Fortress, as well as the Ayeyarwady river and the distant Hills.

    stop for a snack local artist some live here...

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    Mandalay Hill (2)

    by hydronetta Written Jan 9, 2007

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    Approximately half-way up the hill the Shweyattaw Temple houses a large golden standing statue of the Buddha commissioned by King Mindon; it is in a dramatic pose with his right hand pointing toward the Royal Palace and the city below. His faithful disciple, Ananda, prays attentively at his right side. The story is told that when Gautama Buddha visited the hill he stretched out his hand to the plain below and prophesied that a great city and religious center would be founded at its base.

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    Mandalay Hill (1)

    by hydronetta Updated Jan 9, 2007

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    Mandalay Hill (240 m high) is the dominant natural feature of Mandalay. At first you reach the base with its entrance stairway dominated by its magnificent guardian chinthe (half-lion, half-dragon) entry. From there its 1,729 steps of the covered staircase to the top, BUT I see no reason doing so because as we found out cars can reach at least half distance saving time and strength
    Unfortunately we were lazy enough to make up to the top (shame on us) because I am sure you can enjoy better views over pagodas of Kyauktawgyi , Kuthodaw and Sandamuni at its base

    Mandalay Hill glorious entrance covered staircase Buddhas all the way up view holy shrines on the way up

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  • albaaust's Profile Photo

    Hop onto a local bus and go up Mandalay Hill

    by albaaust Written Aug 30, 2006

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    Actually we went part of the way with our local taxi/tuk tuk driver and then because his taxi couldn't make it went with the locals on a local van/truck. We parked next to two giant white Chinthas and then hopped into the back of the truck with about 8 other people to a hair raising ride up the hill!

    At the top of the hill you have to pay a small fee to use your camera and video camera but, the view is pretty good of the Ayewaddy and pagaodas dotted throughout the countryside. The pagoda itself is a shimmering, mirror fantasy.

    It seems that some Burmese families also visiting the pagoda and there were quite a few picnicking when we were there.

    Part of the shimmering pagoda Family picnicking in front of one of the Buddhas The two white Chinthas half way up Mandalay Hill
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  • vodolaz's Profile Photo

    Mandalay Hill , for example...

    by vodolaz Updated Jul 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you came to see in Mandalay first time and nothing to do now , you`d better quickly visit local something worth seein`to kill your needless time , Mandalay Hill , for example...
    If you travel in Mandalay city by yourselves , every sleepy local taxi driver will take you on this beautiful Hill with his pleasure , but what can you do there ?
    Will try to help you to understand..

    view from Mandalay Hill plaque of pagoda on Mandalay hill muni Buddha view on city local people on the hill
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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    Onwards and definitely upwards.

    by planxty Updated May 15, 2006

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    Dominating the skyline of Mandalay is the impressive Manadalay Hill, which rises about 700 feet. It is dotted with shrines (both Buddhist and nat) and the views from the top are magnificent. Many people choose to visit, as I did, late in the afternoon for the sunset. Unfortunately, the day I was there it was quite hazy but impressive all the same.

    There are several ways to ascend the hill, depending on how fit you are. you can climb up from the South side (nearest the Northeastern corner of the palace comples, or alternatively, you can get a taxi about halfway up on a road that leads from the West. In truth, it's not too difficult a climb and there are plenty of places to stop and sit along the way. you can also grab a drink from the many vendors there.

    The hill was bombed extensively by Allied aircraft during the Second world War, as the Japanese were encamped there, and it's still possible to see the shrapnel holes in the temple at the summit (see photo).

    In theory, there's a small camera fee, but I wasn't asked for it, and didn't see anywhere I was supposed to pay it.

    A definite "must see" on any travellers itinerary.

    View from Mandalay Hill, Myanmar. Summit temple, Mandalay Hill, Myanmar. Hazy view, Mandalay Hill, Myanmar. Sunset view, Mandalay Hill, Myanmar. Mandalay Hill, Myanmar.
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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Mandalay hill

    by elpariente Written Jan 26, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mandalay

    La colina de Mandalay es un "must" para ver lapuesta de sol aunque esté nublado
    Puedes subir andando descalzo en media hora o mejor puedes escojer las escaleras mecánicas

    Mandalay hill is a must to see the sunset even if it is cloudy.
    You may go up on bare foot about half an hour or better to takethe scalator

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Mandalay Hill Sunset

    by Hewer Updated May 4, 2005

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    There is a large circular viewing area on the top of Mandalay Hill and this is a good spot to take in the sunset. You can see for quite a long way and it's possible to pick out landmarks around town. if you want to do this, you should probably head up at least an hour before sunset because it takes around thirty minutes to walk to the top.

    View from Mandalay Hill

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Walk up Mandalay Hill

    by Hewer Updated Apr 27, 2005

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    Definitely a worthwhile thing to do. There are great views from the top and many points of interest along the way.

    Bear in mind the number of stairs - there are a total of 1729 of them. It'll take you about 30-40 minutes to reach the top, or perhaps as little as 20 minutes if you are trying to outrun a persistent taxi driver or tout ;-)

    There is also an elevator - but even if you take it you still have about 30 stairs ahead of you.

    Monks, Mandalay Hill

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  • hjohnso4's Profile Photo

    Mandalay Hill - WWII History

    by hjohnso4 Written Mar 1, 2004

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    Mandaly Hill was the scene of fierce fighting in 1945. Mandalay was of no great strategic importance, though it's symbolic value as a center of British Burma was high. The following excerpt is from John Master's The Road Past Mandalay:

    "We stood, so to speak, on top of Mandalay. We aslo stood, at much closer range, on top of a good many Japanese. The temples, cellars and mysterious chambers covering Mandalay Hill were made of reinforced concrete. The 4th Ghurkas had taken the summit, and no Japanese was alive and visible; but scores of them were alive, invisible, in the subteranean chambers.

    A gruesom campaign of extermination began, among the temples of one of the most sacred places of the Buddhist faith. Sikh machine-gunners sat all day on the flat roofs, their guns aimed downhill on either side of the covered stairway. Every now and then a Japanese put out his head and fired a quick upwards shot. Our engineers brought up beehive charges, blew holes through the concrete, poured in petrol, and fired a Very light down the holes. Sullen explosions rocked the buildings and Japanese rolled out into the open, on fire, but firing ... the Japanese fell, burning. We blew in huge steel doors, rolled in kegs of petrol or oil, and set them on fire with tracer bullets. Our infantry fought into the tunnels behind a hail of grenades and licking sheets of fire from the flame-throwers. Grimly, under the stench of burning bodies and the growing pall of decay, past the equally repellent Buddhist statuary(showing famine, pestillence, men eaten alive by vultures) the battalions fought their way down the ridge to the southern foot - to face the moat and thirty-foot-thick walls of Fort Dufferin."
    ---------------------------

    The hill hasn't quite recovered from the shock. Some of the funds for reconstruction were provided by the Indian Army's 19th division, the division which took the hill. A plaque is found on a supporting pillar of on of the temple roofs, about 3/4th of the way to the top.

    19th Indian Division Plaque, Mandalay Hill
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