Rangoon Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by cochinjew
  • Local Customs
    by cochinjew
  • Dried and ready for wrapping
    Dried and ready for wrapping
    by thedouglas

Best Rated Local Customs in Rangoon

  • vodolaz's Profile Photo

    Pour your Buddha !

    by vodolaz Written Jun 22, 2006

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    There are eight days of burmese week `cos Wednesday divides on two parts in noon owing to Buddha was born in Wednesday. The little statuettes of Buddha symbolize each week`s day and are situated around all pagodas. If you were born in Monday , for example , you had to find your statuette of Buddha and pour water on his head , also you can buy some religious souvenires on entrance and then place them to him . Then Buddha give you good luck and happiness. It`s much better to do it if today is the day of week when you were born...
    But how can you find your day of a week , if all the inscriptions are in Burmese ?
    You can try to learn Burmese , ha-ha ..!
    OK , I`ll show you the easier way , just say ` spasibo ` !
    The point is that every day of a week has his own animal just like a symbol .
    Monday - Tiger
    Tuesday - Lion
    Wednesday AM - Elephant with tusks
    Wednesday PM - Elephant without tusks
    Thursday - Little Mouse
    Friday - Big Mouse
    Saturday - Big Snake Naga
    Sunday - Karudo Bird
    So if you don`t see any inscriptions in English , or in your native language ( ha-ha ! ) , you just had to find statuette of your animal near the Buddha`s statuette , and then be sure that it is your day of a week... Pour Buddha !

    I told this for what ? Just say ` spasibo ! `
    Thank you for your attention !

    pourin` Sunday Monday pourin` Monday your tale-teller pouring son`s Buddha
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • vodolaz's Profile Photo

    Count your day

    by vodolaz Written Jun 22, 2006

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    Not only animals are symbolised the days of week in Burma .
    Also numbers...
    Please take a look on this donation boxes.
    You can see the numbers beneath the animal`s images in burmese digits...
    See :
    Sunday is 6
    Monday is 15
    Tuesday is 8
    Wednesday AM is 17
    Thursday is 19
    Friday is 20
    Saturday is 10
    and Wednesday PM is 12

    I told it for whom ?
    Just say ` spasibo ! `

    donation boxes by the days of week
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Bamboo Scaffolding

    by Hewer Written Feb 23, 2005

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    Most of the scaffolding used in Yangon construction projects is made of bamboo. in this picture, you can see a restoration project at the Shwedagon Paya complex in Yangon.

    Myanmar is a major exporter of customised bamboo scaffolding and is the number one supplier to India, Bangladesh and Thailand.

    View from Shwedagon Paya Complex

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  • cochinjew's Profile Photo

    Entrepreneurial spirit of the Younger Generation

    by cochinjew Written May 24, 2009

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    I have known this family who has a small corner store along anwahrata road, the indian section of downtown Rangoon. They are moslems, and he has vague notions, like many of his compatriorts, of where their ancestors had come from, but absolutely no loyalty or connection to India. the wife is a Bamar Moslem. the children are all educated and when they can they helpout at the shop, whether selling little things or sewing leather goods, whatever they can. the older three have either finished university or finishing university and the younger two are at school.
    I am always very touched by the cavernous welcome they afford me when i come into their view from their corner store.

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    Wear Lungis

    by vickss Written Aug 17, 2004

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    Lungis appeared to be the national dress of people--male or female in the country. The apparel is basically a wraparound which people use for the bottomhalf. Locals told me they are as infamous as Scottish kilns as a lotta people do not care about wearing an underwear.. haha.. shame shame..It sells for about $2 which is gender neutral.. an advantage..!! Checks are the most popular pattern on the lungi. This product by the way is similar to what men wear in India but then it is a definite NO for formal attire(not applicable in South India) and people usually wear it as a sleeping gown --topless-- at homes. Though you are not expected to wear one in Myanmar if you do you make more pals..!

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    Praying at the pagodas

    by vickss Written Aug 24, 2004

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    Praying at the pagodas is very distinct activity of the people at Yangon and I assume even at other places. Like any Asian worship place.. You need to open your footwear when inside the premises of the pagoda.
    I am not a buddhist but from what I saw people just kneel down and sit quitely with folded hands to the pagodas. In the evening I saw people sitting with lighted candles at the Shwedagon and it was very peaceful atmosphere even though there were a lotta people.

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    Go buy a longyi- they're a...

    by LAOWAI Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Go buy a longyi- they're a dollar, are very confortable, and people generally treat you better than your average tourist because they see you're dressed like them. Almost every man wears one of these in Burma. Women wear a similar sort with flowers all over it.

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  • gabriellefox's Profile Photo

    Travel with an open heart and...

    by gabriellefox Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Travel with an open heart and mind.I went to Kyaung Myaing to see my great aunt. She lives in an apartment at the top of a block, which doubled as a day nursery for pre school children.

    It was like walking into the set of The King and I, and 15 little faces regarded me with some bewilderment. I must have looked huge. I am about a foot taller than the average male in Myanmar, but they soon came to sit on my lap and have their photos taken with the big foreigner.

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    I don't know whether anything...

    by Krystynn Written Aug 24, 2002

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    I don't know whether anything has changed since 1994. Back then, I had to change all my US$ into the Burmese kyat currency. Apparently the currency given out to tourists is different from what the locals are using! It was compulsory for Foreign Independent Travelers (FITs) to exchange a minimum of US $300. Don't panic. The Central Bank of Myanmar issues Foreign Exchange Certificates (FECs) in Dollar Units. For more details, perhaps you may like to check with your local Myanmar Embassy. Also, please remember to declare ALL your possessions in one of the many forms you're supposed to fill up! Because if you don't or have inadvertently forgotten to declare say... your camera... don't be surprised if you get taxed for that camera when you're leaving Yangon.

    Footnote (May 2002): I have finally checked on the latest policy about bringing money in to the country. Everybody needs to apply for a Visa, which comes in various category. Getting a tourist visa, valid for a stay of up to 28 days, in one of the Myanmar embassies is a very straightforward procedure. You'll only need to fill in THREE forms, attach a passport-size photograph to each one of those and pay the visa fee (which amounts to approx. US$20). Visas can also be extended up to 30 days at an office of the Department of Immigration and Manpower. This process requires FIVE photographs + cost of visa fee (which costs slightly more than US$20).

    Visas are also available upon arrival at Yangon International Airport. However, you can only qualify for this category IF you arrange it through a tour operator/ sign up for tour package.

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  • Krystynn's Profile Photo

    Again, this is Burma. Read: ...

    by Krystynn Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Again, this is Burma. Read: A nation of predominantly CONSERVATIVE Buddhist people. For the ladies, please leave ALL your sexy outfits at home - and that includes your bewitching tight party dresses that your boyfriend/ husband bought for you, the jaw-dropping mini-skirts you bought last week at Bloomingdale's, the absolutely lovely bermudas/ shorts you had specially set aside to be used for your North Asia jaunts..et al. Yup, don't bring them along. I had to pack only looooong dresses and shirts/ blouses which wouldn't expose my arms (!!). O.K., here's a general guideline: Pack along outfits that even June Cleaver (the Mom in 'Leave It To Beaver') would approve of!!!! Believe me, the Burmese government doesn't quite bother whether the weather's too hot for you or that you're almost dying of dehydration. Modesty is everything in Burma!!!!

    'A generous man will prosper; he who refreshes others will himself be refreshed.' (Proverbs 11:25)

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  • cochinjew's Profile Photo

    Very Devout Buddhists

    by cochinjew Written May 18, 2009

    Burmese are unlike any other group of people whom you would run into in Asia.. they are very devout but more importantly they live their belief systems.. it is heartwarming to see them accumulating merit by doing good deeds on a daily basis...
    here are two photographs of a baby, who is still at his mothers breast, learning to pray without being told, at the Schwedagon pagoda..

    In no country in Asia, I have felt the spiritual ambience as I have felt in Burma.. there are rituals like they have in India but the sensation is very different..

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    Local Telephone Booths

    by cochinjew Written May 24, 2009

    Telephones or public phones as we know may not exist in Burma, but around each street corner, there would be a table with a few telephones placed on top.. you can make local landline or mobilephone calls or long dsitance calls to other towns. it is very cheap, local calls are only 100 kyats per minute (yuzana garden hotel charges 600 kyats per minute). there is one in front of Yuzana Garden Hotel that i use..

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  • cochinjew's Profile Photo

    the jolly man of anwahrata road

    by cochinjew Written May 24, 2009

    What are you? Hindou or Moslem? No, I am an Yehudi. I am a moslem he called back but what does it matter, we are all human beings.. and for the next few minutes the pavement was filled with the sound of his laughter and the ambiance of his mirth..

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  • ishi01's Profile Photo

    Sidestreet Slumber

    by ishi01 Written Nov 21, 2003

    I was shocked to find someone sleeping by the side of the street - and hes NOT homeless. Apparently because it is so hot at home, they opt to sleep out side the house, and sometimes at the side of the street.

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    Spitoons

    by ishi01 Written Feb 4, 2004

    Apparently, it is still fashionable to chew on betel nut and tobacco in Myanmar, expecially amongs the older generations. Walking down the street you might just run into spitoons strategically placed on the pavements.

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