Related Cambodia Favorites Tips

  • King Sihamoni and his parents.
    King Sihamoni and his parents.
    by cachaseiro
  • Fans and ice cream. A must.
    Fans and ice cream. A must.
    by PandawitchElphie
  • Wide-brin hats will save you
    Wide-brin hats will save you
    by PandawitchElphie

Most Viewed Favorites in Cambodia

  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Tickets for Angkor Temples

    by SirRichard Written Mar 24, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: You don't have conventional tickets here. All the temples around Angkor are considered within a huge tourist complex. So you buy a Pass for all of them, which allows you the entrance to any of the sites "from dawn till dusk" (no strict hours).

    You can buy passes for 1 day (20USD), 3 days (40USD) or 1 week (60USD) at a little house on the right on the road from Siem Reap to Angkor Wat temple. You have to bring a passport pic for that.

    My Pass
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Temples in the jungle

    by SirRichard Written Mar 8, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Cambodia is one of the few places in the world where you can still see temples which are not yet 100% uncovered, they still remain under those amazing trees and their roots. Is somehow like in Central America, where you can see mayan ruins still covered by that amazing jungles.
    The one in the pic is the Ta Prom temple in Angkor.

    Me under a huge tree
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    normal bathing suits for us

    by richiecdisc Written May 7, 2005

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    Favorite thing: If you make it all the way to Cambodia, it is unlikely you will miss out on Angkor Wat but try not to underestimate all there is to see there. To try and see it in one day is a great disservice to an admittedly over hyped but unquestionably important and imposing archeological site. Pay up the $40, get yourself a tuk-tuk or motto driver, and enjoy what is likely a once in a lifetime experience.

    Fondest memory: Going to the beach is never the same on the road as when you are on your home territory. There are different rules, depending on where you are and especially with regard to appropriate dress. Many northern Europeans, for instance, are used to going topless, which can cause a stir when visiting North America. Bikini’s that cause no problems in the Western world turn a Muslim beach upside down. In general, Eastern ideas are a bit more conservative when it comes to skin exposure on the beach though this is rarely a big problem in more touristy areas. One should always keep this in mind and certainly not take offense if you garner what you would normally consider an unusual amount of attention from the locals.

    A case in point took place on the beach in Cambodia on our most recent trip there. Though there was a smattering of Westerners clad in what would be considered normal back home, most were locals. The young guys dressed much as they do in the west, donning surf shorts, or at least cutoffs but the girls not only hung out on the beach fully clothed but also went in the water as such. I had seen this previously on Muslim beaches in Malaysia but was surprised to see it there. It wasn’t a problem but since we wanted to swim and had only our “normal” bathing suits with us, we ventured far down the beach to where there was only one person manning the very last beach side restaurant. It was a true little paradise with fine white sand and warm tropical waters. We lounged and found ourselves not even bothered by the waiter, who seemed preoccupied with his book. (concluded below in Fondest Memory)

    The Bayon of the Angkor ruins
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Beaches
    • Archeology

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    monks on the beach

    by richiecdisc Written May 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: As chance would have it, a group of young monks came strolling up the beach, resplendent in their orange robes. They took a long look at Doreen, wearing an attractive though not particularly revealing bikini. We thought little of it until they made camp just up the beach from us. We figured they were just having a break from the sun as they sat beneath a swaying palm. But it became obvious that getting out of the sun was not the only thing on their collective minds. Every time Doreen ventured into the water, they were all eyes. They soon got ready to take their leave and passed again in front of us as they headed back from where they came. Again, they took a long look at her, even turning back a couple times after passing. Doreen got more attention than she expected, but she was outside the local norm with regard to how she was dressed. Though I would have normally been more reserved in snapping their photo, I figured they were outside the norm of monk behavior too.

    monks & ducks on the beach
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Beaches

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  • bijo69's Profile Photo

    The temples of Angkor

    by bijo69 Written Jul 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The temples of Angkor are certainly the main reason for visiting Cambodia. Don't try to rush through it! There are so many beautiful carvings to discover... Don't miss either sunrise or sunset there.

    One-day pass is 20US$
    Three-days-pass 40US$

    They can be obtained right at the checkpoints.

    You'll need some kind of transportation to get around. Best is to hire a motorbike with or without driver.

    sunset
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • bkoon's Profile Photo

    Angkor Massage by the Blind

    by bkoon Written Feb 15, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: After a long day of temple visiting, climbing up and down of the temples, it would be great to have a massage. Try the Angkor Massage by the Blind. It was cheap at USD3 for an hour. All the masseurs were blind. Despite the fact, they still provided me with a very good massage.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    A great book to read before visiting Cambodia.

    by cachaseiro Written Jan 30, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: "River of time" by english author Jon Swain is a fantastic book about Cambodia under khmer rouge.
    It also covers many other interesting aspects of Indochina and it's a very good read before you go.
    It's very well written and heart breaking and grueling in a way that made it very hard for me to put the book down.
    Read it before you go, or even after you have been.

    River of time by Jon Swain.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Study Abroad

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Cambodia is rubber country.

    by cachaseiro Written Jan 28, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Cam bodia is one of the worlds largest producers of natural rubber.
    It's often malaysian companies that have branched out their buisness to Cambodia where they have more space and cheaper labour costs compared to Malaysia.
    When you see a lot of thin trees in straight lines by the side of the road in Cambodia then it is mosr likely a rubber plantation and the local workers walk around the trees and collect the natural rubber that is used for car tires around the world.
    You also see rubber factories around Cambodia where the natural rubber is treated and made in to car tires.

    Rubber factory. Local guy collecting rubber. Boy helping his father collecting rubber.
    Related to:
    • Business Travel

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    The khmer/cambodian people.

    by cachaseiro Written Jan 28, 2009

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    Favorite thing: Most of the inhabitants of Camdia are of khmer origin.
    The khmer people originally came from India and Sri Lanka who came to the region around 1200 years ago and even if they have been mixed up with the other south east asian groups over the years, the cambodians remain quite a bit darker than their neighbours in Thailand and Vietnam.
    I personally find the cambodians very pretty people with very unique faces.

    Cambodian children. Cambodian girl. Cambodian man.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Cambodia is palm sugar country.

    by cachaseiro Written Feb 18, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Cambodia has a big production of palm sugar and it is often a small family business where daddy clims up the trees to get the palm juice while mummy is busy cooking it in to palm sugar.
    The se people can often be seen doing their business by the side of the road and i have found that you can usually stop by and visit them and get a taste of their home made sugar while seeing them working.

    On his way up to get palm juice. Making palm sugar. Me, trying to climb up the palm tree.
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Visit the jungle

    by SirRichard Written Sep 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: All the northern part of the country is covered with jungle, where you can find lost tribes, up in the north hills.
    But even if you only visit Angkor, as soon as you go a bit out of town you will find rain forests.
    The one in the photo is at Koulen Nat. Park, near the Banteay Srei temple, in Angkor.

    Some jungle
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge

    by SirRichard Written Sep 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: After the US army left the country (after Vietnam war), the maoist Khmer Rouge forces of Pol Pot took the power in Cambodia, starting one of the most infamous periods in the country's recent history.
    You can visit some of the extermination camps of the regime, the "Killing Fields", near Phnom Penh.
    If you wanna read something more about that topic, look at:
    http://www.angelfire.com/mac/egmatthews/worldinfo/wars/cambodia.html

    The Killing Fields
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Wildlife

    by SirRichard Updated Sep 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I didn't see much wildlife, as I wasn't looking for trekking or nature. But during a visit to Koulen Nat. Park, near Angkor, I saw these giant termites crossing by the trail I was following. Looking at them closely you can see the enormous jigsaws!!

    Wild beasts :-)
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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  • PA68's Profile Photo

    Buy a Krama

    by PA68 Updated Aug 26, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Roads in Cambodia can be very dusty during the dry season. In fact, sometimes they can resemble a misty Scottish day if you get a truck going by you at speed. Do yourself a favour and buy a Krama (traditional Cambodian scarf ) at the market as soon as you get the chance. They're great for keeping the dust out of your lungs and wiping away sweat (which you will have plenty of).

    Oh, you also get them in a vast array of colours. Here I am sporting the blue and white version that matches my shirt (almost). Both the shirt and the Krama are now blue and brown as it is very hard to wash Cambodia out of your clothes.

    Everybody be cool. This is a robbery.

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  • PA68's Profile Photo

    Drink Lots of Fluids

    by PA68 Written Jul 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It's pretty hot and humid in Cambodia and it's important to drink lots of fluids to avoid deyhdration. You'll find stalls like this one all over the place. However, don't always expect to find everything that you seen on the stall available inside the chiller box.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

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