Angkor Thum Things to Do

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    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn

Most Recent Things to Do in Angkor Thum

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    Angkor Pass

    by victorwkf Updated Dec 14, 2009

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    Angkor Pass, Cambodia
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    In order to visit all the Angkor monuments, including those further away such as Banteay Srei, all visitors must obtain the Angkor Pass at a ticket booth along the road from Siem Reap to Angkor Wat (or you can get them at the Sokha Angkor Resort if you are stay there). There are 3 types of passes as follows:

    US$ 20 for one day
    US$ 40 for three days
    US$ 60 for one week (7 days)

    Do note the following:
    - This pass is important because there will be checks at the entrances of the monuments, especially the popular ones such as Angkor Wat, Bayon, Ta Prohm etc. You will not be allowed to enter without the pass.
    - All passes are issued with a picture. They are not transferable to another person.
    - Fees must be paid in US dollars, Cambodian Riel, Thai Baht or Euro. Credit cards are not accepted for payment, but there is a bank counter at the ticket booth where visitors can get a cash advance on their credit card.
    - Entry is free for children under 12 years old. Children 12 and above must pay full price.
    - Entry is free for all Cambodian nationals.
    - There are no discounts for groups.
    - The Angkor Pass is not refundable.
    - Validity of the Angkor Pass is between 5.30am and 5.30pm on the same day.

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    The South Gate

    by Maria81 Updated Dec 4, 2009
    Guardians of the South Gate

    The south gate of Angkor Thom is the best preserved, with the road across the moat lined with statues - 54 of them on each. When the driver has told me that I had to get out of the car, my initial reaction was 'Oh, no! gonna have to walk in this heat'. However, it was just to see the figures. Which were, no doubt worth it.

    The figures represent the Hindu myth of 'Churning of the Ocean. On the left side, 54 guardians pull the head of the snake while on the right side 54 demon gods pull the snake's tail in the opposite direction. This started to churn the ocean which, in turn, was the source of the creation of the cosmos. Here's batte of good and evil for you!

    The stone gate has 3 towers with human faces on each of them - this is where you first see the likeness of the faces of Bayon. There are also statues of Indra on the elephants, with the god armed with his a lightning bolt.

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    Buddhist and Hindu Symbols at the Bayon

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    Reclining Buddha in Bayon Causeway
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    The Bayon has both Buddhist and Hindu symbolism. The original builder, King Jayavarman VII (ruled 1181-1219) was Mahayana Buddhist. Later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings modified and added to the Bayon, so now you see a mix of religious symbols. Often a pedestal that once held a Hindu linga (you can tell by the drainage channel) was given a Buddha statue instead.

    Outside the Bayon temple itself there are a couple of large gilded statues of Buddha that are more modern commemorative monuments for early French architects who worked for the EFEO (Ecole Francaise D’Extreme Orient). One is located between the Bayon and the Baphuon; it is for Charles Carpeaux. He was not officially in the EFEO but worked with Henri Dufour inspecting Angkor buildings and died in 1904 from the poor working conditions. The other is for Jean Commaille, who was in charge of the Angkor conservation project from 1908 until he was killed in 1916 by armed robbers.

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    Phimeanakas and the Royal Pools

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    South Side of Phimeanakas
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    There is not much left inside the Royal Enclosure walls except for Phimeanakas and the royal pools. Phimeanakas means "celestial palace" and was built between 1000 - 1025 by several kings. It was once the royal palace and is said to have had a golden spire. There is an interesting legend about Phimeanakas:

    "......a golden tower, to the top of which the ruler ascends nightly. It is common belief that in the tower dwells a genie, formed like a serpent with nine heads, which is Lord of the entire Kingdom. Every night this genie appears in the shape of a woman, with whom the sovereign couples. Not even the wives of the King may enter here. At the second watch the King comes forth and is then free to sleep with his wives and concubines."

    It looks like the two royal pools, one for women and one for men, were once quite nice; however, I want to know why the women's pool is way bigger than the men's pool! The main gate for the Royal Enclosure is on the east wall and connects to middle of the Central Square near the Terrace of the Elephants.

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    The Baphuon

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    East Side of the Baphuon
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    The Baphuon is a temple located inside Angkor Thom (northwest of the Bayon and west of the Central Square) at the former center of the city that predated Angkor Thom. It is said to represent the mythical Mount Meru and was originally dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva. Construction was started in the mid-11th century by Suryavarman I. The three-tiered temple mountain was completed by Udayadityavarman II, who ruled from 1049 to 1065, and was once 50 meters tall. However, the huge temple was built on a sand landfill, which caused large portions to collapse over time. The Baphuon has been only partially restored due to a 25 year delay during the Cambodian civil war. Restoration resumed in 1995 and some areas are presently (2009) not open to the public.

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    Central Square of Angkor Thom

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    South End of Angkor Thom's Central Square
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    The Central Square of Angkor Thom was the place for many activities such as military parades, public ceremonies and what we would now call circus acts. It now has a much different role, i.e., it is a parking area for tourist buses and tuk tuks. The pictures here were taken from the Terrace of the Elephants near the east gate of the Royal Enclosure, so they also give views of the top of the 350 meter Terrace itself. See also a videoclip.

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    Kleangs and 12 Towers of Prasat Suor Prat

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    North Kleang and Two Towers
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    The east side of Angkor Thom's Central Square has two Kleangs and the 12 Towers of Prasat Suor Prat (temples of the tightrope dancers). The layouts north and south of the Avenue of Victory are similar with a Kleang and six towers, but the Kleangs are different and have different pools around them. The North Kleang was built by Jayavarman V, who ruled from 968 to 1001. The towers were built by Jayavarman VII (1181-1219). The king would be entertained while watching from the Terrace of the Elephants by dancers performing on ropes strung between the towers. See also a videoclip.

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    Terrace of the Elephants

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 13, 2009

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    Main (Center) Outwork of Terrace
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    The Terrace of the Elephants is a 350 meter long terrace along the west side of the Central Square. It has five outworks where royals viewed activities in the Central Square. The center outwork is near the east gate of the Royal Enclosure. The northmost outwork is next to the Terrace of the Leper King. The southmost outwork is by what is now one of the carparks for Angkor Thom. The center part of the Terrace retaining wall has carvings of garudas and lions. The north and south ends have carved parades of elephants. See the tip on the Central Square for views of the top of the Terrace.

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    Access to the Giant Reclining Buddha

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 11, 2009

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    This Way to the Giant Reclining Buddha of Baphuon
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    By the late 15th century, when the Baphuon was converted to a Buddhist temple, the tallest tower had collapsed and a 9 meter tall by 70 meter long statue of a reclining Buddha was built on the second level of the west side. I missed it because I did not read a small sign that was on the north side (even though I took a picture of it). One can go past the gate in the Royal Enclosure wall between the Baphuon and the Phimeanakas, and see the west side of the Baphuon with the giant reclining Buddha. The sign also shows you how to find the Buddha (in green) which is hard to discern.

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    East Causeway of the Baphuon

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 10, 2009

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    The Baphuon from the Central Square
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    The main entrance to the Baphuon is reached by an elevated sandstone causeway on the east side that is 200 meters long. The far east end of the causeway starts at the south end of Angkor Thom's Central Square. It is flanked by two oval pools and a rectangular reservoir.

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    Angkor Thom South Gate

    by AlbuqRay Updated May 25, 2009

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    Approaching Angkor Thom South Gate
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    The south gate is one of five gates in the wall around the city of Angkor Thom. There are also gates on the west and north sides, and two gates on the east side. The south gate is 7.2 km north of Siem Reap, and 1.7 km north of the main (west) entrance to Angkor Wat. This makes it a popular starting place for Angkor Thom tours. The gate itself is 20 m high and has four of the huge smiling faces discussed in the General tip. It also has carvings of three-headed elephants on four sides. The wall that connects all the gates is 8 m high and is surrounded by a moat that is 100 m wide. The moat once had crocodiles but they must be gone now since I saw people in the water.

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    Bas-Reliefs at the Bayon

    by AlbuqRay Updated May 25, 2009

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    Three Tier Panoramic Bas-Relief
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    There are over a kilometer of bas-relief carvings at the Bayon. The ones on the first level are about everyday life in Cambodia the late 1100's, and this includes land and naval battles with the Chams. The three-tiered bas-relief on the east wall south of the causeway is about the land battle. The Cambodians are aided by their historical allies, the Chinese. The carvings on the east end of the south gallery depict a naval battle with the Chams on Tonle Sap Lake.

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    Dancers at the Bayon

    by AlbuqRay Updated May 25, 2009

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    Dancer Hiding from the Rain at the Bayon
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    There are dancers in costume at the Bayon (also at Angkor Wat). They did not perform while I was there since it started to rain. The apsaras carved on the walls of the Bayon also danced among the walls centuries ago. In some places you can see that the apsaras were once brilliantly colored. The Bayon also has carvings of male dancers in several places.

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    The Bayon

    by AlbuqRay Updated May 25, 2009

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    East Causeway (Main Entrance) of the Bayon
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    The Bayon is at the exact center of Angkor Thom. As for most Angkor temples (except Angkor Wat), the main entrance is the east causeway. There are 54 towers with 216 smiling faces of Avalokiteshvara (Hindu god) or maybe they are of Jayavarman VII, the king who built the Bayon starting in the late 12th century. See the General tip here about these faces. Although the Bayon was the last state temple to be built at Angkor, and the only Angkorian state temple to be built primarily as a Mahayana Buddhist shrine dedicated to the Buddha, it also has Hindu and Theravada Buddhist symbols that were added by subsequent kings. The Bayon tends to be crowded since (after Angkor Wat) it is the second most popular temple. See also a couple of videoclips.

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    South Gate - Churning of the Ocean of Milk

    by AlbuqRay Updated May 22, 2009

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    Angkor Thom South Gate Causeway
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    Churning of the Ocean of Milk is a common motif for Angkorian causeways. The one at the west gate of Angkor Wat is the most famous; however, all five gates of Angkor Thom have smaller versions. I saw the one at the south gate. As you approach the gate, there are 54 gods (deva) on the left side and 54 demons (asura) on the right side.

    The Ocean of Milk in Hindu mythology is the place where 13 precious treasures were lost. Using Vishnu's idea, the gods and demons worked together for a millennium churning the sea to free them. One was the elixir of immortality called amrita. The technique was to wrap the serpent Vasuki around Mount Mandara, and then to rotate the mountain to churn the surrounding ocean by alternately pulling on the serpent's head and then on his tail. The demons held the head and the gods the tail. Of course, Peng Thai made me stand by the demons when he took my picture.

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