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  • Tedsocoa's Profile Photo

    Cambodian Monney: the RIEL

    by Tedsocoa Written Mar 31, 2008

    Favorite thing: Everywhere in Cambodia you can pay with US$ and normally the change will be given to you in local Riel.
    But for small expenses like a Tuk Tuk or some drinks, you can always pay with Riel.
    The rate is about 4000 Riel for one US$ and 5000 Riel for one Euro. The smallest banknote starts with 50 Riel, but you don't see them often.
    Most frequent is 1000Riel, (4 in one $) and it's good to have some in your pocket for tips.
    Remind that the average wage in Cambodia is about 2 us$/day, so when you give one $, they are very happy !
    Everywhere in the streets you can change dollars in Riel, in small boutiques like this one,see under, often just before a goldboutique.

    Money change shop in the street.
    Related to:
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    • Women's Travel

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Take a Ride Through the Cambodian Countryside

    by Etoile2B Written Oct 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: One of our favorite days was our third day in Angkor. We knew nothing about the more remote sites in the park (Banteay Srey and Kbal Spean) but our driver, Happy, suggested a trip out. Since the sites are quite some distance from Siem Reap there’s a long drive through the Cambodian countryside to reach them. The ride, although bumpy and dusty as the majority of the roads this far out aren’t paved, gave us an unique opportunity to not only to view the beautiful landscape of this country, but to observe local customs and culture and interact with locals firsthand. We saw a wedding procession waking down the main street of a small village and Cambodian women paving a dirt road by hand. Local children helped push our tuk tuk across a makeshift bridge that had been “repaired” by depositing cement and pottery fragments into the hole. And we even got a peek inside the home of a family kind enough to let us use their bathroom. I had tried to pee on the side of the road behind a bush but some local children were so fascinated by us that they wouldn’t give me any privacy. We were greeted with warm smiles and friendly waves from all the people as we rode by in our tuk tuk and touched by the generosity and gracious nature of the Cambodian people.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Monkeys!!!!

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 30, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: On the first day of our visit to the temples of Angkor we encountered a clan of monkeys on the road between Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom. Our tuk tuk driver pulled over to the side of the road to allow us to check them out. The monkeys were obviously used to people. They were friendly and permitted us to get rather close. They were eating bananas and there were babies hanging off their mothers and playing with each other. It was my first encounter with wild monkeys so it was truly a special treat! Keep your eye out for the monkeys during your visit to Angkor.

    Monkeys at Angkor Monkeys at Angkor Monkeys at Angkor Monkeys at Angkor Monkeys at Angkor
    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Monks & Nuns

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 25, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Although Angkor Wat and the surrounding temples are ancient, they are still active religious sites. Any temple with an existing Buddha will be adorned by the faithful. There are active monasteries throughout and you will certainly see monks and nuns attending to these sites. Additionally, monks from outside Angkor make a regular pilgrimage to these holy sites so it is not unusual to encounter theme exploring the temples along side the other tourists. The monks and nuns in residence will allow you to participate in a blessing, for a donation, which is an unique experience. When encountering a monk or nun, please ask for permission before taking a picture, as some do not wish to be photographed. Many of the visiting monks, clad in their saffron robes, are here as part of a solemn religious pilgrimage, but as we learned, all Buddhist men must serve as a monk at least once in their life so some of the monks we encountered acted more like tourists than religious pilgrims and were just as excited to take pictures of and with other tourists as we were.

    A monk paying hommage at Ta Keo. A nun at Angkor Thom. A nun and a monk at Angkor Thom. A monk taking pictures of other tourists at Ta Keo Monks climbing Ta Keo.
    Related to:
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    • Archeology

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Bathrooms at Angkor Wat

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 25, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There are several options for public bathrooms at Angkor Wat. If you are standing with your back to Angkor Wat there are vendors and food stalls are located to the right inside the complex. There is also an active monastery near the stalls with public bathrooms, but be sure you have money with you, as the children of the monastery will lead you to the bathrooms and then request payment, but this money goes to the monastery. There is also a public bathroom on the opposite side of the complex directly across from the monastery and vendors. This stall was free of charge and lacked tourists.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Children of Angkor

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 25, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: There are communities of people who actually live on the grounds of the temples of Angkor. They are the descendants of the peoples who built these majestic temples. The children of these people can be found hanging out in the temples or helping their parents at the stands selling their wares inside the complex. On our second day we met several children, most of them were trying to sell us a scarf or trying to get us to have breakfast at their parent’s stand. But we had a lot of fun with these kids. In the dark, while we were waiting for sunrise over Srah Srang, two little girls took my hand and guided me to the bathroom and back. They were such sweet girls that I was compelled to have breakfast with them and Marc had breakfast at another nearby stand with the kids he had befriended.

    Since many of the families make their money selling food or goods to the tourists visiting Angkor, these children will try and sell to you. They can be very persistent. Just simply tell them you are not interested. You may have to repeat this several times, but just don’t make any empty promises to shut them up. They will remember. But have fun and enjoy the beautiful children of Angkor during your visit.

    A young boy at Banteay Srey. Children at a temple. A boy at Ta Keo. Local children at Ta Keo. Cambodian boys at Banteay Srey.
    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Better closer than afar

    by SLLiew Updated Jul 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: While Angkor Wat looks magnificent from afar, it does no justice for Bayon from afar.

    You need to climb the small steps up the Bayon temple to appreciate the beautiful four face towers of Bayon.

    The difference of just viewing from a distance to climbing and seeing close up is as different as night and day. Let me know if your experience on this is otherwise.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    A view from higher elevation

    by SLLiew Written Jul 26, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you are fit and fairly unafraid of height, take care and climb up the steps of many of the temples.

    The view from the top is different. You will see the layout of the temple complex and horizon beyond to appreciate better the size and planning involved.

    If not, give your camera to someone going up there to take a few shots for you.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Straggling tree roots in Ta Prohm

    by SLLiew Written Jul 26, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Another must take photo of course is the giant trees growing over the temples, example the famous ones at Ta Prohm.

    It is unfortunate, many of the trees are dying or cut with their remnant roots left. They will not be there forever and so take your photos while they last.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    One of my favorite picture spot

    by SLLiew Written Jul 26, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I was amazed by the narrow gateway with a bridge with warrior heads on both sides that leads into Angkor Thom and Angkor Thom.

    Make sure you stop here to enjoy the view if it is not part of your tour. Another must Kodak spot to take a photo of this dramatic gateway.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Avoid the crowd

    by SLLiew Written Jul 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: As Angkor Wat has become a major world tourist destinations, it is impossible to avoid the crowd and hordes of noisy tourists completely.

    Checked with your concierge or tour guides, the less busier time or less comonly visited temples. Also sunrise, sunset and cooler mornings and late afternoons are peak time.

    You can take advantage of lunch time, hot periods of the day or when it is raining to have fewer other tourists to jostle with.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Restored back block by block

    by SLLiew Written Jul 26, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Many of the temples were neglected and pieces strewn all over. Others were damaged by nature or man. So it was fantastic that many international organizations have spent years to carefully document pieces, repaired, replaced and restored them into their past splendor.

    So I could see cut lines of blocks on many walls and statues as they were removed and put back again. Initially I was disappointed that there not in their original pristine state.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Poverty in Cambodia

    by SLLiew Written Jul 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of the things I cannot forget about Cambodia is the visible poverty.

    Tourism has become a major earner and as a typical tourist, we often spent most of tourist dollars on major hotels, airlines, tour agencies which are owned by richer, elite and top business community of the country.

    So it is a great idea to allocate part of your travel budget to buy souvenir directly from the local poor. You can always give your souvenir away to friends, colleagues as gifts or Christmas presents.

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  • bkarjee's Profile Photo

    Angkor Wat Conservation efforts

    by bkarjee Written Jan 28, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Angkor WAT conservation and restoration efforts are on, in coordination with Apsara authority of Cambodia and UNESCO. Angkor Wat is one of the UNESCO World heritage sites and funds keep pouring from UNO and many countries.

    The UNESCO's help in the conservation efforts
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • runwitme's Profile Photo

    Forms To Fill At The Airport

    by runwitme Updated Dec 25, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: No visa is required for Malaysians who make short visit Cambodia.
    You need to fill in two forms - one for immigration and the other one for custom declaration.

    For those flying AirAsia, get these forms from the check-in counter at LCCT, KLIA.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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