Angkor Thom, Angkor Wat

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    Early morning at The Bayon

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    first rays of light hit The Bayon

    The Bayon is justifiably one of the most popular sights of all the Angkor temples, with most of its thirty-seven towers adorned with four huge stone faces that seem to be a combination of Buddha and Jayavarman VII. Actually, there seems to be a lot of debate as to just who the faces represent, ranging from Loksvara, Bodhisattva, Buddha or builder Jayavarman. Dating back to the late 12th century, it is an architectural jumble due to its piecemeal construction, but the power of its many faces is lost on no one that ventures here despites the crowds. The red hues of late afternoon are special but it is also the most crowded time. We liked the temple so much that we went back a few times as it has a very convenient location to the food stalls. Early morning seemed the best combination of good light and not too many tourists.

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    Smilling Faces Of Bayon

    by dfactor Updated May 21, 2005

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    Smilling faces of Bayon

    One of my favorite temples in Siem Reap, the other being Angkor Wat. Angkor is good to look at from afar, once you're inside, apart from the brilliant Bas relief that spans almost 800m in length, there is nothing much to look at (The uppermost level is a good place to read in the morning, as I did on my intro page).
    Bayon is totally different. You can't tell much when you are approaching Bayon from the road. In fact, it is almost like a pile of rubble. But once inside, you will be awed by the faces all over the temples. It's this surreal feeling, walking around and everywhere you turn, these faces looking at you, smilling gracefully.
    I stopped by Bayon twice on different day but due to bad time management almost the same time in 2 days. I should have go to Bayon in the morning and see the sun lighting up the faces one by one as it moves higher up in the horizon.

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    Terrace of the Elephants

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    pachydermous supremous

    The Terrace of the Elephants is hard to miss. You’ll likely be dropped off here right after you spend your first morning trying to capture Angkor Wat’s sunrise and romping around The Bayon in the early morning light. In midday, it’s a hot affair as there is little shade to protect you and for this reason as well as better photographic light, it’s best to time your visit before noon. To avoid the tour buses, one good strategy is to get dropped off at nearby Baphuon and walk there via Phimeanakas. You’re still likely to be gawking at the imposing two and a half meter wall of pachyderms with lots of new friends, but at least you have more a feeling that you “discovered” it all on your own.

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    Phimeanakas

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    all in all, it's just another brick in the wall

    Part of the appeal of the Angkor Thom complex is you can wander around from temple to temple without the aid of your driver. In the early morning, it wasn’t too hot and really not all that crowded. You have to remember, that many people only come for one day and they tend to investigate only the most popular temples. Even though Phimeanakas is right in the thick of things, we found it pretty much empty and the views from the top were quite remarkable. The early 11th century structure is a bit lackluster with few surviving carvings but its legend is interesting enough, having been inhabited by a serpent that routinely transformed into a woman that the kings were “required” to make love to every night!

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    Bas-reliefs in Bayon

    by dfactor Updated May 23, 2006

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    Outer Bas-relief in Bayon

    Bayon has great Bas-reliefs. There are 2 galleries, the inner gallery and outter gallery. I missed the inner gallery on my 1st visit, went back there the following day for it. Reading Lonely Planet staring at the Bas-reliefs could take a good hour at the minimum. Plan your time wisely.
    The outter wall depict scenes of everyday life in ancient Khmer.

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    Terrace of the Leper Kings

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    intricate carvings abound

    The Terrace of the Lepers is nearly as impressive for the many debates about its name’s origin as it is for its many deeply carved mythological figures. Whether the name comes from the lichen-eaten condition of the statue atop it or it being of the leper king of Khmer legend, it is hard to argue with the elaborate detailed carvings that date back to the late 12th century.

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    Thommanon

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    a well preserved gem

    Thommanon was built between the late 11th and early 12th centuries in much the same style as Angkor Wat and is generally in good condition. It is much visited due to its central location, but well worth a gander for its setting against a photogenic jungle backdrop. With a shortage of time, many people just pop in for a quick photo so if you want to linger a bit, you’re bound to get the place to yourself in no time at all. It’s an easy stop between the Angkor Thom and the remainder of the Grand Circuit as you exit the Victory Gate.

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    Preah Palilay

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    a lush jungle setting provides respite from sun

    Preah Palilay is another nice temple to stumble upon as you walk around Angkor Thom and with its shady jungle setting, a cool place to while away some time in respite of the merciless Cambodian sun. A late 12th century temple in The Bayon style, it is surprisingly not so crowded despite its proximity to many must sees of Angkor.

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    Angkor Thom

    by iwys Updated Apr 12, 2007

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    Angkor Thom was my favourite part of Angkor. It has an episodic history which seemed far more comprehensible to me than many of the other Angkor sites'.

    Angkor Thom means Great City. It was built around 1200AD and at one time it enclosed an area of 9 square kilometres and had a population of 100,000. It originally consisted of the royal palace, the harem and the thousands of tiled and thatched citizens' houses which surrounded them, and beyond those, the paddy fields which supported the population.

    Around Angkor Thom is a wall with five great entrance gates. Inside are the site of the royal palace, the great square, the Bayon, the Baphuon, Phimeanakas pyramid, the Elephant Terrace and the Leper King Terrace.

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    The South Gate of Angkor Thom

    by iwys Updated May 8, 2007

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    1 more image

    The South Gate is probably where you will enter Angkor for the first time. It is one of the five gates to Angkor Thom. The road leading to the gate is lined with 108 stone statues, 54 on each side. 108 was a sacred number in Mahayana Buddhism. The 54 on the left side are heavenly devas, while the 54 on the right are underwold asuras. Many of these are originals, but some are copies.

    The South Gate itself is a massive stone portal, 23 metres high. It was made this high to enable mounte elephants to pass through. There was once a golden head on top of the gate, but this was looted by Siamese invaders.

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    Angkor Thom

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 18, 2004

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    Statues along Angkor Thom

    Angkor Thom was a massive walled city, which conatined the Bayon, amongst other temples. The wall around the city still remains in great condition. Unfortunately, the modern age keeps encroaching upon the ruins. A paved road now runs directly through one of the walls portals.

    Here is a picture of the great statues that line the road, ending in Angkor Thom's wall.

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    The Bayon

    by iwys Updated May 8, 2007

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    The Bayon is at the centre of Angkor Thom. It's nickname is the "hide-and-seek gallery", because there are so many galleries, covered walkways and dark passages in the lower levels that it would be a good place to play hide-and-seek.

    Work started on this Buddhist temple at the end of the twelfth century and it took twenty years to build. It is famous for its giant, stone, smiling faces. These are believed to be representations of Lokesvara, combined with the features of King Jayavarman VII, the last great ruler of Angkor before it fell into decline. Lokesavara is revered in Mhayan Buddhism as the Bodhisattva of compassion.

    Why has a got a smile on his face? Perhaps he had just visited Phimeanakas.

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    The Bayon 2

    by iwys Updated May 8, 2007

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    Originally there were 54 stone towers, with four heads on each side. 37 of these towers are still standing. The central tower is the tallest with a height of 43 metres. The heads themselves are around 3 metres high. It is possible that they were influenced by Buddhist brick towers in Bengal, which also had stone heads on them.

    It hs been suggested that the towers represented the different provinces of the Khmer Kingdom, and King Jayavarman's all-seeing power over them.

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    Angkor Thom

    by SirRichard Updated Sep 12, 2003

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    One of the Gates

    Angkor Thom is the name of the ancient city area, where the royal palace was, the main temples, the Terraces... It is a square area with 5 gates (one for each cardinal point) adorned with huge faces (see pic).
    Inside Angkor Thom you will find:
    - The Bayon temple
    - Terrace of the elephants
    - Terrace of the Leper King
    - Phimeanakas Temple
    - Baphuon
    - North and South Kleang...

    Here were shot some scenes of the Tomb Raider film :-)

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    The Bayon

    by SirRichard Written Sep 15, 2003

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    Me at the Bayon

    This is the temple located in the middle of the Angkot Thom complex.
    From the outside it seems a bit shapeless, not very interesting. BUT as you enter you will discover many engravings in the lower floors and the famous "Bayon faces" (3 meter high faces carved in stone) in the upper floors.

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