Fun things to do in Angkor Wat

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Angkor Wat

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    Peek at Kampuchea

    by Assenczo Updated Feb 11, 2014

    Kampuchea (the old name of Cambodia, still in use between the locals) is out there to be noticed in the little gaps of time en route to yet another monument. A knowledgeable tuk-tuk driver may take you through some back roads to have a look at rural life with its most prominent feature – the water buffalos. They are beasts of burden used extensively in the rice cultivation but when not burdened they know how to enjoy a puddle or a canal full of water. In some instants if not frightened they submerge totally with only their horny heads sticking out of the murky liquid.
    Cambodians in the area of Angkor are naturally employed by the tourist business. Most of them, including children (despicable state of affairs) are touts trying to sell trinkets and textiles. As always in the so-called developing world sales and begging are fusing together for best effect. Alongside the Angkor boulevards tents are set up in order to shelter music bands formed by people who have been maimed during the wars. It is such a pity to see them not taken care of by the people responsible for their state and having to beg for money (the begging is thinly veiled by sales). Outside of the high pressure points locals produce sugar candies made of palm extract or simply enjoy some free time by swinging on tree brunches.

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    In the grip of Nature

    by Assenczo Updated Feb 11, 2014

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    One of the most impressive features of the monuments of Angkor is their state of cohabitation with Nature. It has been an ebb-and-flow process depending on the human activity in the area. Nowadays there are the two factors pulling in opposite directions – one of them is the desire for restoration of the buildings to their original state and the other one is the quest to leave the structures as close to the condition they were during the period of neglect as possible. As usual, the middle ground is the best solution. In some areas of Angkor people can witness the power of nature stomping on presumed human prowess quite effortlessly while in other places workers armed with cranes and chisels have cleared the vegetation completely. As a result one has the opportunity to enjoy the best of the two worlds.

    Ta Prohm Ta Prohm Ta Som Preah Khan
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    Angkor The Cat-Walk

    by Assenczo Updated Feb 11, 2014

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    Angkor is certainly a major monument to human endeavour and central to any appreciation of human achievement. As experience shows it can also be used as a background just as well as center stage. Many female visitors find it obligatory to take their best wardrobe pieces and flaunt them in front of the cameras with Angkor silhouettes behind. And it is a very serious business requiring high-end cameras with lengthy lenses and two university degrees to master them. What follows is the quest for the perfect sexy pose that is going to drive their Facebook friends green with envy on at least two counts. Some seasoned camera lovers (stars in somebody's books) even employ professional crews and have the power to cordon off desirable sections of the buildings so they look solo on top of heaven!

    How was I? Wait! Catwalk traffic jam Quick to learn!
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    On your own

    by Assenczo Written Feb 11, 2014

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    The crowd control machine in Angkor works perfectly. All the bus tours have a compact itinerary and they have to show only the best the complex has to offer. Under time constraints the tour groups have to choose from a lengthy nomenclature and the main picks generally are: Angkor Wat itself as the most astounding piece of architecture, Ta Prohm as the jungle haunt, the Bayon with its photogenic multyheaded presence and of course Bantei Srei for its almost impeccable condition and intricate carving. Most of the rest is very much underrated which is ideal for some folks who want to see Angkor monuments in their more natural state of abandonment. A perfect example for a location with attributes such as serenity, mystery or solitude, the North Kleang within Angkor Thom is difficult to beat.

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    Entrance Ticket

    by stevemt Updated Apr 14, 2013

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    The entrance ticket is purchased before you get to the temple complex.

    The ticket office site is very busy. You get you photo taken and that is included on your ticket.

    There are various tickets, a daily, 3 days in one week, and more days in one month.

    Make sure you know what you need.

    It is really too much to do in 3 consecutive days unless you are fit, I would suggest getting the 3 day in one week and having a rest day or 2, your legs will thank you for it.

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    Thommanom

    by stevemt Updated Mar 14, 2013

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    This is a real small ruined Temple not far from Angkor Thom victory gate.

    It was really nice to visit a tiny complex for a change.

    Constructed late 11th - early 12th century C.E. as a hindu temple by Surayavarman 11.

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    Chau Say Thevoda

    by stevemt Updated Mar 14, 2013

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    Another is a real small ruined Temple not far from Angkor Thom victory gate.

    Again, it was really nice to visit a tiny complex for a change.

    This temple was built early 12th century C.E. by Suryavarman 11 as a Hindu temple.

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    Ta Keo

    by stevemt Updated Mar 14, 2013

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    This Wat I only got 2 pics of, due to the staircase that needed climbing - I did not - you will see why.

    Constructed late 10th - early 11th century C.E. as a Hindu Temple by Jayavarnman V.

    The decoration of this temple seems to have abruptly stopped as apparently evidenced by the unfinished carvings.

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    Banteay Kdei

    by stevemt Updated Mar 14, 2013

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    This rambling complex is largely unrestored. Origionally there was another temple here, but this one was built over the top of it by Jayavarman V11 in late 12th - early 13th century C.E.

    Origionally a Buddhist Monastary.

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    East Mebon

    by stevemt Updated Mar 13, 2013

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    East Mebon was constructed by Rajendravarman 11, this temple was dedicated to Shiva in honor of the kings parents.

    It is a large temple mountain like ruin, rising three levels and topped by five towers.

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    Pre Rup

    by stevemt Updated Mar 13, 2013

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    Traditionally, believed to be a funeral temple, this is in fact the state home of Rajendravarman 11.

    Historically important as it was the 2nd temple to be built after the Khmer capitol returned to Angkor.

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    Angkor Wat

    by davidjo Written May 21, 2012

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    Just like to mention it is best to go as early as possible to avoid the crowds, and even a better idea to start at TA PROHM at Angkor Thom, mainly because all the tour groups seem to visit in a specific order, so i found it particularly busy late morning, but if you go early it will be practically deserted. Ta Prohm is the ruins that have been taken over by the jungle, a real impressive sight with the roots of trees spread over the ruins. Famous for the movie "Tomb-raider"

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    HIRE A TUK TUK TO GET ABOUT ANGKOR WAT

    by DennyP Written Dec 10, 2011

    ANGKOR WAT
    To travel all around the huge site of Angkor Wat and also the vast complexes of Angkor Thom it is neccesary to get a 1 day or three day ticket..This is a really large complex of archaelogical temple ruins and if you really want to see it for what it is you cannot view all these places in one day. I decided to get the three day ticket and to do this. I hired the local Tuk Tuk known locally as a"Moto Remorque". This is a motorcycle that pulls a very colourful and comfortable trailer behind which is the most practical and inexpensive way to get around the complex...I hired my "Moto" for three days and negotiated a good price. My price included hire for three full days ,hotel pick up, waiting at all sites visited ,and return to my hotel.The price will depend on your bargaining skills of course but it will be really cheap anyway. I found my driver to be punctual, no problem waiting for me as some sites are well off the road..and also very informative about what to see and info from local knowledge.
    *NOTE Always make sure that you have established a complete price for the days hire before starting your trip.

    MY THREE DAY HIRE MANY LOCAL THIS WAS DEFINATELY A GREAT CHOICE FOR HIRE THIS IS ONE OF MANY
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    Bapuon

    by schurman23 Updated Oct 15, 2011

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    The Bapuon is another mountain temple to resemble Mount Meru or the "center of the universe" under Hindu literature. It is located near the Bayon Temple and the Royal Palace area. It is actually under restoration, and somehow quite similar with the Bayon from the outside so we just made a pass and proceeded to our next destination.

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    Phimeanakas

    by schurman23 Updated Oct 15, 2011

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    This 5 storey pyramid temple is one of what remains of the Royal Palace. The guide didn't explain much when I asked where exactly was the Royal Palace. Maybe he's tired to explain any further or that we didn't hear him explain since were so exhausted and hungry from walking. Anyway here are the pics (lol).

    Epilogue: After reading the souvenir coffeetable book about Angkor Wat, I found out its really quite difficult to find the Royal Palace because its no longer there (hahaha). The Palace according to the book was made of wood and together with all other the ancient non-religious structures they all have rotten by this day and age. What remains therefore are the religious structures made of stones and the walls.

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