Ta Phrom, Angkor Wat

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  • Ta Phrom
    by CDM7
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    by tim07
  • Ta Phrom
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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Ta Phrom

    by richiecdisc Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    picturesque Ta Phrom

    Fast becoming one of the most popular of Angkor temples, Ta Phrom is a photographer’s paradise. Unlike many of Angkor’s ruins, Ta Phrom has been left mostly to nature’s whims and nowhere is this power more evident than in the massive trees’ stranglehold on many of the temple’s walls. It is typical to get there around midday due primarily to its location on the circuit as well as its dense jungle setting. It is easier to get photos at that time of day and the place is accordingly packed. We did this on our first visit and took lots of photos but decided to come here for sunrise on our last morning. We were very glad we did despite our driver’s insistence it was a waste of time due to the bad light there at that hour. We got there in total darkness and though it was admittedly spooky entering the gloomy ruins entirely on our own, we found a place to sit and immerse ourselves in the uproar of the early morning jungle rumble. A mad chirping of assorted birds fought mightily against an incessant buzz of insects that all but engulfed us. All too soon, the darkness we initially feared came to a fleeting end and the wave of sound subsided to a normal level as we gained use of our other senses and saw the first strains of light glimmer through the dense vegetation. We wandered around the mysterious setting entirely on our own; the solitude was a worthy tradeoff for the lack of photographic light. We managed to capture a few ominous shots just before the first visitors came and unexpectedly found us taking our leave.

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    Welcome to the jungle

    by King_Golo Updated Oct 21, 2008

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    Trees in Ta Prohm
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    Ta Prohm is yet another temple left to the jungle's devastating work. However, it's the most famous and most interesting. Giant trees grow everywhere in and on the temple remains. Even the outer walls are fully overgrown at some places. Ta Prohm is famous, so be prepared for hundreds of tourists strolling around the site. Fortunately, 99% of them will not leave the main axis - so it's a good idea to start by walking around not through the temple. You will have Ta Prohm almost for yourself and can walk back through the masses with a smile on your face. In the last years, these masses have brought problems to Ta Prohm: Many of the walls are about to collapse and stones that bore fine carvings earlier now show only the slightest traces of these. Thus, a lot of construction work is going on in Ta Prohm. The authorities seem to have noticed that leaving a temple to the jungle is a good idea, but only if it is still presentable to the tourists. This also means that several sideways are off limits to tourists. Respect this, as it is really not worth being buried under a pile of massive stones just for "one more photo from over there"!

    One more thing for the film freaks on VT: Scenes of "Lara Croft: Tomb Raider" were filmed here. Great scenery for a movie like that!

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    Lightening Strikes!

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 18, 2004

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    Tree that was hit!

    A tree was struck by lightening not more than a year ago, my guide told me, and the tree that was hit fell on part of the outer wall of the city. You can see this toward the left side of the complex as you walk from the front to the back. Be careful as the rubble is very loose. Also, obey the ropes! They are there for a reason! Oh, OK, I didn't either!

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    Ta Prohm History

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 18, 2004

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    A Temple at Ta Prohm

    You might take a look at Angkor Wat and the Bayon, and think, "What the hell happened to Ta Prohm?" Well, what you are seeing is exactly what the discoverers wanted. They decided to leave Ta Prohm untouched. It is therefore the closest representation of what most of the temples of Angkor looked like when they were found. The jungle that swallowed the rest of the temples continues to do so at Ta Prohm, even today. There are those who want to cut away the vines to help preserve the temple. For me, I would hate to see the temple completely destroyed, but I would hate worse to lose what only Ta Prohm offers, a glimpse into the past.

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    Lonely Planet Guy

    by Jmill42 Updated Mar 20, 2004

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    Lonely Planet Guy!

    If you haven't heard of the Lonely Planet travel book series, you're not a real traveler! On the cover of the SE Asia guidebook is a man amongst the vines and roots of a temple in Angkor. The temple is Ta Prohm, and the man is... this guy!!

    He hangs around everyday, and takes donations for posing in pictures with you. I decided to take a quick photo from a few feet away. Now, I feel guilty! Someone give him a dollar for me!

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    Ta Prohm

    by SirRichard Updated Sep 15, 2003

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    One of those trees (the temple is within)

    If you have seen the Tomb Raider movies or have dreamed of being Indiana Jones for a while, this temple will leave you a "deja-vu" sensation. It is all covered by huge trees whose roots spread from the roofs, falling by the walls as octopussies' tentacles...
    This is how most of the temples are supposed to have been all these years since its discovery in the 19th century, as they have been abandoned for centuries and the jungle has been slowly covering them.

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    Ta Prohm entrance

    by SirRichard Written Sep 15, 2003

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    The way to TaProhm

    From the entrance to the temple there is a long walk. You will find in the way many kids who offer themselves as guides. If you are not in a hurry, this might be a good way to know a little more about the place. It won't be expensive (don't give them more than 1 USD) and they can take you to the better places for astonishing pictures (those huge trees over the buildings and so)...

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    Ta Prohm's Central Courtyard

    by SirRichard Written Sep 15, 2003

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    More roots

    There are many interesting sights in Ta Phrom, but maybe the most famous place is the central courtyard with those amazing roots falling over the place.
    The cover picture of the Lonely Planet Guide was taken here, and you can see the old man of the pic, who is a guardian of the temple.

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    Ta Prohm

    by jrs1234 Updated Jan 20, 2004

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    Broken wall at Ta Prohm

    Ta Prohm is quite different to most of the other temples in Angkor in that elsewhere, all the vegetation and trees have been removed in the immediate vicinity of the temple, where as here it's been left in an overgrown state to some degree.

    It's a definite "must see" sight as a result. Wander around, and bring your camera as there are plenty of great shots to be taken - here's one of mine.

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    Ta Phrom

    by Jmill42 Updated Oct 28, 2008

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    Ta Phrom
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    By far the coolest place in the whole of Angkor, Ta Phrom is a captivating mixture of temple and jungle. With roots, literally, seemingly growing out the temple stone, you start to wonder if you are on some foreign planet. The green moss covering the temple stone adds to the feeling that, somehow, the temple is alive. It is such a visual marvel, it begs the question of whether or not to restore it like other temples have been. Certainly, I am a proponent of making sure the continually growing roots do not collapse the structure, but removing the jungle, so rooted (sorry) in the lore and stunning visual product would be a travesty.

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    Ta Prohm

    by pmarshuk Updated Mar 23, 2004

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    Ta Prohm is the temple which to a great extent has been left alone by archeologists. Mainly all they have done is clear paths for tourists so that there is still a lot of jungle in the ruins. This is one of the locations which features in the film Lara Croft:Tomb Raider. It was here that she saw the little girl directing her to the jasmine plant before she fell down the hole into the temple.

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    Walk a little way into the forest

    by monina_c Written Jul 28, 2008

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    Ta Phrom is always a part of the temple tour. Tourists oftentimes go straight to the main body of the temple but I suggest that you go a little off the path because there are interesting bits of fallen architecture that will give you the shivers.

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    Ta Prohm, The "Tomb Raider" Temple

    by Etoile2B Written Oct 1, 2007

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    Ta Prohm, the Jungle Temple
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    One of the most popular temples in Angkor is Ta Prohm, also known as the Jungle Temple. Ta Prohm was built for Jayvarman VII in the mid 12th to early 13th centuries. Its modern-day fame spread by it’s inclusion the recent “Tomb Raider” movies starring Angelina Jolie, because of which this temple is always high on any tourist list and is therefore crowded most of the day. I highly recommend visiting this site first thing in the morning if you’re looking to avoid the crowds. Since most people visit legendary Angkor Wat for sunrise Ta Prohm is generally quiet then. Our second day in Angkor we visited Ta Prohm second, after sunrise at Sras Srang and a quick trip to Banteay Kdei, allowing us to explore this breathtaking site in relative calm.

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    Surprise painting purchase at Ta Prohm

    by thedouglas Written Jun 8, 2006

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    Ta Prohm artist

    One of my unexpected and enjoyable experiences at Ta Prohm was chancing upon this young artist, who had travelled from Battambang. He had a small folio of pictures from variuos parts of Angkor Wat. However, I wanted the one he was still working on - 5 days work - asking price US$35! He was painting a beautiful watercolour scene inside the temple, capturing the knarled roots covering the walls of the temple. Just beautiful.

    Agreed on the price - no money exchanged - and, as agreed, he turned up at our guesthouse with the painting - gave him US$40 - and we was a happy chappy. I got a beautiful painting of one of my most favourite places - an original no less!

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    Ta Prohm

    by bellatrix Written Mar 29, 2003

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    Ta Prohm

    Ta Prohm was perhaps my favorite temple. It is only partially restored; excavators decided to sacrifice one temple to the forest in order to allow visitors to experience what it must have been like to find these forgotten temples themselves. Large trees grow out of crevices and slowly break the temples apart. It's amazing to see the trees growing through, or on top of these stone structures.

    Ta Prohm was built during the reign of Jayavarman VII, a great king who reconquered the Khmer empire from Cham invaders in the years 1177-1181. Needless to say, the war caused great damage to the ancient capital of Angkor. The ambitious king set about making it into a proper seat of power by ordering the reconstruction of a number of temples. Ta Prohm was the centerpiece of his masterplan, located roughly in the center of the capital. Though the temple covers barely 2.5 acres, its walls and moat encompass 148 acres, which would have sheltered a town attached to the temple. Here, 12,640 people lived, supported by a population of 79,365 who worked in nearby villages to provide food and supplies.

    Ta Prohm housed the deity Prajnaparamita, the "perfection of wisdom." It was consecrated in 1186. Like many Khmer kings, Jayavarman had it carved in the likeness of his mother. The Prajnaparamita statue was surrunded by 260 lesser divinities, housed in their own sanctuaries.

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