Phumi Siem Reab Favorites

  • Limosine at Sokha Angkor Resort, Siem Reap
    Limosine at Sokha Angkor Resort, Siem...
    by victorwkf
  • Favorites
    by victorwkf
  • Mr.Sokphai
    Mr.Sokphai
    by balisunshine

Most Recent Favorites in Phumi Siem Reab

  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Books about the Angkor temples

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 3, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ancient Angkor

    Favorite thing: Many books have been written about the Angkor temples, but “Ancient Angkor” by Michael Freeman and Claude Jacques was recommended to me by our Angkor-guide. I have read the book and it was very interesting.

    There are books for sale all over the temple area or in Siem Reap.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Limosine at Sokha Angkor Resort

    by victorwkf Updated Aug 3, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Limosine at Sokha Angkor Resort, Siem Reap
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: When I was at Sokha Angkor Resort, there was this huge limosine at the entrance of the resort as shown in the photograph. Managed to take a few photos for rememberance.

    Apparently you can take a ride on this limosine from the resort to the airport, but it will cost a lot of money (I heard it was about US$70 one way).

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Luxury Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Free wifi at the airport in Siem Reap.

    by cachaseiro Written Feb 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I was pleasantly suprised to see that the little airport at Siem Reap has free wifi for it´s clients.
    It´s allready a quite pleasant airport for it´s small size and free wifi just ads to the feel good thing.
    No passwords or anything was needed in order to log on.
    Just open the laptop and find the network.

    Was this review helpful?

  • balisunshine's Profile Photo

    Understanding what it's all about

    by balisunshine Written Jun 20, 2009
    Mr.Sokphai

    Favorite thing: Visiting Angkor Wat
    is an amzing experience.

    A must!!

    But when visiting all these temple,
    it is helpful to have an official guide
    to give you some light on what
    it is that you are visiting.

    We were lucky to have
    Mr. Sokphai as our guide.

    He was very informative
    and accomodating.

    Mr. Sokphai
    Tel. (855) 17 68 06 99
    E-mail: sokphaicham@yahoo.com

    Was this review helpful?

  • gaolei's Profile Photo

    Go to Angkor Wat in the winter

    by gaolei Written Jun 19, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It will be high season, so book your hotel early and expect slightly higher prices. The best part of winter travel is the temperatures may be much better. I went there in January and found the temperature a little high, but easily tolerable. Most people who go in the hot season only stay at the temples until late morning and have to retreat to their hotel for the afternoon. I was able to stay all day with no problem.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Take a Ride Through the Cambodian Countryside

    by Etoile2B Written Oct 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The wedding procession.
    4 more images

    Fondest memory: One of our favorite days was our third day in Angkor. We knew nothing about the more remote sites in the park (Banteay Srey and Kbal Spean) but our driver, Happy, suggested a trip out. Since the sites are quite some distance from Siem Reap there’s a long drive through the Cambodian countryside to reach them. The ride, although bumpy and dusty as the majority of the roads this far out aren’t paved, gave us an unique opportunity to not only to view the beautiful landscape of this country, but to observe local customs and culture and interact with locals firsthand. We saw a wedding procession waking down the main street of a small village and Cambodian women paving a dirt road by hand. Local children helped push our tuk tuk across a makeshift bridge that had been “repaired” by depositing cement and pottery fragments into the hole. And we even got a peek inside the home of a family kind enough to let us use their bathroom. I had tried to pee on the side of the road behind a bush but some local children were so fascinated by us that they wouldn’t give me any privacy. We were greeted with warm smiles and friendly waves from all the people as we rode by in our tuk tuk and touched by the generosity and gracious nature of the Cambodian people.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Monkeys!!!!

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 30, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monkeys at Angkor
    4 more images

    Fondest memory: On the first day of our visit to the temples of Angkor we encountered a clan of monkeys on the road between Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom. Our tuk tuk driver pulled over to the side of the road to allow us to check them out. The monkeys were obviously used to people. They were friendly and permitted us to get rather close. They were eating bananas and there were babies hanging off their mothers and playing with each other. It was my first encounter with wild monkeys so it was truly a special treat! Keep your eye out for the monkeys during your visit to Angkor.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Monks & Nuns

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 17, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A monk paying hommage at Ta Keo.
    4 more images

    Fondest memory: Although Angkor Wat and the surrounding temples are ancient, they are still active religious sites. Any temple with an existing Buddha will be adorned by the faithful. There are active monasteries throughout and you will certainly see monks and nuns attending to these sites. Additionally, monks from outside Angkor make a regular pilgrimage to these holy sites so it is not unusual to encounter theme exploring the temples along side the other tourists. The monks and nuns in residence will allow you to participate in a blessing, for a donation, which is an unique experience. When encountering a monk or nun, please ask for permission before taking a picture, as some do not wish to be photographed. Many of the visiting monks, clad in their saffron robes, are here as part of a solemn religious pilgrimage, but as we learned, all Buddhist men must serve as a monk at least once in their life so some of the monks we encountered acted more like tourists than religious pilgrims and were just as excited to take pictures of and with other tourists as we were.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Bathrooms at Angkor Wat

    by Etoile2B Updated Sep 17, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Near the
    2 more images

    Fondest memory: There are several options for public bathrooms at Angkor Wat. If you are standing with your back to Angkor Wat there are vendors and food stalls are located to the right inside the complex. There is also an active monastery near the stalls with public bathrooms, but be sure you have money with you, as the children of the monastery will lead you to the bathrooms and then request payment, but this money goes to the monastery. There is also a public bathroom on the opposite side of the complex directly across from the monastery and vendors. This stall was free of charge and lacked tourists.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Children of Angkor

    by Etoile2B Updated Sep 17, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Cambodian boy at Ta Keo.
    4 more images

    Fondest memory: There are communities of people who actually live on the grounds of the temples of Angkor. They are the descendants of the peoples who built these majestic temples. The children of these people can be found hanging out in the temples or helping their parents at the stands selling their wares inside the complex. On our second day we met several children, most of them were trying to sell us a scarf or trying to get us to have breakfast at their parent’s stand. But we had a lot of fun with these kids. In the dark, while we were waiting for sunrise over Srah Srang, two little girls took my hand and guided me to the bathroom and back. They were such sweet girls that I was compelled to have breakfast with them and Marc had breakfast at another nearby stand with the kids he had befriended.

    Since many of the families make their money selling food or goods to the tourists visiting Angkor, these children will try and sell to you. They can be very persistent. Just simply tell them you are not interested. You may have to repeat this several times, but just don’t make any empty promises to shut them up. They will remember. But have fun and enjoy the beautiful children of Angkor during your visit.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aidy_p's Profile Photo

    Fill em' Up

    by Aidy_p Written Sep 6, 2007
    Essence of Life

    Favorite thing: It's a habit of mine to buy a big bottle of water. We'll normally leave this big bottle in the hotel room while topping up the smaller mineral bottles that we carry along with us during our day trip.

    This time though, our hotel provided us with two bottles of complimentary water daily, and that normally would be enough to last us for the day. But habits die hard. We still bought ourselves a bottle 1.5l of Bayon mineral water for 2,000kr, or about US$0.75.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aidy_p's Profile Photo

    Get Yourself An Angkor!

    by Aidy_p Written Sep 6, 2007
    Everything Matches...From the Bottle to The Mug

    Favorite thing: The first thing anyone can do is to try out the beer of that particular country that you are in. You need to be one with the country before you can enjoy the sights and sounds of the place, so why not start it off with a local beer?

    I thought the Angkor beer was a little too malty for my liking. But it still cooled me down after walking around the markets with the sun at full blaze.

    Things here are much more expensive than in Vietnam. I paid US$2 for a bottle of Angkor beer whereas you can get a bottles of vietnam's 333 beer for less than US$1!

    Was this review helpful?

  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    Quick Grasp of Recent Cambodian History

    by xuessium Updated Aug 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    KingSihamoni(photoextractedfromweb)

    Favorite thing: 1970 Kingdom of Cambodia overthrown in coup by General Lon Nol. Neutrality in Vietnam War abandoned. Country renamed Khmer Republic.

    1975 Ultra-Marxist Khmer Rouge under Pol Pot overthrew Lon Nol's corrupt and inept government. Went about to create an utopian state through a reign of terror. Country renamed Democratic Kampuchea. Prince Norodom Sihanouk was briefly re-instated as Head-of-State before fleeing in 1976, fearful for his life.

    1979 Much hated Khmer Rouge government overrun by invading Vietnamese forces. War had begun in 1977 when the Khmer Rouge attacked their Marxist comrades across the border. A puppet regime under Heng Samrin, called the Peoples' Republic of Kampuchea was installed. Not recognized by the UN.

    1979-1989 A coalition of forces (including the Khmer Rouge), recognising Prince Sihanouk as leader, represented Cambodia in the UN.

    1989 Vietnamese forces retreated. Country renamed State of Cambodia.

    1993 The UN sponsored peace process brought peace back to wartorn Cambodia. Country was once again Kingdom of Cambodia and Prince Sihanouk was re-crowned King.

    1997 2nd Prime Minister Hun Sen seized absolute power through a coup e'tat. 1st Prime Minister Prince Norodom Ranariddh fled the nation.

    1998 Ranariddh returned to Cambodia and after the 1998 election, became Chairman of the National Assembly. Hun Sen consolidated his power and became sole Prime Minister.

    2004 Sihanouk abdicated in favour of his younger son Norodom Sihamoni

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • School Holidays

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aidy_p's Profile Photo

    Airport Departure Tax: Pay For Having A good Time

    by Aidy_p Updated Aug 20, 2007

    Favorite thing: So you've visited all the temples, took a boat ride on Tonle Sap, enjoyed a beer or two at Pub Street. Now it's time to pay up.

    Before you leave Siem Reap, you'll need to fork out US$25. I guess to sustain their balinese-inspired airport.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aidy_p's Profile Photo

    Visa: To Pay or Not To Pay?

    by Aidy_p Written Aug 20, 2007

    Favorite thing: Have searched on the web for an answer but was not able to get an affirmation. So here's what I've learnt.

    ASEAN tourists do not need to apply for a visa. you should head straight to the immigration counter instead of turning left for those who require to apply for Visa.

    For the rest, you will need to have a 4x6 photo and US$20 for the Visa. Remember to bring along that photo or else it will be more troublesome as you'll be directed to take a photo and things may just get delayed.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Phumi Siem Reab

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

Phumi Siem Reab Favorites

Reviews and photos of Phumi Siem Reab favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Phumi Siem Reab sightseeing.

View all Phumi Siem Reab hotels