Phumi Siem Reab Off The Beaten Path

  • Sugar palm fruit and its candy derivative
    Sugar palm fruit and its candy...
    by stamporama
  • Preparing the candies
    Preparing the candies
    by stamporama
  • Got unleaded?
    Got unleaded?
    by stamporama

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Phumi Siem Reab

  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    "Even Pol Pot had sh*tty days"

    by King_Golo Updated Oct 11, 2014

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    Now this is a really weird sight: Cambodia's former dictator Pol Pot's toilet seat!
    As you might know, Pol Pot was "Brother No. 1" of the Khmer Rouge and as such responsible for the murder of 2 million people! He formed a communist guerilla organisation and eventually managed to come to power. His idea of communism was that of an archaic rural communism - farming and nothing else. This combined with the idea that every intellectual should be killed led to the country's most horrible years with the population starving and a paranoid murderer as the most important figure in government. Only in 1978, when Vietnam invaded the country, Pol Pot could be removed from power. However, the Khmer Rouge continued fighting a guerilla war from the jungle for many years. Pol Pot died in 1998 and never served any sentence.
    The toilet seat that was once in his house was "rescued", as a plaque says, when the house was demolished in January 2000. Now preserved in Ivy Guesthouse and Bar, this is probably the strangest sight I've ever come across.

    The seat of power for many years
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  • stamporama's Profile Photo

    Guess what this woman is selling

    by stamporama Written Aug 1, 2009

    At first I thought she was selling a drink of some kind, maybe a local beer like 'bia hoi' in Hanoi. But when I asked our guide, he said she was selling gasoline! Since gas stations were few and far between, enterprising vendors sell petrol to motorcycle owners who usually buy a few liters. Note that the pump here is hand-cranked and is devoid of any fire safety features.

    There's got to be a safer way to earn money!

    Got unleaded?
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  • stamporama's Profile Photo

    Local candy

    by stamporama Written Aug 1, 2009

    On the road to/from Banteay Srei, there are roadside stalls that sell candies made from sugar palm trees that grow in the area. I sampled one and it was VERY sweet, it was like gulping a whole tablespoon of white sugar! Try and buy it if you want, but it's not something I'd bring home as a gift.

    Sugar palm fruit and its candy derivative Preparing the candies
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  • Carino's Profile Photo

    Cambodian Landmine Museum

    by Carino Written Nov 1, 2008

    The Cambodian Landmine Museum is located 6km south of Banteay Strei inside the Angkor Wat Archeological Park.

    It has been funded by the Relief Fund with the same name and by Aki Ra. Aki Ra was a soldier for Khmer Rouge and has planted a lot of Landmines during that time. Since then he is donating his life to find and dismantle landmines all over Cambodia. The museum is quite small and with the movie it should take you not more than 1 hour to see all the exhibitions.

    Entry Fee is a 1 USD donation admission that supports sustainable land mine relief and community development initiatives. Considering that there are still millions of landmines and UXOs all over Cambodia, every dollar counts.

    What striked me most about this museum was to learn about the fact that countries like Finland, China, India, Russia, Korea, Singapore, USA and many others are either still producing landmines or have not signed the Ottawa Treaty.

    Opening Hours:
    Open Daily from 7.30am to 5.30pm

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    A Sad Little Zoo

    by Etoile2B Written Oct 3, 2007

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    Sadly I don’t know whether to list this here or under ‘Warnings or Dangers’. Walking up to the trailhead at Kbal Spean we noticed a zoo. We wanted to hike up to the lingas before the sun got too hot so we decided to check it out on the way back down. The gates were slightly ajar and there wasn’t another soul in site but we entered anyway. This was a pitiful excuse for a zoo and the few poor souls imprisoned here were horribly neglected. I wish there had been some way to liberate the crane and monkeys, sadly their cages were locked so all we could do it pity the poor unfortunate souls housed here.

    A sad little monkey. The sad little zoo. Me with a sad little monkey. Communing with the monkey. A sad little monkey.
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  • rainbowseeker's Profile Photo

    Kompong Plouk, the flat forest

    by rainbowseeker Updated Oct 1, 2007

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    This is another Tonle Sap "cruise" which takes the floating village experience to a new level. The trip starts at the same boat station as the floating village trip but you need to take a boat for about an hour into the lake. Costs more, about $45 but of course that is the cost of the boat and skipper. More people cheaper per head. I have to confess that my ever faithful guide Sopheap carried out negotiations on my behalf. You will pass the floating village and continue further down the lake till you reach the Cambodian fishing village of Kompong Plouk. You can walk around the village, visit the pagoda and change into a small wooden boat with a native paddler who takes you on a tour of the waterside of the village and among the trees of the flooded forest, a truly magical experience. Needless to say you can only make this trip when water levels are high.
    The people of the village are friendly but not pushy and go about their everyday lives. The mad scramble of screaming children chasing frogs in the woodpile was a bonus.

    An aquatic idyll Lakeside view of family at home Hunting frogs in the woodpile Frogs ready for the pot Into the trees by boat
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  • Aidy_p's Profile Photo

    From Palm Tree to Edible Palm Sugar

    by Aidy_p Updated Aug 11, 2007

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    You can make a stop at one of the villages along the way to or back from Bateay Srey.

    Quite a bit of effort is used to extract the sugar from the palm fruit. After all the plucking, extracting of the fruits, and lots of heating and stirring, you will get palm sugar that you can eat directy, or use to make dessert.

    Our driver, Thara asked us to try, and even though those guide books mentioned that we should not be trying anything other than hotel food, the explorer in me told me to try it. Nice, but a little too sweet. Importantly, nothing happened to my stomach. Not with this food.

    Yummy Palm Sugar First the Palm Tree Then Remove the Fruits Extract the Palm Juice and Boil

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  • Beng Mealea

    by LoveBeLL Written Jul 25, 2007

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    If you have an extra day or at least half a day to spare, do arrange for a trip to Beng Mealea. Out of the 4 of us girls on the trip, 3 of us picked this as the best out of all the Angkor temples visits.

    Reason probably because we get to climb all over the ruins and be our own version of Indiana Jones and Lara Craft.

    We understood from our driver that Angelina Jolie filmed Tomb Raider there for 3 mths beside filming for a week at Ta Prohm.

    You can either explore on your own or if you want, there are some guides there that you can hire. I'm not sure how much it cost as we decided to explore on our own and almost made a complete circle of the place except for the last part when we weren't sure if the path will lead us to the exit so we went back the same way we got in.

    Go before they decide not to let anyone climb on the ruins anymore.

    Related to:
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    • Archeology

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  • rainbowseeker's Profile Photo

    Try your hand as teacher in village school

    by rainbowseeker Written Mar 7, 2007

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    Savong is a young Khmer who set up a school to teach young children languages outside their normal schooling. A New Zealand business man found out about the school and built a school building and funds the 3 teachers. This generous gesture means that the children do not pay for the lessons which help them to aspire to higher paid jobs.Visitors are welcomed, you can make a cash contribution or gifts of pens, pencils footballs etc appreciated.
    I contacted Savong before my visit and he asked me to give an English lesson to the children. Thai and Japanese are also taught. Questions from the teachers to me on points of English grammar were very testing! The lesson is to a subject of your choice and the staff are with you to keep you out of trouble. The whole experience was a joy and you feel that the children are keen to learn and are very attentive and perfectly behaved.
    I received a lovely "thank you" speech from one of the children which ended "How grateful we are that someone so old as you has spared his time to talk to these young Khmer children"!
    Joyful experience give it a go. I'm already planning to go back on my next visit

    Blowing up my teaching aid, Inflatable globe Teacher tries out the desk for size, very small Teacher at work
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  • hez28's Profile Photo

    Cleaner kids at the Siem Reap River

    by hez28 Updated Feb 7, 2007

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    At the Siem Reap River you will see kids cleaning the river. I saw a group of boys whom I thought were just hanging around and playing there. I walked closer to them and saw that they were actually cleaning the river.

    These kids are getting paid to do it. They said it’s their income, and that they enjoy it. I could tell though that they were having fun, they liked the attention that I gave them and didn’t mind answering the many questions that I asked :D

    Related to:
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    • Castles and Palaces

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  • bkarjee's Profile Photo

    The artificial lake around the Angkor Wat Temple

    by bkarjee Written Jan 5, 2007

    The Angkor wat temple is surrounded by a man made lake on all the 4 sides and there are two walkways (one on the east, and one on the west. Latter is the main entrance) that connect the island to the mainland. These lakes provide a cooling sensation and provide a nice backdrop to the temples. The landscape looks beautiful. When I went there, I saw lot of Apsara Authority cleaners cleaning up the weeds from the lake.

    Cleaners cleaning up the lake around AngkorWat Tem
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  • muddybok's Profile Photo

    Roluos Group - Bakong

    by muddybok Updated Sep 1, 2006

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    The picture shows the Bakong, the most impressive member of the Roluos Group. It's not as old or grand as Angkor Wat, still the Pyramid shaped mountain-temple is quite impressive.

    Beside Bakong, you can also visit Lolei, Preah Ko and other smaller temple ruins.


    Roluos' monuments or The Roluos group lies 15 kilometers south-west of Siem Reap and includes three temples - Bakong, Prah Ko and Lolei - dating from the late 9th century and corresponding to the ancient capital of Hariharalaya, from which the name of Lolei is derived. Remains include 3 well-preserved early temples that venerated the Hindu gods.

    Bakong
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  • euzkadi's Profile Photo

    Banteay Srei

    by euzkadi Written Oct 3, 2005

    This small and beutiful temple is located 28 kms northeast of Bayon Temple. It has one of the most beautiful reliefs of the Kmer art. It was constructed by king Jayavarman 5th, and was constructed by women. It was banned for tourism due to problems with the Khmer Rouge guerrilla.

    Related to:
    • Archeology

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  • muddybok's Profile Photo

    Rice Field

    by muddybok Updated Jul 16, 2005

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    Rice is the major export for Cambodia & most of the rice were organically grown with limited usage of fertilizer & pesticide.

    My tuk-tuk driver taken this shortcut from Westerm Mebon-Siem Reap Airport & passes by some really nice rice fields.

    Rice Field
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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    Try A Palm Sugar

    by xuessium Written Mar 4, 2005

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    You get these families cooking palm sugar in their houses and then selling them in packs just outside their houses. You will see these makeshift stalls all along the way on the roads to Angkor, especially the road to Bantaey Srei. They cost only US$1 and they taste very sweet. Try them and have something sweet to remember Siem Reap-Angkor with.

    CookingPalmSugar
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