Ruines d' Angkor Travel Guide

  • Ruines d' Angkor
    by blueskyjohn
  • Apsara dancer
    Apsara dancer
    by ValbyDK
  • Srah Srang Reservoire at Sunrise
    Srah Srang Reservoire at Sunrise
    by gdilieto

Ruines d' Angkor Things to Do

  • Baksei Cham Krong

    Baksei Cham Krong means, The bird that shelters under its wings. The legend is that during an attack on Angkor, the king was sheltered by a large bird that spread it's wings and saved the king.Baksei Cham Krong is only one temple. It is constructed out of different materials you see at Angkor Wat. Not many people take the time to pull over and walk...

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  • Ta Prohm - The Temple Swallawed by the...

    Ta Phrom is, with Angkor Wat and the Bayon, one the most-celebrated temples of Angkor, definitely a must-see site as part of the trilogy above. If Angkor Wat impresses by the grandeur of its architecture, and the Bayon does it by its enigmatic symbolism, Ta Phrom impresses by its romantic atmosphere due to the astonishing merger of nature and...

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  • The Bayon - The Temple of the...

    Broadly known as "The temple of the face-towers", the Bayon is one of the most enigmatic and astonishing Angkor monuments, rivaling in greatness with Angkor Wat. While Angkor Wat impresses with its majesty and geometrical perfection, the Bayon does it with its feeling of mysterious and fantastic. Built by the Khmer at the peak of their civilization...

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  • Angkor Wat

    Angkor Wat is the biggest religious building in the world. It is bigger than any other temple in Asia, the Great Pyramid in Egypt or St. Peter’s in Rome. It is the grandest of all Khmer temples and, in its heydays, the complex was a city in its own right.Angkor Wat was built in the 12th century at the peak of the Khmer empire’s wealth and power....

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  • Banteay Samre

    Style and Dedication:One of the earlier temples, Banteay Samre was originally a Hindu sanctuary and followed the same architectural style as Angkor Wat, albeit obviously on a smaller scaleBuilder:Suryavarman II and Yasovarman II in the early to mid 12th century (although this is essentially a guesstimate, no actual indication of a date was...

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  • Ta Prohm

    Style and Dedication:Ta Prohm was built as a Mahayana Buddhism temple and university and as such is another one of the 'flat temples', with 5 retaining walls encircling a central sanctuary. Some of the structures have collapsed due to erosion/vegetation, but the layout is still fairly clear.Builder:Jayavarman VII, in late 12th/early 13th...

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  • Preah Khan

    Style and Dedication:The temple is a Mahayana Buddhism sanctuary, but with smaller shrines to Hindu deities around the main sanctuary as well (for a total of over 400 gods and goddesses). Rectangular galleries, courtyards and corridors around the main sanctuary make this a pleasant place to wander around.Builder:Jayavarman VII, in late 12th...

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  • Banteay Kdei

    Style and Dedication:One of the temples that was built as a Mahayana Buddhism temple/monastery straight away, the building is in the Bayon style with Angkor Wat influences (or vice versa, but personally I saw more of Bayon in it)Builder:Jayavarman VII, in late 12th-early 13th centuryDescription:As a Buddhist monastery, it was built on ground level...

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  • East Mebon

    Style and Dedication:As with many temples in Angkor area, the main deity here is the Hindu god Shiva, but it also honours the parents of the king. Style is similar to that of Pre Rup, and it is also a Mount Meru rappresentation.Builder:King Rajendravarman, in the 10th centuryDescription:Built primarily in sandstone and brick, the temple has two...

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  • Bakong

    Style & Dedication:Bakong represents the first application of the temple-mountain architectural formula on a grand scale, and featured all the same elements that have later come to characterise te temple mountain style (i.e., moats surrounding the pyramid).Builder:Started by Indravarman I, Bakong was the work of a number of kings, with the top...

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  • Sra Srang

    Builder:Kavindrarimathana, who was a minister during the reign of Rajendravarman II. It did not survive in its original shape though, having been modified by one of the most prolific builders - Jayavarman VII.Description:Not a temple this time around, but a reservoir of water with landings and some beautiful statues of nagas, garudas and a couple...

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  • Pre Rup

    Style and Dedication:Temple-mountain, representation of Mount Meru, which was surrounded by a moat representing an ocean. The principal deity of the temple is Shiva.Builder:Rajendravarman, around year 960 ADDescription:As with Ta Keo, there are five towers on the on the top level of the pyramid temple, one at the centre of the platform and one in...

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  • Ta Keo

    Style and Dedication:Temple-mountain in Khleang style, representation of Mount Meru, which was surrounded by a moat representing an ocean. The principal deity of the temple is Shiva.Builder:Jayavarman V, around year 1000 CEDescription:The temple, possibly the first to be built entirely of sandstone by Khmers, remains unfinished without much in the...

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  • Banteay Kdei: The Eastern Gate

    Walking through the the compound of Banteay Kdei, we followed the dirt path that led us towards the east gate. Looking pass the gate was a elongated structure known as Sra Srang - an artificial lake that would have been a lovely place to relax during the era of Jayavarman VII.

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  • Banteay Kdei: Great Symmetry

    Walking through a couple of carved doorways, I realised that it was a straight path with many doors in front of my path. It might not be anything special but it sure makes a lovely picture in terms of symmetry.

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  • Banteay Kdei: Nice Solid Window

    Check out the interesting stone windows with devatas carved out on either side. Also, the carved-out windows really look like a big picture frame. You can stick your face through it to have that specially framed picture.

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  • Banteay Kdei: The Untouched Temple

    Smack in between Ta Prohm and Sras Srang, Banteay Kdei is one of the more derelict temples in the Angkor region. Many stones lay around, and also, the stones forming the walkway are may not have been properly laid.But this temple is a true temple of "As it is". This may have been how it was found. So it feels rather special to walk through the...

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  • Ta Prohm: Handicap Musical Talents

    Traditional Khmer music feels the air as you walk out the east gate of Ta Prohm. It adds to the unique experience of visiting these traditional temples. The team of musicians dish out lovely sounds to entertain tourists and what they hope for in this impoverished nation, is a small donation to get them going.These musicians are actually war...

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  • Ta Prohm: Something Unique

    What is special about Ta Prohm is that the temples and the trees come together as one. But what is truly unique is that along the walkway, there's a little statue carving that the roots did not grow through it, but around it. Try to find that statue! ; )

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  • Ta Prohm: Chest Thumper

    Within the premises of Ta Prohm is a chest thumping location called Prasat Kuthrum. My guide told me that people with problems and are heavy hearted would stop by this building to thump their chest.Firstly, one would have to have their backs to the wall. Then start thumping your chest and what you hear would be the unique reverberation. Loud but...

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  • Ta Prohm: Intricate Carvings

    Like other temples, the walls of Ta Prohm are adorned with various carvings - Devatas, Apsaras and Animals. One interesting animal, if you can find on the wall, is a carving of a stegosaur. With this, questions are abound. Were there stegosaurus during the time of the carving somewhere around the 12th and 13th century? Were there other animals that...

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  • Ta Prohm: Inhabitants?

    There are so many temples to visit and many a times I do not recommend tour groups is because they would just ship you off from one destination to another. If you really want to experience the temple to the fullest, travel by yourself. Hire a guide if you think you want to hear more abou the temples. If not, a visitors' guide may be good enough.But...

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  • Ta Prohm: Temple Meets the Trees

    The temple had been abandoned since the fall of the Khmer empire in the 15th century and was only discovered about 500 years later. This allowed the Spung trees and other destructive trees such as Stranglers Figs to over-run the entire complex.

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  • Ta Prohm: Moat Around the Temple

    As what one can see when visiting the castles of Scotland, moats prove to be very effective form of protection against the enemies. It slows down the progress of the intruders and make it difficult for them to enter the compounds of the area once the main doors are closed.With the Khmer saying of "Where there's water, there's fish", I'd believe...

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Ruines d' Angkor Transportation

  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    by Maria81 Updated Apr 25, 2011

    The Angkor complex is quite far from Siem Reap hotels themselves, a – given the heat – the best way to get there is to hire a taxi. I've hired one for the duration of the stay, at about USD30 per day (plus the tip at the end). You can either arrange your own or have your hotel arrange one.

    The complex itself is vast, and the easiest way to get around is, again, the rental taxi. The easiest if to hire the taxi for the day when arranging transportation from Siem Reap to the complex in the morning – or even your entire duration. Otherwise on the busier days it might be a challenge to find a taxi to take you between the more remote of the temples

    The driver will wait for you at each of the temples and then take you to the following one. This would allow you to explore 3 to 5 temples a day, without over-stretching yourself. The driver can also advise you on when it's best to visit individual temples as at least mine was familiar with when the bigger groups would come and go.

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Ruines d' Angkor Tourist Traps

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    by Mel&Mike Written Nov 6, 2004

    You will often be surrounded by sweet and beseeching children, begging for you to buy things or to just give them money. They are lurking in the most unlikely places. Their English is great and its very difficult to say no.

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Ruines d' Angkor What to Pack

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    by akikonomu Written Oct 2, 2004

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Bring lots of suntan lotion and calamine (in case you get a sunburn). Personally, I think it's better off to have a long sleeve cotton blouse and scarf (especially to cover the nape). Suntan lotion mixed with lots of sweat is not nose-friendly.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Also don't forget the wide brimmed hat and sunglasses. An unbrella will also come in handy for the occasional showers during the wet season. And drink plenty of water. Get a small towel to towel off the excess sweat too.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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Ruines d' Angkor Off The Beaten Path

  • Ak Yum

    Style & Dedication:Stepped pyramid structure in brick, Ak Yum is probably the first example of the temple-mountain style. Inscriptions indicate that a temple dedicated to the Hindu ‘god of the depths’ was previously located on the same spot.Builder:First started in the second half of the 8th century, the temple was expanded during the reign of King...

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  • Krol Ko

    Builder:Built during the reign of Jayavarman VII.Description:Just north of Neak Pean, Krol Ko is a small temple with a single central tower surrounded by two walls. There are some interesting carvings with columns, apsaras and garudas, in particular along the enclosure wall. There are few tourists at Krol Ko, making it a refreshing break from the...

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  • Western Mebon

    Away from the Angkor area, the ruins of the temple stands on an island in the middle of the Western Baray reservoir.Access is possible only via boat and the original Hindu statue in the temple now stands at the National Museum in Phnom Penh.

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