Siem Reap Off The Beaten Path

  • Cambodian village.
    Cambodian village.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Cambodian village.
    Cambodian village.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Cambodian village.
    Cambodian village.
    by IreneMcKay

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Siem Reap

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    Floating village - TONLE SAP

    by balhannah Updated Feb 23, 2009

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    Went by tuk tuk to Tonle sap lake, return cost $8. It was the most bumpy road I had ever been on. Price of boat after a haggle, cost $20 for 11/2hours. It was an old boat, with not a very pleasant driver. The young man (guide) was nice. The river in April is very low, the lake is also. The village is interesting, you could see the children at school, a chemist, basket ball court on water, church, restaurants, fish farms, and local homes. The vietnamese live together, and the muslims together, they do not mix, and I was told by the guide, they do not like each other. As the tourist boats head out into the lake, teenager boat drivers, with very young children, speed after the boats and jump on to sell cans of drink.
    Worth the trip out.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Arts and Culture

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    Temples on the outskirts of Siem Reap

    by balhannah Written Apr 10, 2008

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    Roadside
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    A day to some of the lesser visited temples will cost $20 by tuk tuk. I went to Pre rup, Banteay srei, Banteay samre, east mebon, Ta som, Neak pean, Banteay Prei, and preah khan. These are worth a visit, they are all different, at least you don't have hordes of tourists in your photos. On the way, you pass through some nice villages, and see the village peoples way of life. an enjoyable day.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    The Land Mine Museum

    by JessieLang Updated Mar 5, 2011

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    The Land Mine Museum was started by a man named Aki Ra, who was a child soldier for the Khmer Rouge and forced to plant them. He is now dedicating his adult life to clearing them away. The Museum is his way to educate visitors about land mines.

    The museum is north of Angkor Wat, on the road to Bateay Srei. Admission is about $2 U.S.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Siem Reap Riverfront

    by AlbuqRay Written May 16, 2009

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    Riverfront at Old Market Bridge
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    The Siem Reap River runs mostly north-south through the city. There are several bridges. The Stone Bridge is by the Royal Residence and gardens. The three bridges south of it are the Wat Bo Bridge, Street 25 Bridge and the Old Market Bridge. A riverfront park and esplanade runs from the Royal Independence gardens to the 90 degree turn south of the Old Market Bridge where the river meets Sivatha Boulevard. The riverfront is pretty nice in this area; however, north of the gardens and south of the 90 degree turn are pretty trashy.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Krousar Thmey Tonle Sap Lake Exhibit

    by AlbuqRay Written May 18, 2009

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    Krousar Thmey Tonle Sap Lake Exhibit
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    Krousar Thmey ("New Family" in Khmer) was created in 1991. It is an apolitical, non-religious organization and helps more than 1100 children in three ways: education and schooling support, child welfare, and cultural and artistic development. All projects are run by Cambodians for Cambodians. They have an exhibit on Tonle Sap Lake at their compound on the main road from Siem Reap to Angkor Wat. It was originally a traveling exhibit that went to schools in 16 towns during 2001-2002. The free exhibit is modest but informative. It supports an excellent cause, so help if you can. There is also a massage service provided by blind members.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

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    Peng Thai's Land

    by AlbuqRay Updated May 20, 2009

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    Peng Thai's Land in Southern Siem Reap
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    So Peng Thai was my licensed Angkor guide (see my General tip). He was also just a nice guy to know. He is finishing up college and is married. They want to have kids and he is already making long range plans like buying land and saving money to build a house. On my last day we were going to Phnom Krom (on the road to Tonle Sap Lake). His land is on the way south of Siem Reap, so we stopped by.

    It is a nice rural location that is developing fast. It is near a school and a temple. There is even an expat neighbor. BTW, many times when we were driving around Siem Reap, Peng Thai pointed out houses that were owned by foreigners. I can see why; it would be a nice place to live and very inexpensive by western standards. I hope it does not become like Santa Fe, New Mexico, where so many rich and famous people from California and the east coast of the USA have bought homes that the house prices in town have become too expensive for the local people that originally gave Santa Fe its uniqueness.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    lollies

    by balhannah Updated Feb 23, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    At the villages on the way to Banteay Srei, you see big pots cooking. In these, they are cooking Palm Sugar which they make into lollies and sell. It is very sweet. Ask your driver to stop at one of the roadside stalls.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Cambodian Villages

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 6, 2013
    Cambodian village.
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    We also took a day trip from Siem Reap to Tonle Sap Lake. On the way we asked our driver to stop in a couple of villages set on the river. We had a walk around looking at the wooden village houses. At one point the very polluted river water looked beautiful covered with a blanket of water lilies.

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    • Photography

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Tonle Sap Lake

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jul 6, 2013
    House on the lake.
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    We hired a car and driver and drove out to the lake through some interesting countryside and little wooden villages. We took a boat trip on the lake.

    The Lake is the largest fresh water lake in South East Asia. Its size changes in the monsoon and dry season. During the monsoon from June to October, the lake is filled by water flowing from the Mekong River and expands to around 10,000 square Kilometers. In places it can be 14m deep. In the dry season from November to May its size is around 3,000 square kilometers and it is around 2m deep. This lake is home to over 300 species of fresh water fish, snakes, crocodiles, tortoises, turtles and otters. More than 100 varieties of water birds including storks, pelicans live here.

    Around the edges of the lake there are many houses on stilts making up Tonle Sap's floating villages. More than 50 per cent of the fish consumed in Cambodia comes from this lake.

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    • Photography

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Siem Reap Off The Beaten Path

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