Siem Reap Things to Do

  • Wat Bo
    Wat Bo
    by AlbuqRay
  • Things to Do
    by akkipaa
  • Things to Do
    by akkipaa

Most Recent Things to Do in Siem Reap

  • AngMimi's Profile Photo

    Park Admission - One two tree - smile!!

    by AngMimi Updated Jun 22, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Have a big smile for rememberance!!
    4 more images

    Before you visit the Angkor Wat and other sides, you need to possess an admission pass. You can purchased the passes at the main entrance on the road to Angkor Wat.

    Passess are sold in one day (US$20),
    3 days (US$40) valid for 1 week.
    7 days (US$60) valid for 1 month.

    Your face will be scanned and printed on the admission pass.

    Always carry your pass/ticket when visiting the temples in Siem Reap. It will be checked upon each park enter and temples. Don't want to get arrested entry without a pass/ticket.

    If you visit Phnom Kulen, Koh Ker or Beng Melea, separate entrance fees of USD20, 10 and 5, respectively..

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    ASPARA DANCING

    by davidjo Written May 21, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While in Cambodia you should take the opportunity to see the Aspara Dancing and you can catch a free show every night at the Temple Bar in Pub Street. Cannot quite remember when the show begins but just enter the bar and go upstairs to where the stage is. Order a meal here, the food is delicious, i had my first Amok there and came back for more the next night. Aspara is a celestial nymph, beautiful, young, elegant and exceptional dancers who entertain the gods. Believe me, the girls wear colourful costumes and make-up while they dance slowly to the music. I took a video of the girls performing and i never get tired of watching it. DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS PERFORMANCE!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    PREAH KHAN

    by ancient_traveler Written Apr 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Preah Khan is a huge, highly explorable monastic complex. Full of carvings, passages and photo opportunities. It originally served as a Buddhist monastery and school, engaging over 1000 monks. For a short period it was also the residence of King Jayavarman VII during the reconstruction of his permanent home in Angkor Thom. Preah Khan means 'sacred sword.’ In harmony with the architecturally similar Ta Prohm, which was dedicated to Jayavarman VII's mother, Preah Khan is dedicated to his father. Features of note: like most of Jayavarman VII's monuments, the Buddha images were vandalized in the later Hindu resurgence. Some Buddha carvings in the central corridor have been crudely carved over with Bodhisattvas, and in a couple of odd cases, a lotus flower and a linga. Also note the cylindrical columns on the building west of the main temple. It is one of the only examples of round columns and may be from a later period.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    TA PHROM

    by ancient_traveler Written Apr 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Intentionally left partially unrestored, massive fig and silk-cotton trees grow from the towers and corridors offering some of the best ‘tree-in-temple’ photo opportunities at Angkor. Flocks of noisy parrots flit from tree to tree adding to the jungle atmosphere. Ta Prohm is well worth an extended exploration of its dark corridors and open plazas. This temple was one of Jayavarman VII's first major temple projects. Ta Prohm was dedicated to his mother. (Preah Khan, built shortly after Ta Prohm in the same general style, was dedicated to Jayavarman VII’s father.) Ta Prohm was originally constructed as a Buddhist monastery and was enormously wealthy in its time, boasting of control over 3000 villages, thousands of support staff and vast stores of jewels and gold. Of the monastic complex style temples, Ta Prohm is a superior example and should be included in almost any temple itinerary.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    BANTEAY KDEI

    by ancient_traveler Written Apr 6, 2012
    3 more images

    It was originally constructed over the site of an earlier temple, and functioned as a Buddhist monastery under Jayavarman VII. As with other works of Jayavarman VII's era, it is a tightly packed architectural muddle, which like Bayon, suffered from several changes in the plans at the time of construction. It was also built using an inferior grade of sandstone and using poor construction techniques, leading to much of the deterioration visible today. A restoration project is underway on many of the towers and corridors, and some areas are blocked off. The foundation stele of the temple has not been found so there is no record of to whom it is dedicated. The 13th century vandalism of Buddha images that is seen on many Jayavarman VII temples is quite apparent on Banteay Kdei.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    BAPHUON

    by ancient_traveler Written Apr 6, 2012

    Huge temple-mountain in the heart of Angkor Thom. Largely collapsed and in ruined condition, the main temple area is undergoing extensive restoration and is not open to the public. The exterior entry gate and elevated walkway are open. Note the unique animal carvings at the walkway entrance, and the large reclining Buddha on the west side, added to the temple at a much later period.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    PHNOM BAKHENG

    by ancient_traveler Written Mar 28, 2012
    1 more image

    The construction of this temple mountain on Phnom Bakheng (Bakheng Hill), the first major temple to be constructed in the Angkor area, marked the move of the capital of the Khmer empire from Roluos to Angkor in the late 9th century AD. It served as King Yasovarman I's state-temple at the center of his new capital city Yasodharapura. The foundation of Bakheng is carved from the existing rock edifice rather than the laterite and earthfill of most other temples. Bakheng's hilltop location makes it the most popular sunset location in the area.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    BAYON

    by ancient_traveler Written Mar 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The giant stone faces of Bayon have become one of the most recognizable images connected to classic Khmer art and architecture. There are 37 standing towers, most but not all sporting four carved faces oriented toward the cardinal points. Who the faces represent is a matter of debate but they may be Loksvara, Mahayana Buddhism's compassionate Bodhisattva, or perhaps a combination of Buddha and Jayavarman VII. Bayon was the Jayavarman VII's state-temple and in many ways represents the pinnacle of his massive building campaign. It appears to be, and is to some degree, an architectural muddle, in part because it was constructed in a somewhat piecemeal fashion for over a century.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    ANGKOR THOM

    by ancient_traveler Updated Mar 28, 2012
    2 more images

    Angkor Thom (Big Angkor) is a 3km2 walled and moated royal city and was the last capital of the Angkorian empire. After Jayavarman VII recaptured the Angkorian capital from the Cham invaders in 1181, he began a massive building campaign across the empire, constructing Angkor Thom as his new capital city. He began with existing structures such as Baphuon and Phimeanakas and built a grand enclosed city around them, adding the outer wall/moat and some of Angkor's greatest temples including his state-temple, Bayon, set at the center of the city. There are five entrances (gates) to the city, one for each cardinal point, and the victory gate leading to the Royal Palace area. Each gate is crowned with 4 giant faces.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    SMILE OF ANGKOR

    by ancient_traveler Updated Mar 28, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    apsara dance
    1 more image

    New unique, big-stage show, unlike any other performance in Cambodia. A laser, dance and 3D spectacular, tracing the history of Angkor and the mystery of the smile of Angkor. Large comfortably air-conditioned theater. Attached restaurant. Come early for dinner and se the show starting at 7:15PM.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    BANTEAY SREY

    by ancient_traveler Updated Mar 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Banteay Srey loosely translates to ‘citadel of the women,’ but this is a modern appellation that probably refers to the delicate beauty of the carvings. Built at a time when the Khmer Empire was gaining significant power and territory, the temple was constructed by a Brahmin counselor under a powerful king, Rajendravarman and later under Jayavarman V. Banteay Srey displays some of the finest examples of classical Khmer art. The walls are densely covered with some of the most beautiful, deep and intricate carvings of any Angkorian temple. The temple's relatively small size, pink sandstone construction and ornate design give it a fairyland ambiance. The colors are best before 10:30 AM and after 2:00 PM, but there are fewer tourists in the afternoon. This temple was discovered by French archaeologists relatively late, in 1914. The temple area closes at 5:00 PM.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    ANGKOR WAT

    by ancient_traveler Updated Mar 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    sunrise
    2 more images

    Angkor Wat is surrounded by a moat and an exterior wall measuring 1300 meters x 1500 meters. The temple itself is 1 km square and consists of three levels surmounted by a central tower. The walls of the temple are covered inside and out with bas-reliefs and carvings. Nearly 2000 distinctively rendered apsara carvings adorn the walls throughout the temple and represent some of the finest examples of apsara carvings in Angkorian era art. But it is the exterior walls of the lower level that display the most extraordinary bas-reliefs, depicting stories and characters from Hindu mythology and the historical wars of Suryavarman II.

    The northern reflecting pool in front is the most popular sunrise location. For sunrise, arrive very early, well before sunrise begins. The sun will rise behind Angkor Wat providing a silhouette of Angkor’s distinctively shaped towers against a colored sunrise sky.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • ancient_traveler's Profile Photo

    BALOON RIDES

    by ancient_traveler Written Mar 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Take a tethered helium balloon ride 200 meters straight up for an amazing aerial view of Angkor Wat, Phnom Bakheng, West Baray and the surrounding countryside. Bring a camera and binoculars if you have them. The big, yellow balloon is based about 1 kilometer west from Angkor Wat on the road from the airport to Angkor Wat.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Luxury Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cochinjew's Profile Photo

    Short trip to Siem REap

    by cochinjew Written Oct 23, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    By the time you arrive at your hotel, it would be 5 30 pm to 6 pm. Have your hotel pick you up at the airport. most of them can arrange also a tuk tuk for your three day stay. you will have to buy a three day ticket to Angkor, even though the evening entrance would be free.
    First night go and watch the sunset
    second do the inner circle of temples
    third day do the outer circle of temples
    you read up on the temples in a good book, dont expect tuk tuk drivers or taxi drivers to know in depth about the temples, if you want to know them in depth. if you want just superficial info, they will give it to you. Perhaps one day you can hire a guide since your experience of the temples would be multipled manyfold if someone explains it to you
    By the way currently Siem Reap is under flood waters not as bad as Bangkok but many of the hotels are closing because of lack of business, and you can see the central part of town including the old market under water on photos or youtube in the Net.

    leave for HCMC at night..
    I am not sure of the time tables and once again you can get that information from the hotel.

    try to get in touch with mandalayinn in siemreap, and the owners possibly can arrange for you an itinerary that you want

    Was this review helpful?

  • rodshaw's Profile Photo

    An evening with Apsara

    by rodshaw Written May 28, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Make time to attend a show to see the Apsara dancers.

    The show we saw included a full buffet meal, and the show saw great. It was so good we booked to come back the next night and good front seat reserved. We felt like royalty!

    Make sure you get to see the Apsara - the story-lines are show there skills well and help to keep the ancient skills alive.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Siem Reap

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

91 travelers online now

Comments

Siem Reap Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Siem Reap things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Siem Reap sightseeing.

View all Siem Reap hotels