Siem Reap Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Siem Reap

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    Srah Srang

    by theguardianangel Written Nov 15, 2012

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    Srah Srang known also as the “King’s bathing Pool” was built in the 10th century. It belongs to a smaller series of water reservoirs, which were built to support “Baray(s)”. From the history we read, Baray were artificial reservoirs supplied by rainfall and diverted rivers. Artificial reservoirs because people raised dykes to contain water, water then would enter through the north dyke and could later be released to irrigate the fields. However, these were not meant to last.

    There are no temples to see here but you will be able to observe agricultural activities /typical lifestyle of Khmer villager as well as the sunrise and sunset. There are also souvenir stores at the entrance and a canteen.

    they're not chasing me, wehe
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    ANGKOR TEMPLES

    by Avieira67 Updated Jan 19, 2015

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    Angkor is the heart and soul of the Kingdom of Cambodia, a source of inspiration and national pride to all Khmers as they struggle to rebuild their lives after the years of terror and trauma.
    The three most important temples at Angkor are: the immense ANGKOR WAT, BAYON, in the fortified ancient city of ANGKOR THOM, and TA PROHM.
    In Angkor Thom, besides Bayon, I have visited Terrace of the Elephants, Terrace of the Leper King, Baphuon, Phimeanakas and Preah Palilay.

    South gate of Angkor Thom Bayon Angkor Wat Ta Prohm

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    Angkor Wat

    by babytourist Written Dec 3, 2014

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    You can't miss Angkor Wat, a day pass US$20 for entrance and they have your pictures on the entrance pass printed so you need to show the guard the pass everytime you enter.

    I challenge myself to walk up the steep steps (I have height phobia) and I have problem in getting down LOL. Fortunately I managed to get down eventually and I have no regrets the Angkor Wat is really amazing

    I suggest you do this place in 3 days so you can slowly walk around and enjoy every single corner of it. I do not have much time so I struggle to cover 4 places in 1 day and ended up dead tired when I get back to hotel.

    A cap or umbrealla is advisable as the sun is unfriendly though this time of the year (end of Nov) is considered cooling. I can feel the cold breeze in the early morning but till noon I can feel my skin scorched

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    Miniature models of the temples

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 6, 2013

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    While wandering around Siem Reap we stumbled upon the home of Siem Reap's master sculptor Dy Preung. He has made a miniature replica of Angkor Wat and other temples and displays them in his garden. He was friendly and happy to pose for photos. His works were very impressive.

    My husband with the sculptor. Miniature Angkor Wat Miniature temple.
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    An evening with Apsara

    by rodshaw Written May 28, 2011

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    Make time to attend a show to see the Apsara dancers.

    The show we saw included a full buffet meal, and the show saw great. It was so good we booked to come back the next night and good front seat reserved. We felt like royalty!

    Make sure you get to see the Apsara - the story-lines are show there skills well and help to keep the ancient skills alive.

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    WANDER AROUND ANGKOR NIGHT MARKET

    by davidjo Written Aug 25, 2014

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    There are a few markets in Phnom Penh so try and visit one as they are great places for photography. This one was near Pub Street , towards the river, but i am not sure if it is still there as i know one burned down recently. Plenty of Chinese sausages.

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    BALOON RIDES

    by ancient_traveler Written Mar 28, 2012

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    Take a tethered helium balloon ride 200 meters straight up for an amazing aerial view of Angkor Wat, Phnom Bakheng, West Baray and the surrounding countryside. Bring a camera and binoculars if you have them. The big, yellow balloon is based about 1 kilometer west from Angkor Wat on the road from the airport to Angkor Wat.

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    BAYON

    by ancient_traveler Written Mar 28, 2012

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    The giant stone faces of Bayon have become one of the most recognizable images connected to classic Khmer art and architecture. There are 37 standing towers, most but not all sporting four carved faces oriented toward the cardinal points. Who the faces represent is a matter of debate but they may be Loksvara, Mahayana Buddhism's compassionate Bodhisattva, or perhaps a combination of Buddha and Jayavarman VII. Bayon was the Jayavarman VII's state-temple and in many ways represents the pinnacle of his massive building campaign. It appears to be, and is to some degree, an architectural muddle, in part because it was constructed in a somewhat piecemeal fashion for over a century.

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    TA PHROM

    by ancient_traveler Written Apr 6, 2012

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    Intentionally left partially unrestored, massive fig and silk-cotton trees grow from the towers and corridors offering some of the best ‘tree-in-temple’ photo opportunities at Angkor. Flocks of noisy parrots flit from tree to tree adding to the jungle atmosphere. Ta Prohm is well worth an extended exploration of its dark corridors and open plazas. This temple was one of Jayavarman VII's first major temple projects. Ta Prohm was dedicated to his mother. (Preah Khan, built shortly after Ta Prohm in the same general style, was dedicated to Jayavarman VII’s father.) Ta Prohm was originally constructed as a Buddhist monastery and was enormously wealthy in its time, boasting of control over 3000 villages, thousands of support staff and vast stores of jewels and gold. Of the monastic complex style temples, Ta Prohm is a superior example and should be included in almost any temple itinerary.

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    PREAH KHAN

    by ancient_traveler Written Apr 6, 2012

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    Preah Khan is a huge, highly explorable monastic complex. Full of carvings, passages and photo opportunities. It originally served as a Buddhist monastery and school, engaging over 1000 monks. For a short period it was also the residence of King Jayavarman VII during the reconstruction of his permanent home in Angkor Thom. Preah Khan means 'sacred sword.’ In harmony with the architecturally similar Ta Prohm, which was dedicated to Jayavarman VII's mother, Preah Khan is dedicated to his father. Features of note: like most of Jayavarman VII's monuments, the Buddha images were vandalized in the later Hindu resurgence. Some Buddha carvings in the central corridor have been crudely carved over with Bodhisattvas, and in a couple of odd cases, a lotus flower and a linga. Also note the cylindrical columns on the building west of the main temple. It is one of the only examples of round columns and may be from a later period.

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    ANGKOR WAT

    by ancient_traveler Updated Mar 28, 2012

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    Angkor Wat is surrounded by a moat and an exterior wall measuring 1300 meters x 1500 meters. The temple itself is 1 km square and consists of three levels surmounted by a central tower. The walls of the temple are covered inside and out with bas-reliefs and carvings. Nearly 2000 distinctively rendered apsara carvings adorn the walls throughout the temple and represent some of the finest examples of apsara carvings in Angkorian era art. But it is the exterior walls of the lower level that display the most extraordinary bas-reliefs, depicting stories and characters from Hindu mythology and the historical wars of Suryavarman II.

    The northern reflecting pool in front is the most popular sunrise location. For sunrise, arrive very early, well before sunrise begins. The sun will rise behind Angkor Wat providing a silhouette of Angkor’s distinctively shaped towers against a colored sunrise sky.

    sunrise sunset
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    BANTEAY SREY

    by ancient_traveler Updated Mar 28, 2012

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    Banteay Srey loosely translates to ‘citadel of the women,’ but this is a modern appellation that probably refers to the delicate beauty of the carvings. Built at a time when the Khmer Empire was gaining significant power and territory, the temple was constructed by a Brahmin counselor under a powerful king, Rajendravarman and later under Jayavarman V. Banteay Srey displays some of the finest examples of classical Khmer art. The walls are densely covered with some of the most beautiful, deep and intricate carvings of any Angkorian temple. The temple's relatively small size, pink sandstone construction and ornate design give it a fairyland ambiance. The colors are best before 10:30 AM and after 2:00 PM, but there are fewer tourists in the afternoon. This temple was discovered by French archaeologists relatively late, in 1914. The temple area closes at 5:00 PM.

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    Royal Palace - Angkor Archaelogical Park

    by Cathy&Gary Updated Apr 2, 2013

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    The Royal Palace is in the centre of the city of Angkor Thom and is distinguished by 2 terraces that are parallel to the road.

    Only the stone substructure is left so it is difficult to imagine the scale and layout of the original complex. The residences of the King and people who worked in the palace were made of wood and so have totally disintegrated.

    Allow approx. 15 minutes to see the Royal Palace.

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    Thommanon Temple

    by theguardianangel Written Nov 13, 2012

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    Thommanon Temple is found adjacent to Chau Say Tevoda temple. The temples are like twins that were constructed between 11th to 12th century. This temple as well as the Chau Say Tevoda temple wasn’t as popular like the other temples such as Angkor Wat and Banteay Samre but through them, the styles and the forms of these more famous landmarks became more evident.

    There’s nothing much special in this place but it’s good to know where the other famous temples gained their style and structure.

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    Kbal Spean

    by Cathy&Gary Written Mar 5, 2014

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    My sister and I went with Marom Hem by Tuk Tuk to Kbal Spean which is 63 kilometers from Siem Reap. This is where the fun started, we had to walk up a mountain for 1.5 kilometers and it was so hot.

    The walk is classed as moderate but in the heat it felt quite difficult in places, it would be dangerous if it had been raining. There are a few wooden stairs in the very steep sections but the rest of the walk uphill is over boulders and in between tree roots etc. It takes about 45 minutes to get to the top and took us 30 minutes to come down.

    Once you are at the top it is very beautiful, this is where you will find the River of 1000 Linga’s, plus carvings in the rocks of Buddha and other various images. The majority of them are under water, so this is a very different place to visit.

    There are also a couple of small waterfalls. Entrance here is with the normal Angkor Pass.

    Kbal Spean Kbal Spean Kbal Spean Kbal Spean Kbal Spean
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