Royal Palace, Phnom Penh

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Samdech Sothearos Blvd.

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  • Royal Palace
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  • Royal Palace
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  • Royal Palace
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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Throne Hall

    by Willettsworld Written May 2, 2010

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    The Throne Hall is the first building you'll come to after entering into the Royal Palace complex. The Khmer name for the Throne Hall is Preah Thineang Dheva Vinnichayyeaah (meaning the "Sacred Seat of Judgement"). It is where the king's confidants, generals and royal officials once carried out their duties. It is still in use today as a place for religious and royal ceremonies (such as coronations and royal weddings) as well as a meeting place for guests of the King. The cross-shaped building is crowned with three spires. The central, 59 meter spire is topped with the white, four-faced head of Brahma. Inside the Throne Hall contains a royal throne and busts of Cambodians kings of the past. This Throne Hall is the second to be built on this site. The first was constructed of wood in 1869-1870 under King Norodom. That Throne Hall was demolished in 1915 and the present building was constructed in 1917 and inaugurated by King Sisowath in 1919. Unfortunately, taking photos of the splendid interior is not allowed.

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    Occupied since 1866

    by Willettsworld Written May 2, 2010

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    The Royal Palace is the top tourist destination in the city and is a complex of royal residences, pavilions, halls, a temple and stupas. The Kings of Cambodia have occupied it since it was built in 1866, with a period of absence when the country came into turmoil during and after the reign of the Khmer Rouge, after King Norodom relocated the royal capital from OuVND to Phnom Penh.

    The complex covers an area of 174,870 square metres (402m x 435m) and is divided by walls into three main compounds: on the north side is the Silver Pagoda and to the south-west is the Khemarin Palace and a central compound containing the Throne Hall. The Silver Pagoda compound is comprised of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha (also known as The Silver Pagoda), stupas (chedi), towering spires (prang prasat) and mural paintings. The central compound is where you'll find the Throne Hall and royal pavilions. These two compounds are open to the public while the third compound, comprising of royal residences, is, unsurprisingly, off limits.

    Open: 7.30am-11am & 2-5pm. Admission: $6.25

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    The royal palace.

    by cachaseiro Written Feb 17, 2010

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    Royal palace, Pnom Penh.
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    The royal palace is the residence of the cambodian king and also an important historical site.
    There are lot´s of things to see there and the complex is very pretty and well worth a visit.
    The place was built in the 19th century and is a mix of french and khmer building style.
    Be aware that there is a fairly strict dress code for women in particular and knees and shoulders should not be shown at the palace compound or you will be refused entry.

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  • CEP1863's Profile Photo

    A "must" on the tourist itinerary.

    by CEP1863 Written Dec 23, 2009

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    The Throne Hall
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    The Royal Palace was constructed over a century ago to serve as the residence of the King of Cambodia, as a venue for the performance of court ceremony and ritual and as a symbol of the Kingdom. Amazingly the buildings all survived the traumas that befell Phnom Penh intact. There are a large number of buildings within the complex, several of which are open to visitors.

    The complex is open between 7.30am and 11.00am, and again between 2.30 pm and 5pm. It is advisable to visit early in the day to avoid the heat, as shade in the grounds is limited in places. Visitors must be modestly dressed (no bare legs or shoulders) Admission is $3USD; it costs an extra $2USD to take a camera in. No photography is allowed in any of the buildings. If you wish to hire a tour guide, there are plenty near the main admission booth.

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  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by AlbuqRay Updated Apr 9, 2009

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    Royal Palace Complex
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    The Royal Palace Complex is just south of the National Museum of Cambodia, so it too was on my walking tour. The complex is divided by walls into three main compounds. The northwest compound is the Royal Residence and is closed to the public. The large central compound on the northeast side contains the Throne Hall and the Chan Chaya Pavilion (entrance). The Silver Pagoda compound is on the southeast side. One of the videoclips is a 360 panorama taken from the park between the Royal Palace and the Tonle Sap River.

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  • Carino's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by Carino Written Nov 9, 2008

    I guess there is no need to write much about the Royal Palace and the Silver Pagoda.
    If you hear the first time about the Royal Palace, buy a travel guide book.

    Some information have changed, hence here some updates:
    Admission Fee seems to have been affected by some sort of mega inflation... it is now a whopping 25'000 Riel.

    Opening Hours are now 8am to 11am and 2pm to 5pm.

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  • chizz's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace, Phnom Penh

    by chizz Updated Jul 24, 2008

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    The Throne Hall, Royal Palace, Phnom Penh
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    Phnom Penh took over from Angkor as the capital city of Cambodia in the 1440's and is a pleasant and interesting city full of French colonial buildings. The Royal Palace is one the must see things to do here and is very impressive with its striking architecture and gold detail. It is the principal residence of the King, Queen and Royal family and has been constructed twice; first in 1434 and secondly in 1866. The compound is 435 metres long by 421 metres wide and is surrounded by a high wall. The compound was built in 1866-70 during the reign of King Norodom. Most of the buildings have magnificent sculptures, have many tiered roofs and are topped with towers which are symbols of prosperity. The previous buildings were wooden and were later made from concrete.
    You can see the Throne Hall, Ho Samran Phirum (which is the King's museum housing musical instruments and utensils for the coronation procession), Ho Preah Khan (houses the Royal regalia), The Pavilion of Napoleon III, The Dancing Hall and the gardens with stupas amongst lots of other buildings. The highlight is the Silver Pagoda where you can see a jewelled gold buddha statue and over 5,000 silver tiles on the floor! (No photos allowed here).
    Dress modestly with no short skirts or shorts above the knee. Shoulders should be covered and hats removed. Large bags are not allowed either.

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  • kenningst's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace and The Silver Pagoda

    by kenningst Written May 28, 2008
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    The Royal Palace and The Silver Pagoda are situated at the same compound and so you are bound to visit both at one go. Though most people would compare it with the Grand Palace in Bangkok, I find the architecture and culture to be different. You can literally call this place the younger twin brother of the one in Bangkok. Although pictures are not allowed in the palace itself, please remember to notice and enjoy the artwork at the ceiling and also the wall. I find it very fascinating.

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  • pehsan's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda

    by pehsan Written Mar 16, 2008

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    Throne hall
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    Royal Palace is very much located near the river front. the stuckture look like building from Bangkok.
    it's looks out on to Samdech Sothearos Blvd betwwen Ph 184 and Ph 240.

    **reminder: no singlet, no shorts or short skirt are allow to enter the palace.

    the big compaund consist of Chan Chaya Pavilion (performace of classical Combodian dance), Throne Hall (topped by 59cm high tower inspired by Bayon from Angkor) and Silver Pagoda (floor is covered with over 5000 silver tiles weighing 1kg each). Silver Pagoda also known as Wat Preah Keo (Pagoda of Emerald Buddha) was preserved by Khmer Rouge to show to the world that they concern for the conservation of Combodia's cultural riches. some relic buddha were brought from Sri Lanka and Myanmar. if you were interested with the structures and richness of Khmer civilisation, where they came from, i think this place is aptly for you. what impressed me was this artificial hill with a structure containing a bronze footprint of the buddha from Sri Lanka.

    Admission: USD3
    Opening hours: 7.30am - 11am & 2.30pm - 5pm

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    The Royal Residence

    by Etoile2B Written Sep 13, 2007

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    Throne Hall
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    The Royal Residence (Preah Barom Reachea Vaeng Chaktomuk) is one of the favorite attractions with visitors to Phnom Penh. The palace was built in 1866 and is home to many valuable objects. The King of Cambodia still uses this as his official residence to date. Several buildings cover the grounds and are open and available for exploration during visiting hours. The grounds are beautiful and it is worth a visit. The grounds are small enough to cover in an hour or two, but more time could be spent in the serene surroundings.

    Be aware there is a dress code while visiting the Royal Residence and Silver Pagoda: No hats, no short skirts or shorts and no tank tops. A good rule of thumb is shoulders and knees should be covered. They will provide shirts as a cover up to wear while touring the structures.

    Admission is $3US and there is an additional $2US charge if you wish to use your camera during your visit. Hours: 7:30 – 11:00 am and 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

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  • aalayaa's Profile Photo

    royal palace

    by aalayaa Written Aug 29, 2007
    gate of royal palace

    i didn't go inside the royal palace, the ticket just rocketed into US$6 for entrance fee.
    many people refused to go after realising the expensive ticket.
    well they put some seats outside for people who just want to be outside while waiting for their friend inside.

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  • Emile72's Profile Photo

    Gold, gold, gold

    by Emile72 Written Jul 30, 2007

    We visited this as part of our day tour by rented taxi in Phnom Penh. Right in the city centre, so you obviously do not need a cab. Royal palace is nice and so is the silver pagoda. However, if you have been to the royal premises in Bangkok, this looks quite small.

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  • traceyspacey's Profile Photo

    All that gold

    by traceyspacey Updated Jun 5, 2007
    Just one of the many buildings at the Royal Palace
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    Amazing collection of buildings, ornate gilding. With the exception of the Japanese tour group it was really peaceful. There is an exhibition on Khmer style houses and peoples lifestyles and also a collection of Royal jewelled cigarette boxes amongst other things. It is worth taking your camera in (2 dollars). Because this is the official residence of King Sihamoni alot of the buildings are not open to the public. Costs 3 Dollars to get in. We didn't get to see the Silver Pagoda and couldn't find postcards of it either. Dress code is no sleeveless tops and no short skirts or shorts.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Ramayana mural

    by leffe3 Updated Feb 10, 2007
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    Within the Silver Pagoda compound of the Royal Palace, the highlight is the superb Ramayana mural - a colossal 80 metres depicitng scenes from the Sanskrit poem. The mural dates from approximately 1900.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by leffe3 Updated Feb 10, 2007
    Throne Hall
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    The Royal Palace complex was begun by King Norodom in 1886 when the capital was moved to Phnom Penh. Most buildings were completed before World War I, with support from the French administrators and Thai designers and architects. French influence can be seen in the formal gardens which surround the palace and there are a few European-style buildings on the grounds. A few of the buildings were dismantled and rebuilt in the 1960s.

    Open 8 - 11am and 2- 5pm daily.

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