Royal Palace, Phnom Penh

4 out of 5 stars 98 Reviews

Samdech Sothearos Blvd.

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Royal Palace
    by CDM7
  • Royal Palace
    by CDM7
  • Royal Palace
    by CDM7
  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by leffe3 Updated Feb 10, 2007
    Throne Hall
    4 more images

    The Royal Palace complex was begun by King Norodom in 1886 when the capital was moved to Phnom Penh. Most buildings were completed before World War I, with support from the French administrators and Thai designers and architects. French influence can be seen in the formal gardens which surround the palace and there are a few European-style buildings on the grounds. A few of the buildings were dismantled and rebuilt in the 1960s.

    Open 8 - 11am and 2- 5pm daily.

    Was this review helpful?

  • runwitme's Profile Photo

    Must See in Phnom Penh

    by runwitme Updated Dec 28, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chanchhaya Pavillion
    3 more images

    The palace construction were set up to the Khmer Traditional architecture, which I found quite similar to Thai. But then, what do I know.

    The palace compound is beautifully landscaped, providing many "Kodak moment" opportunities. A must visit at least once when you are in Phnom Penh.

    The Royal Palace opens daily from 7:30 to 11:00 and 14:00 to 17:00. All or part of the palace may be closed for special events. The entry fee is USD3. You must pay an additional USD2 to use a still camera or USD5 for a video camera.

    No photography is allowed inside any of the buildings. Since the palace and all the structures within face east, the best time to visit is in the early morning hours.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mel&Mike's Profile Photo

    Gold is In!

    by Mel&Mike Written Oct 29, 2006
    Inside the Palace Grounds
    1 more image

    Opulence is word that comes to mind when you wander through the palace. Gold is the metal of choice and it isn't short on jewels as well as other semiprecious stones! As expected you need to remove your shoes to enter and photographs are forbidden in some spots (you can be sneaky - just respect the place and don't use a flash and don't be obvious). The have a crazy system about camera prices and are horrible if you loose your ticket!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • shintarojon's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by shintarojon Updated Jul 1, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace
    4 more images

    (last date visited: Dec. 27, 2004)

    Entrance fee - 3 US $

    Photo fee - 2 US $

    I think it is better not to pay the photo fee coz since there are so many visitors in this huge place, they wont notice it.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mary2u99's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by mary2u99 Updated Jun 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace
    4 more images

    This was once a small town called Banteay Kev was built in 1813. Since King Sihanouk's return to Cambodia, visitors are only allowed to visit the palace's Silver pagoda and its surrounding compound.

    The silver pagoda is often called the Pagoda of the Emerald Buddha or Wat Preah Kaeo after the statue housed there. King Norodom originally built the wooden temple in 1892 and inside; its floor comprised of more than 5000 silver blocks. Very cooling to walk on it.

    Opening Hours: 7.30am - 11.00pm, 2.00pm - 5.00 pm. Entry Fees: US$3.00p/p, camera $2.00, video camera $5.00.
    (Do not pay for the camera as you will not be able to take photo inside the palace only on the ground).

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Visit the King's home

    by King_Golo Updated Apr 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chan Chaya Pavillion

    Being a king myself ;-) (king_golo, to be specific), I had to visit the Royal Palace in Cambodia's capital. It's well worth a visit - magnificent buildings full of royal character! If this is your first sight to visit in Cambodia, I think you're gonna like it as the architecture is really interesting. Having seen more of Cambodia's architecture, you might find it less extraordinary. The actual houses in which the King resides cannot be visited, but you can see them from a distance. One building I particularly liked was the former dancing hall (Chan Chaya Pavillion). The Throne Hall is also very interesting.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Ell Palacio-The Palace

    by elpariente Written Feb 11, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    P.P.Pagoda de Plata - Silver Pagoda
    4 more images

    El Palacio Real impresiona cuando te vas acercando desde la orilla del rio .
    Es una construccion que recuerda el Gran Palacio de Bangkok y en ella destacan la Pagoda de Plata que tiene el suelo cubierto con baldosas de plata y un Buda de marmol , el Salon del Trono y los frescos que estan en los corredores alrededor del Palacio

    Advertencias :
    En cuanto tengas posibilidad de ver el palacio entra pues pueden cerrarlo sin avisar cuando el Rey tiene alguna ceremonia

    Para las mujeres: Si no quieres comprarte una camiseta en la puerta ven al palacio con mangas

    The Palace is really amazing as you reach it from the River front .
    It is a construction that remembers the Bangkok Grand Palace and on it we should like to underline the Silver Pagoda , with silver tiles on the floor and a marble Buddha , The Throne Hall and the frescoes that are in the corridors that surround the Temple

    Warnings :

    As soon as you can, go to see the Palace because they may close it without notice when the King has any ceremony

    For the women : If you do not want to buy a T-shirt in the gate wear something with sleeves

    Was this review helpful?

  • NedHopkins's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by NedHopkins Written Feb 10, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Throne Hall
    4 more images

    The Royal Palace complex is less crowded -- with buildings and with people -- than Bangkok's City Palace, but its structures are no less elaborate or beautiful. The Throne Hall, is the most impressive of them. It is a relatively new building, erected only in 1919.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • euzkadi's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace.

    by euzkadi Written Oct 20, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace
    1 more image

    Built in1866 over the old citadel of Banteay Krev, this palace is a fine example of Kmer art. The construction was supervised by french architects. The beautiful Throne Hall was built in 1917, for royal coronations. The walls are covered by kmer paintings of the Ramayana story.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tina-Perth's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by Tina-Perth Updated Jul 29, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Well, I would say that since you're in Phnom Penh, you must visit the Royal Palace, but I certainly wouldn't go to Phnom Penh for that reason.

    The Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda were not the most interesting things we have done. It is lovely to see the Khmer architecture, but inside the buildings it's not particularly well maintained. The grounds are pretty enough. There is a miniature replica of Angkor Wat near the exit. They have made some attempt to create interest at the exit area with an example of a khmer house, a girl weaving silk, some music and a small museum.

    The Royal Palace was built in 1866 and is still the residence of the Royal Family. Of course that area is out of bounds.

    You are not permitted to take pictures of anything other than the outsides of the buildings and the gardens, even though they charge you to take your camera in.

    Opening Hours: 7.30am - 11.00pm, 2.00pm - 5.00 pm.
    Entry Fees: US$3.00p/p, camera $2.00, video camera $5.00. Photography is not permitted inside any of the buildings.

    See next tip for rules of entry to the Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tina-Perth's Profile Photo

    Rules for entering Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda

    by Tina-Perth Updated Jul 29, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Do not wear shoes inside the Throne Hall and temples
    2. No smoking
    3. Do not wear hats inside the Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda.
    4. Be appropriately dressed which means no bare shoulders, stomachs or legs. Guards will prevent you from entering if you are not correctly dressed.
    5. Do not take photographs in the prohibited places.
    6. Do not touch the glass panes, walls, columns or murals.
    7. Keep quiet.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by iwys Updated Apr 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The palace is beautiful, but not that old. It was built from 1911 onwards on the site of a late nineteenth century citadel. The Silver Pagoda was built as recently as 1962.

    In the 1970s the palace was looted and badly damaged, but since the return of King Norodom Sihanouk to the palace in 1991, it ha been restored to pristine condtion. The Silver Pagoda is covered with thousands of silver tiles and inside the main temple is a solid gold, standing statue of Buddha, weighing 75kilograms.

    Admission to the Royal Palace is $3 plus $2 for a camera. Then you find it is forbidden to take photographs inside any of the buildings!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by richiecdisc Updated Mar 29, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the majestic Throne Hall

    Phnom Penh’s Royal Palace complex is reminiscent of Bangkok’s Grand Palace though on a smaller scale. This can work to the visitor’s advantage however when one realizes that with an early start, you can have the whole place to yourself, a near impossibility in the Thai capital. Since King Sihanouk’s return to power, the actual Royal Palace is off limits but there are still ample things to explore. The Throne Hall which is crowned with a 59 meter tower that brings Angkor’s Bayon to mind, is the first thing one sets eyes on when entering the imposing compound. Though it dates back to 1919, many of the artifacts once kept here met a fate similar to the general Cambodian populace at the hands of the Khmer Rouge.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace - Napoleon III Pavilion

    by Blatherwick Written Mar 27, 2005
    Royal Palace - Napoleon III Pavilion

    A curious western style building can be found on the Royal Palace grounds. The is the Napoleon III Pavilion. It was given by the Emperor Napoleon III to Empress Eugenie (his wife), who in turn had it dismantled and sent to Phnom Penh as a gift for King Norodom in the 1870s.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by Blatherwick Written Mar 27, 2005
    Royal Palace - Throne Hall

    The most interesting buildings in Phnom Penh are those in the Royal Palace. The Throne Hall was inspired by the Bayon at Ankor and was constructed by King Sisowath in 1919. It replaced a vast wooden building that was built in 1869. This building is used for coronations and ceremonies by the King.

    Also located on the grounds of the palace is the Silver Pagoda (Temple of the Emerald Buddha - Wat Phra Kaew), formerly a wooden building, was rebuilt in 1962 in concrete and marble. The pagoda is floored with over 5000 silver tiles each weighing 1 kg. It is famous for its 90 kg solid gold Buddha made in 1907 and an emerald Buddha said to be made of baccarant crystal. Sharing the pagoda are many other interesting artifacts and jewels.

    Other buildings include, the Chan Chaya Pavilion, the Royal Treasury, the Royal Banqueting Hall, a pavilion housing a huge footprint of the Buddha, and the Napoleon III Pavilion.

    The Royal Palace is open from 8 a.m to 11 a.m and from 2 p.m to 5 p.m everyday except on the national holidays. The Royal Palace is closed when the royal family is home. Admission to the site is $3 and it's worth getting a guide.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Phnom Penh

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

94 travelers online now

Comments

View all Phnom Penh hotels