Huangshan Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Huangshan

  • SandiM's Profile Photo

    There are no 'short-cuts' on Huangshan Mtn!

    by SandiM Written Oct 25, 2009
    Look closely to see the Western Steps!

    If you are pressed for time and want the easiest route to climb Huangshan Mountain, read this. My 72 yr old mother and I climbed Huangshan in 48hrs in September 2009. The easiest up route is to take the Yungu cablecar up, and ascend the Eastern steps. This is route doesn't have many ascents, and is a fairly easy for even 2 older women to do. The view is lovely! It takes approx 1 hr to do the actual steps from the cable car, with plenty of stops to rest and take photos (longer if you are slightly out of shape!). No smoking is allowed along this route except at the cable car (mom is a smoker!). We stayed at the Beihai hotel at the top. Mornings at the top of Huangshan will find you at the sunrise-viewing platform with about 30 other people. It's a tight squeeze, with uneven footing since it's not a flat platform up there! On the way down, we decided to take the 'short-cut' route, and not take the western sea canyon route. Well, if you take the 'short-cut', sure it's less distance to walk but it is entirely UPHILL WALKING. There is no view along this route! Just stairs & stairs & stairs going up up up. In hindsight, we should have taken the slightly longer western sea canyon route, to at least appreciate the view. Once we hit the actual 'western steps' down, the view was more incredible than the eastern side! However, we would have been in agony attempting the upward journey as it is VERY steep and clings to the side of the moutain. But, so worth it going down! Time down is approx 3-5 hours, depending on how fast you go. We were pressed for time to hit the Yuping cable car before it shut down for the night (530pm) so we hired the porters to haul us down. We heard it was pricey, and it was. We managed to negotiate a price of 700RMB EACH (1400 total) to go from the Tian Pavillion down to the cablecar. It was pricey, but they had to haul both of us down and we each weighed around 155 pounds, and we wanted them to rush. It didn't look like you could negotiate a better rate, their supervisors seem to be watching the porters closely and when we got them to come down from 780RMB to 700RMB, they all turned to the supervisor and waited for his nod before taking us. AND THEY MOVED FAST! We got down in about 1.5 hrs with these guys with a couple of stops for rests. They also hinted about giving them a tip (we did, they really deserved it! 38 celsius!). For 4 guys, we gave them an extra 250RMB total. Since we had to catch the train at 7pm in Tunxi, we paid it. And what a memory we have now!!

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • susanpingu's Profile Photo

    Nine Dragon Waterfall

    by susanpingu Updated Jan 16, 2008

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    Mid-level of Nine Dragon Waterfall
    1 more image

    There are nine sections to this waterfall, hence the name. If you only go as far as the rock where everyone have their picture taken, you will have missed the upper sections. To continue further up, take an unmarked trail to the left and continue to hike some 15 mins and you will see the top of the waterfall. The unmarked trail was pointed out to me after I asked a guide if there was more to the waterfall.
    Admission fee: 42 yuan.

    The hostel (zhaodaiso) called a cab for me to get there for 15 yuan. I took the local blue bus back (1 yuan) after telling the cab driver not to wait for me (they were pestering me to sample tea in a back room which I felt really uncomfortable doing). After visiting the waterfall, I walked down to where a group of old folks were sitting in front of their farm houses .......turned out I had just missed the local bus and so ended up spending 40 mins or so chatting with these friendly farmers.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Taking pictures at Huangshan

    by SLLiew Written Aug 16, 2006

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    Everyone seem to want to have their shots taken to show their friends back home.

    Easier for me, as I was mainly taking pictures of scenery but still have to avoid bumping each other's camera or each other off the slope.

    Because of the crowd waiting in turn to take pictures of all the famous sights with legendary names of characters formed by mountain tops, rocks, clouds and trees.

    With names like:
    "Rock that flew"
    "Monkey overlooking the sea"
    "Lotus Flower Peak"

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Sunrise at Huangshan

    by SLLiew Written Aug 16, 2006

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    Depend on weather, you may get a chance to witness this much talked about experience of seeing the red sun shooting out above the clouds in Huangshan.

    Check with your tour guide and hotel, there is a predictability factor of the chance of seeing sunrise and expected time of sunrise.

    So plan the time of the year of your trip if this is a must.

    You have to do a 10-20 minutes short hike up the steps to site of watching sunrise in the dark and so bring a torch light if your hotel does not supply one. Remember you may be too tired in waking up if you have been hiking the previous day.

    I woke up just in time to catch sunrise around my hotel.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Hiking up, along and down the mountain

    by SLLiew Written Aug 16, 2006

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    Depending on your time and fitness level, you can hike all the way or part of the way, taking cable cars.

    There are two directions, the back or west which is steeper and more dramatic and the front or east. The back or west has cable car for half of the journey and the front or east has cable that goes all the way.

    So if you cannot walk well, take the front cable car up and down and you can still enjoy the walk along the top of the mountain. If you can walk, there are sedan chairs but it can be a bit scarry as these old male carriers have to keep the momentum of moving fast avoiding other tourists.

    Most important is to not to push yourself too hard. Stop frequently to enjoy the view.

    Hiking most of the way or part of the way to Huangshan is an exhilarating experience.

    Only thing is that traffic is both ways and you have watched for other hikers.

    Highly recommended
    Back/West Route:
    Going up: I hiked 15 minutes to the cable car station. Then hiked another 4 hours to the top.

    Front/East Route:
    Going down: I hiked 15 minutes to the other cable car station. Then waited for all those who hiked down.

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  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Welcoming Guests Pine (Ying Ke Song)

    by Confucius Updated Jul 6, 2006

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    Huangshan's most famous pine tree: Ying Ke Song
    1 more image

    Its scientific name is Pinus Hwangahanensis. This legendary pine tree is still alive and welcoming guests to Huangshan. It is so famous in China that a security guard ranger is permanently stationed at its side like a soldier to protect it from the crowds of tourists who jostle for best posing position as well as watching at night through severe weather conditions.
    Special people who get paid to go around estimating the age of trees have guessed that this one is over 800 years old.
    Every Chinese tourist who visits Huangshan wants their photo taken with this tree. In the second photo, you can see calligraphy on a nearby rock praising the wonderful scene.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    The weather

    by Sharrie Updated Jun 28, 2004

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    I wouldn't say this is the best picture one could get out of Huangshan, hardly! But this is MY picture & it's what I could get with that kind of weather.
    It's also one which I had to brave a lot of effort & courage to get. So, it's special to me.

    When I was standing right there & then, I remembered the cold, the wind & the fright!
    Yes, it's scary to stand at the edge on a windy day & to look down & wonder how far one could fall.

    In fact, I heard there were many who committed suicide there because of relationship problems (from a chinese guide whom I met on the train).
    The irony of it all, there's nothing to protect you from falling, not many railings along the trails!
    In fact, I witnessed one such fright... a child nearly fell!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Slip & you die

    by Sharrie Updated Jun 28, 2004

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    A lot of times, ignorance is bliss.
    That's the case for me for Huangshan.
    It's an unforgettable hike but a very dangerous one.
    I was crazy enough to go hiking solo!!!

    What was on my mind then?
    1 step at a time & I'll be there.
    Never look back, just ahead.

    Why do I have to do it?
    Because I've never done it. It's innate, it's a challenge. It's that which later formed my courage for heading to Tibet, Iceland, Scandinavia & South America.
    It's that which grows! That's it, it's growth!
    & I needed that badly at that moment in time :-)))

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • stmlnyc's Profile Photo

    Sunset at Brightness Peak

    by stmlnyc Written Feb 23, 2004
    Sunset view from Brightness Peak

    The second highest peak, Brightness Peak is known as the point to watch the sunset and sunrise.

    I didn't think it was worth the wait though. But then most tourists have the whole day so they mind as well end the day or start the day seeing the sun.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • stmlnyc's Profile Photo

    Lotus Peak

    by stmlnyc Written Feb 23, 2004
    Sign atop Lotus Peak

    The highest peak in Huangshan. I think the climb from the Beihai side (from Brightness Peak) is less steep.

    Either way, take your time and be careful. You'll be surprised (and maybe dismayed) to see a vendor selling locks atop Lotus Peak. How did they manage to get that table up there?

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Old street in the town of Huangshan

    by stmlnyc Written Feb 20, 2004

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    Old street in Huangshan

    Don't forget to visit traditional Old Street in the town of Huangshan. There you'll find quaint shops selling all sorts of souvenirs, snacks, etc. The 2-3 block strip of shops is a popular tourist draw after hiking in the mountains of Huangshan.

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Danger

    by Sharrie Updated Jul 27, 2003

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    When hiking alone, the danger is you could slip & fall & no one is there to seek help. On hindsight, it's a stupid decision. Then, I thought it was very courageous of me to do so. So the morale of the story is, when you made it, it's courage. When you didn't, it's stupidity, lol...

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Moving on...

    by Sharrie Updated Jul 27, 2003

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    On a sunny day, this is supposed to be an awesome sight. Not this time though... I was disappointed naturally. But there's nothing one can do with regards to nature. U just have to bear with it & hope things get better with time. In this case, it didn't. So, I moved on...

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • aukjejetty's Profile Photo

    Climbing Huangshan

    by aukjejetty Updated Jun 20, 2003

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    Workers With Heavy Loads

    Huangshan [translation (not the true meaning) = Yellow mountain] in Anhui province is something I can highly recommend. You have to climb up wat seem like thousands of steps. But the climb is so rewarding! On top op of this mountain you see what poets and painters were inspired by for centuries. Admission is 65yuan. For more information see my travologue on Huangshan.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Emerald Valley

    by brockton Updated May 15, 2003

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    The Emerald Valley is a beautiful scenic area of bamboo groves not far from Tangkou, at the base of Huangshan. There is also an emerald pool located on the north side of Huanghsan mountain (near Taiping) that is more difficult to get to but also worth seeing. The emerald valley is often overlooked but makes for an excellent hike, especially if the weather keeps you from climbing the mountain.

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Huangshan Things to Do

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