Eating and Drinking, Beijing

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  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Peking Roast Duck - a must

    by SLLiew Written Oct 12, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Do not miss having "Peking Roast Duck" while in Beijing.

    Beijing ducks are specially bred and prepared and the north winds of Beijing is said to have a special finishing touch in the drying process.

    Crispy duck skin with thin slices of meat is first served with Chinese shallots wrap with a pancake and dipped with a special sauce.

    While "Peking Roast Duck" is available in Chinese restaurants worldwide, nothing matches having at the place of origin. Happy eating.

    Fondest memory: Here is a list of the some of many Beijing restaurants serving Peking Roast Duck.

    Better to ask your hotel staff or tour guide to recommend you the closest popular one.

    Quan Ju De Restaurant at Qianmen
    1/F to 3/F, Unit A, Tianchuang Shiyuan Dasha, 309, Huizhong Bei Li, Chaoyang District

    Quan Ju De Restaurant at Hepingmen
    9, Shuaifuyuan Hutong, Wangfujing Da Jie, Dongcheng District

    Quan Ju De Restaurant at Wangfujing
    14, Xi Da Jie, Qianmen, Xuanwu District

    Da Dong Roast Duck Restaurant
    Bldg. 3, Tuanjie Lake, Chaoyang District

    Bianyifang Roast Duck Restaurant (Anhua Branch)
    6, Bei Sanhuan Zhong Lu, Chaoyang District

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  • Dashanzi - arts, culture, eating, drinking

    by mke1963 Written Jan 10, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Dashanzi is a well-kept secret. Few taxi drivers even know of the place, yet it is less than a kilometre from the touruist hub of the Lido area.
    Dashanzi is an old factory and power station area, which has become a focus for many new galleries, clubs, bars and restaurants.
    It is centred around a former Bauhaus-style radio factory. An art gallery has been constructed in the shell, and a photo gallery (Beijing's best) in an annexe. In the collection of old brick buildings, huts and grimy industrial buildings a new arts complex is developing, unplanned, unstructured and unashamed.
    So far, there are maybe 20 tenants, all at the cutting edge of the Beijing scene.

    Getting there is very difficult unless you already have a good map.
    From the Lido, complex turn right, then left at the lights bringing you to the Dashanzi roundabout, take the left turn onto Jiuxian Qiaolu (but not the road that takes you under the expressway to Wang Jing for those who know Wang Jing!), heading north. Immediately before the second pedestrian overbridge, turn down the lane to the right past some security guards (The lane is immediately before the tall Hong Yuan appartment complex) and head to the end of the road...maybe 300 metres.
    Taxi drivers will know Jiuxian Qiaolu but it is a long road.

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    Drinkable water

    by Lemonita Written Aug 6, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Family and friends were worried for me about water in China. They told me to only drink Wahaha distilled water.

    Actually, if you stay in major cities, there is absolutely no need to be worried about the brands you might find in small shops or supermarkets. I've drunk different brands and there were no problem at all.

    Nongfu Spring, one of the most popular water

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  • calcaf38's Profile Photo

    You won't starve

    by calcaf38 Written Mar 3, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: You can easily eat nine meals a day while discovering Beijing. Yet what is served will be quite unlike the Cashew Chicken, MooShoo or other General Tsos from home. Very little rice, actually. Lots of noodly soups. And lots of atmosphere, no matter what. Also, it often feels like there are four servers per customer, and if you speak a little Putonghua, they'll just buzz around you and giggle. Be ready for an odd slip which will be placed over your coat (on the back of your chair) to protect it from spills. Also, if there is a wet label on the side of your bowl, don't be alarmed. It's like the "Inspected by No 12" that we find in our pant pockets.

    A row of restaurants, South of the Lama Temple Not like American Chinese food
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Remember when this was the only drink in town?

    by Confucius Updated May 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Ah, the good old days before Starbucks and Red Bull. For less than a dollar you could get a six pack of orange soda on just about every street corner in Beijing.

    Fondest memory: This photo was taken during the summer of 1988 when the sight of a flatbed tricycle loaded with flat orange sodas was just as flat out refreshing as the drink.

    Flat orange sodas?  I'll take three!
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Food and Dining

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  • Guantanamera's Profile Photo

    Hot Pot Dinner.

    by Guantanamera Updated Jul 3, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: We had a fantastic traditional Chinese dinner of hot pot... This dinner features a central container of boiling hot water in which you can dip and cook slices of meat... Delicious!

    One of the golden rules of travel... The locals always no best where to go for great dining experiences!

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Imperial Food Banquet

    by SLLiew Written Oct 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Once only served to the Emperors, now the recipes of Imperial food can be served in restaurants in Beijing. We had ours on a tour at the Summer Palace.

    The imperial yellow covered chairs beckoned us. Every dish was beautifully decorated. Some in the form of phoenix, fish, birds, etc. Quantity of each dish is small, it is the creativity and variety and pleasing of the eyes and the multitude of choices.

    Previously I have heard of two day banquet to complete the menu. We were there for only an hour before continuing our tour.

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  • Guantanamera's Profile Photo

    Beijing duck dinner.

    by Guantanamera Updated Jun 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: On the express train from Hong Kong, I met a wonderful Beijing couple that took me and a Swedish traveling friend out for an absolutely succulent meal of Beijing duck and other Chinese delicacies. They took us out to a fantastic restaurant packed with nothing but locals that we would have never found on our own! And they were very helpful in telling us what everything was and even instructed us on the proper Chinese method of using chopsticks...!

    Pictured here is myself and traveling friend Par from Sweden at the restaurant. Some people think we look almost like twins... In case you're not sure, I am the more handsome guy... on the right...!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • ahorny's Profile Photo

    Language barrier

    by ahorny Updated Apr 30, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The food is great, however, the language barrier is really present. Don't expect people to have the facility of the english language. Your tour guide/interpreter is the most important person on the trip

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  • Applelyn's Profile Photo

    Beef Noodle/ Yang Chun Mien/Pekking Duck

    by Applelyn Written Jan 14, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: You must try the Yang Chun Mien with beef. A very large portion for a gal so you can try to share. But it is a very simple dish with excellent taste. You can get it anywhere--even roadside stalls have them.

    Pekking Duck--You must go to the famous restaurant that just sell it...Let me recall then update again...Or you can ask around. The skin is so crispy and the spring onion is fresh. Coated with special sauce and wheat skin...it is just unforgettable

    Fondest memory: The snow flakes.....My first sighting of snow....short, abt 5 mins...but unforgettable....I miss the Beef Noodle :(

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors
    • Food and Dining

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  • socrates_07's Profile Photo

    I have to say that I often...

    by socrates_07 Written Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I have to say that I often remember of the chinese breakfast. It is so different to the european breakfast and I really miss it.

    What did I eat:

    Baozi (stuffed steamed rolls)

    You tiao

    Dou jiang (bean juice)

    Fondest memory: If you speak a little bit chinese it would help to order what you really want to eat. Unfortunately I don´t speak that language but with the help of native people I never ate anything which I didn´t like to eat.

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  • VTShounen's Profile Photo

    sample the food there. As is...

    by VTShounen Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Favorite thing: sample the food there. As is the case with visiting any part of China really, eating is a must. Food is such an important part of Chinese culture that to really experience the country is to pig out!! Aside from the local Northern cuisine, the city contains a large variety of restaurants representing all parts of the country. But in particular you must try the local dishes, including dumplings and Peking duck. If you are not going to make your way further north or west, then Bejing would be a great place to sample cooking from the ethnic minorities in the north and west.

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  • Jeeem's Profile Photo

    There are plenty of McDonalds...

    by Jeeem Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There are plenty of McDonalds and KFC restaurants to go to if you get tired of the local fare, but I think the most exciting venture was just taking a chance and trying out what I call, 'Point & Eat' restaurants where there is no menu in English. You are taking a chance, but you get to sample some really interesting meals!

    Fondest memory: My fondest memory of Beijing was just taking a leisurely stroll down Chegongzhuang, buying some bottled tea and sitting with the elders to read my China Daily newspaper. The elders are never in a rush, very friendly, with so much character in their faces! They play Chinese chess, cards, practice their Tai Chi exercises and just sit and chat in Mandarin. They were very warm people!

    A heated Chinese Chess game
    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • rebibi's Profile Photo

    rebibi's General Tip

    by rebibi Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: The marvellous porcelain and the chinese culture to drink tea. This is really a ceremony and takes a lot of time. At first sight they realize if the tea is still too hot do drink or not.
    The cup at your left hand side has nothing in it, the other one is filled with hot water. Do you notice the change of colour of the phoenix?

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Chinese Beers

    by machomikemd Written May 26, 2009

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: China has been brewing beer for the past 9,000 years but it was mostly rural stuff and not into the mass produced market but things changed in the 19th century when european powers entered china and established mini colonies and introduced european style beers. Among the beers is Tsingtao Beer, the most popular Beer in China plus a host of other brands such as China Blue Ribbon, Yanjing, Sie-Tang Lio and Zhujiang. A Typical 500 ml beer in china costs 10 RMB and a 355 ml aluminum can will cost 8 RMB in convenience stores while in retaurants and bars triple that price. Chinese beers often contain rice, sorghum and sometimes rye in addition to barley and Alcohol content varies from 3.5% to the strong variety of 7.5%.

    Chinese ofted drink beers during meals and are available everywhere! try one now!

    Fondest memory: try the different kinds of chinese beer, their a ok!

    tsingtao Beer light bodied taste in aluminum cans REEB Suntory
    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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