Eating and Drinking, Beijing

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  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
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    Beijing Dried Fruits

    by machomikemd Written Oct 28, 2014

    If you are fond of Dried Fruits, moreso the dry and crispy kind, then you won't be dissapointed as Beijing has many kinds of Dried Fruits on sale on the various Supermarkets, Souvenir Stalls, Convenience Stores around the City and they come in vacuum packed goodness and is available into various temperate fruits like dried apples, dried apricots, dried oranges, dried pears and a lot more and a small 100 gram vacuum packed dried fruit cost RMB 12 to 15 per pack at the various areas around Beijing.

    Try to buy and try them, they are really good and not that sweet and has that crunch.

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    Beijing Dried Fruits

    by machomikemd Written Oct 28, 2014

    If you are fond of Dried Fruits, moreso the dry and crispy kind, then you won't be dissapointed as Beijing has many kinds of Dried Fruits on sale on the various Supermarkets, Souvenir Stalls, Convenience Stores around the City and they come in vacuum packed goodness and is available into various temperate fruits like dried apples, dried apricots, dried oranges, dried pears and a lot more and a small 100 gram vacuum packed dried fruit cost RMB 12 to 15 per pack at the various areas around Beijing.

    Try to buy and try them, they are really good and not that sweet and has that crunch.

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    Lotus Pod snack

    by blueskyjohn Updated Oct 13, 2013

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    Lotus pods are found being sold by street vendors. I purchased this one at Huo Hai Lake. It was 10RMB for two. You definitely should inspect the pod, looking for seed shells that are empty.

    The way you eat this is to remove the seed from the pod. Then peel the seed. if you like you can split the seed to see the sprout inside. The lotus seed has a bitter taste. the seed is said to have a health benefit that is good for the lungs. It is unique and I grew accustom to the taste. It was nice to eat over a cup of tea.

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    The Y files. Flavors of China: Peking duck

    by marielexoteria Updated Nov 19, 2009

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    The Y files, where Y stands for "yummy!".

    Peking duck is, according to some, the dish that represents the city the most. I'm not really a fan of duck (or fowl) but I went to China with as much of an open mind as I could when it comes to food (due to food allergies) and I wanted to give the duck a try.

    Now, from what I read in a guidebook (whose name I can't remember right now), the duck is slaughtered after about 60 days then seasoned with a layer of syrup before it's hung and roasted in an oven. By pumping air thru the duck, the skin is separated from the fat. This way of preparing the duck gives it its lean, crispy flavor.

    When ordering duck, you'll most likely get some steamed pancakes, scallions, carrots and cucumber (in our case) and a sweet bean sauce. The way to eat the duck, as I saw other patrons, is to wrap a piece of duck (dipped in the sauce if you prefer it) and vegetables in the pancake and eat it as if it was, well, a wrap.

    I liked the texture and the flavor of the duck with the sauce and other ingredients, as we had it on a restaurant on Xinjiekou Beidajie (but I can't remember the name, which is why I wrote this tip here instead) and I would order the dish again.

    Slicked Peking duck Scallions, cucumber and sweet bean sauce
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    The Y files. Flavors of China: dumplings

    by marielexoteria Updated Nov 19, 2009

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    The Y files, where Y stands for "yummy!".

    Dumplings, another thing I simply had to eat while in China. Now, these dumplings were different than the ones I'm used to.

    The ones I had in China are called jiaozi and are a thin piece of dough filled with pork, vegetables, fish, you name it - and then boiled, steamed or fried. They were so delicious that I had them 3 times =)

    Yummy dumplings
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    Hot orange juice

    by marielexoteria Updated Nov 14, 2009

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    While waiting for our train to Badaling, we were walking around and found this KFC. We stopped by and had something to eat when one of us (VT globe_trekker) ordered hot orange juice. I tried it and it tasted like watered down orange soda.

    Hot orange juice (and VT globe_trekker)

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    Creepy-crawlies on sticks!

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 8, 2009

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    The Wangfujing Night Market has a selection of exotic Street food on the Snack Street. Deep fried insects, scorpions, and sea creatures can be found, along with other animals and animal parts not ordinarily consumed as food in the west. Because of this, the stalls are a bit of a novelty for both us westerners and, also, for Chinese. You'll find a great number of people pulling horrible faces at what’s on offer plus those daring to try one of the sticks that contains an insect (which can be still moving!). All of this means that it's also a big draw for having your photo taken with people handing insect sticks near their mouths!

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    Peking Duck!

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 8, 2009

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    It is thought that Beijing roast duck, like the tradition of roast turkey in America and the UK, owes its origin to the roast goose that is still popular in Europe on festive occasions. Westerners like Marco Polo brought certain European customs to China and may have introduced the concept of roasting poultry to their Chinese hosts during the Yuan Dynasty (1271 - 1368). Ducks had long been domesticated in China and the plump ducks proved to be an excellent substitute for goose. However, there is another school of thought based upon certain records that show roast duck has a much longer history dating back as far as the Northern and Southern Dynasties (420 - 589). Up until the Southern Song Dynasty (1127 - 1279), ducks were roasted in the area around Jinling, today's Nanjing. However, the later Yuan Dynasty rulers moved their capital city to Beijing from Jinling and took with them their cuisine thus making roast duck popular in the city that was eventually to make it its very own specialty.

    Preparation:
    Firstly, a suitable White Beijing Duck will be chosen for preparation. After the bird has been plucked, air is pumped between its skin and flesh. A small incision is made for the removal of the entrails.

    Secondly, and once the bird has been thoroughly cleaned, a wooden skewer is inserted through it to facilitate its hanging and ultimate heating; the body cavity is filled with water and the incision that had been made is closed.

    Thirdly, the skin of the duck is air dried and brushed with a layer of sugar.

    Fourthly, the duck is then put into a large oven, using a smokeless hardwood fuel and heating to about 270 degrees Centigrade for 30 to 40 minutes. The duck is turned frequently during the roasting process to ensure even cooking.

    Then the delicious roast duck is ready! It will be a shining date-red in colour and unique in flavour. Your chef will then carve it in front of you and place the meat on your table.
    The way to really enjoy the succulent meat is as follows: first take one of the small, thin pancakes provided and spread it with plum sauce, small slices of spring onions and then add some pieces of duck. Finally roll up the pancake, take a bite and enjoy!

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    Beijing Street Foods

    by machomikemd Written May 26, 2009

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    well I love street foods and since were near Wang Fu Jing then one must taste the various Beijing Street foods and here is a number of them (sorry I dont eat scorpions or the centipedes or the silk worms so no pictures of them here hehehehe.

    As I found out at my walking to the Donghuamen Night Food Street , Most Beijingers frequently grab something from a street stall, whether it be the ubiquitous breakfasts youtiao (a deep-fried stick of dough) and zhou (rice congee or porridge) washed down with a cup of douzhi (bean curd milk) or another type of snack such as kao yang rou chuan (a roasted lamb kebab).Other common foods found on street stalls include mala tang (spicy noodle soups), hongshu (baked sweet potatoes) and rou jiamo (braised pork in a baked bun)

    yum assorted internal organs pork large intestine beef ball.
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    Beijing Street Foods

    by machomikemd Written May 26, 2009

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    well I love street foods and since were near Wang Fu Jing then one must taste the various Beijing Street foods and here is a number of them (sorry I dont eat scorpions or the centipedes or the silk worms so no pictures of them here hehehehe.

    As I found out at my walking to the Donghuamen Night Food Street , Most Beijingers frequently grab something from a street stall, whether it be the ubiquitous breakfasts youtiao (a deep-fried stick of dough) and zhou (rice congee or porridge) washed down with a cup of douzhi (bean curd milk) or another type of snack such as kao yang rou chuan (a roasted lamb kebab).Other common foods found on street stalls include mala tang (spicy noodle soups), hongshu (baked sweet potatoes) and rou jiamo (braised pork in a baked bun)

    yum assorted internal organs pork large intestine beef ball.
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    Peach Drink

    by machomikemd Written May 25, 2009

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    Well what can I say, I love juices and peach juice is one of them. My all time fave is lemon juice but peach is in the top 5 and it was a delight that Peach Drinks are available here in Beijing and are in Tetra Pak Cartons. Again like other drinks, it has different prices depending on where you bought them and since this is a restaurant, it is much expensive at 10 RMB at 500 ml pack. (in supermarkets, it's just 5 rmb a 500 ml pack ok) and still it is dellicious! don''t forget to buy it since it is very good!

    peach drinks anyone?
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    Bottled Lemon Drinks

    by machomikemd Written May 25, 2009

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    I am fond of bottled lemon drinks and I buy it if avaiable and I must say that the best Lemon drink that I've tasted ever is here in china at this brand! it's called C 100 and is deelicious! again the price ranges vary on the place you buy it, in supermarkets, it's available in 500 ml and 1 liter bottles at 3 RMB and 6 RMB while in tourist areas it's 8 RMB a 500 ml bottle and in convenience stores, it's 6 RMB a bottle! try to taste it, it's simply the best lemon drink!!!!

    C 100 Lemon Drink! more lemon drinks
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    Chinese Sports Drink

    by machomikemd Written May 25, 2009

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    sports drinks are also available in china and they have their local version of Gatorade and Powerade and is available in 500 ml bottle and 1 liter bottles. like what I've said, it is cheaper to buy in supermarkets since it cost only 3 RMB for a 500 ml bottle while in convenience stores, it costs 7 RMB and in Tourist areas, it costs 10-12 RMB. better than water when walking in beijing as it replaces the electrolytes lost when sweating after brisk walkning.

    sports drink let's drink
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  • Hunan Cuisine

    by changqq Written Mar 24, 2009

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    Located in the south central part of the Chinese mainland, Hunan has long been known for its natural beauty. Hunan is surrounded by mountains on the east, west, and south, and by the Yangtze River on the north. Hunan's mixture of mountains and water makes it among the most beautiful provinces in China. For thousands of years, Hunan has been a major center of Chinese agriculture, growing rice, tea, and oranges. While enjoy Hunan Travel, the Hunan¡¯s cuisine is a highlight of this tour.

    Hunan cuisine, sometimes called Xiang cuisine consists of the cuisines of the Xiang River region, Dongting Lake and western Hunan Province, in China. Hunan cuisine is consisted of three styles: Xiang River style which is represented by dishes of Changsha, Dongting Lake style which is represented by dishes of Hengyang, and western Hunan style which is represented by dishes of Xiangtan.

    Hunan cuisine is one of the eight regional cuisines of China and is well known for its hot spicy flavor, fresh aroma and deep color. Common cooking techniques include stewing, frying, pot-roasting, braising, and smoking. Due to the high agricultural output of the region, ingredients for Hunan dishes are many and varied.

    Known for its liberal use of chili peppers, shallots and garlic, Xiang cuisine is known for being dry hot or purely hot, as opposed to the better known Sichuan cuisine, to which it is often compared. Known for its distinctive m¨¢l¨¤ (hot and numbing) seasoning and other complex flavor combinations, Sichuan cuisine frequently employ Sichuan peppercorns along with chilies which are often dried, and utilizes more dried or preserved ingredients and condiments. Hunan Cuisine, on the other hand, is often spicier by pure chili content, contains a larger variety of fresh ingredients, tends to be oilier, and is said to be purer and simpler in taste. Another characteristic distinguishing Hunan cuisine from Sichuan cuisine is that, in general, Hunan cuisine uses smoked and cured goods in its dishes much more frequently.

    Another feature of Hunan cuisine is that the menu changes with the seasons. In a hot and humid summer, a meal will usually start with cold dishes or a platter holding a selection of cold meats with chilies for opening the pores and keeping cool in the summer. In winter, a popular choice is the hot pot, thought to heat the blood in the cold months. A special hot pot called lover's hot pot is famous for splitting the pot into a spicy side and a milder side.
    http://www.china-tour.cn/China-Tours/

    Hengshan Mountain Zhangjiajie Forest National Park
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    Peking Duck

    by easterntrekker Written Oct 28, 2007

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    I've always wanted to try it and I was surprised that it is traditionaly served cut in little pieces and wrapped in a thin crepe with scallions and Hoisen sauce. It was very tasty and a must do . There are many restaurants in Beijing serving it so find one near your hotel.

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