Eating and Drinking, Beijing

50 Reviews

Know about this?

hide
  • Eating and Drinking
    by blueskyjohn
  • Eating and Drinking
    by blueskyjohn
  • Eating and Drinking
    by blueskyjohn
  • angelochka's Profile Photo

    for wine seekers...

    by angelochka Written Jun 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    not very useful map to find Kempinsky...

    actually it is one of the places where you can find some decent wine...in fact that's where i found it:) Kempinski Hotel Beijing Lufthansa Center, here's the adress: Liangmaqiao Road 50, Chaoyang District.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • angelochka's Profile Photo

    It IS a problem to find wine

    by angelochka Updated Jun 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I've noticed that chinese people mostly prefer drinking beer if they want to have fun and beer perfectly goes along with any food and it doesnt matter what kind of food it is, from which province..really doesnt matter. After being bit tired of chinese beer (besides beer is not my style and usuallly i prefer wine, more abt it on my HP in wine travellogue) i wanted to try a local wine and at one if the restaurants i found out they recommended Tibetan wine..?? but do they have vineyards in Tibet??:)) obviously my choice was better not to try this one...
    if you are very stubburn and still want some wine i would recommend you to go any 4-5* stars western hotel..i'm sure here they will find some for you:)

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Eating out

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 23, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    During the few days I was in Beijing, I did notice (at least in the area that I was staying in) that restaurants tended to not allow any more customers in after 8.30-9pm, so it is best to try to eat out earlier if possible.

    Was this review helpful?

  • beijingdaytrips's Profile Photo

    Tipping in China? NO WAY!

    by beijingdaytrips Written Nov 28, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many travelers to China don't really know whether they should leave a tip or not as is the custom in most other parts of the world.

    Well China is one of the exceptional countries on the world, where tipping is NOT the norm. Actually most people do not even grasp the concept of tipping and will give you your money back, or run after you with your change if you already left the establishment.

    Of course if you go to a more upscale (western) restaurant and you are very satisfied with the food/service you can leave a tip and the staff will be able to grasp the concept.

    In most 4-5* hotels a service charge of 15% is added to the bill.

    So please remember when you are traveling to China: DO NOT TIP (as you will eventually spoil it for the people who live here...)

    P.S. of course every rule has its exception: the ONLY exception on the NO TIPPING rule is tourguide(s) and/or drivers of tour busses (that means that you do not tip taxi drivers!).
    If you are on a pre-booked tour with a tourguide and a driver and they have not taken you to the well-known tourist traps such as shops where you pay over the top prices for garbage, then you CAN give them a tip. Depending on how good their service was, you can basically tip anything from RMB 10 to RMB 50. Most of the times the guides split the tip with the driver.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • claudia1975's Profile Photo

    Eating and Drinking - "how to behave" ;-)

    by claudia1975 Updated Oct 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lunch at a Beijing company

    There are several rules if you are invited for a formal lunch or dinner at on of your business partner institutes, which you should try to obey:

    1) the highest ranking person will sit at the center place of the table - usually the chair, where you face towards the door. He / she will chose this chair first and the others will not sit down until asked to do so. He will tell the other memebers of the party where to sit and will place the second and third highest ranking member of the opposite party (foreign visitors etc.) next to him.

    2) Clean your hands with the hot towels, which are served. Even if you have a cold: don't blow your nose in public or during lunch / dinner

    3) The first toast will be spoken by the head of the table. It is then expected that you toast back sometime thereafter. Say some nice friendly sentences and then lift your glass. Don't drink beer or whine without toasting. It is not commom - like in Europe - that everyone just sips on his beer. Either all drink together or you sip your tea or juice.

    4) If a new dish is served on the table it will always be tried first by the head of the table. Then he will turn the glass-tray for others to eat. Sometimes he will offer the first bite to his highest ranking guest.

    5) Often, rices or noodles are only served in the end and only on demand. Try to eat slowly because at official banquetts there will be a lot to come. Soup is the last course and indicates that the meal will be finished soon

    6) Keep the conversation pleasant. Heavy political topics, cultural misunderstandings or worrysome business issues are not a good topic during lunch or dinner.

    7) The Chinese cuisine is really the most excellent I have ever tasted. Even if you are unsure: taste everything, mostly you will really like it and will miss out if you dont give it a try.

    8) Chpstick-DONTs: dont hold them in a closed fist, dont lick their tips, dont be picky and look for the best piece of meat on the plate, dont use them to shov dishware around,

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Food and Dining
    • Work Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • ghweeh's Profile Photo

    BUN DIY

    by ghweeh Written Jun 27, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    BUN - which I believe must be one of the favourite & popular local snack. As we had it for two different meals at two different restaurants in Beijing. Hard to compare which is the best as they all taste about the same. Wherase the one near to Tiananmen Square taste better as the bun is softer.... To enjoy your food, it's best to DIY or "engaged" someone to do it for you. We got a 'professional" to make it for us as he follows a proper "procedure"!!! ;) So it was the BEST bun we ever had!!! :)

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dining out with business associates

    by tan1415 Written Mar 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was taken out to dinner with a chinese associate. I must say it's partially his to blame.
    We went to a mongolian restaurant. Eating inside a Yurt and being sang to with mongolian folksongs.
    VEry picturesque and one of my best dining experiences in my life.Alas I dont know where or what is it's name. So all i can do is describe my experience there.

    Anyway even though everything seems touristy...there was nothing touristy about teh food. It was just EXCELLENT.As a junior partner all I had to do was nod and enjoy the food. And boy did i enjoy it.
    There was multiple courses ,but the main dish was real tender roast lamb. I think it was so young and tender the ribs was as thick as my chopstick.
    It was AWESOME. Best meat dish ever.
    They also had exotic meats like camel and mule. Even a special fish that only lives in the Gobi.LOL

    Well the one thing I learned...your hosts will order SO much that as a guest you just can't eat anymore.
    HAHAHA...he didnt expect me. I ate SO much...that they were forced to order more stuff. It seemed I ate out the menu.After a few reorders I noticed what he was doing and stopped eating. Believe me..I was stuffed, but the food was so great i just keep wanting to taste it all and of course everyone was forced to join up.

    Anyway something to keep in mind if you're eating out with your associates...

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • pettevi's Profile Photo

    Tea tasting

    by pettevi Written Feb 9, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tea tastings

    You can stop by any tea shop and have a taste of their offerings. The tea girls will prepare the tea infront of you and while you are at it tell you a short story. They are very attractive and it is difficult to leave the shop without buying some. The prices aren't that bad either.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • blue_sky04's Profile Photo

    Beijing Roast Duck or Peking Duck

    by blue_sky04 Updated Dec 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The famous Beijing Roast Duck (Peking Duck)

    Peking Roast Duck is a famous duck dish from northeastern China. The Chinese specially like Beijing duck for its thin & crispy skin. Most restaurants will make two dishes out of one duck -- one with thin slices of skin with a small layer of fat underneath, and another one with the duck meat.

    The history of the Beijing Duck can be traced as far back as the Yuan dynasty (1206 - 1368). By the time of the early 15th century it had become one of the favorite dishes of the imperial Ming family.

    Peking Duck, which is served traditionally, consists of the crispy skin, steamed "mu-shi" flour pancakes, slivered spring onions, hoisin & plum sauce.
    How to eat the roast duck? Deep a piece of duck skin (already chopped into small pieces) into the hoisin and plum sauce, then place it on a pancake& adds spring onion. The mixture is rolled up and eaten with the fingers.

    The duck meat can be eaten the same way as the skin, but you can ask the restaurant to fry the meat. The remaining duck meat is usually chopped up, stir-fried, and eaten wrapped in fresh lettuce.

    This duck dish is delicious so if you visit Beijing, you should not miss this traditional and well known Beijing roast duck.

    Unfortunately I don't remember the name of resto in Beijing where I eat Beijing duck. The price for the Beijing duck and two other dishes I ate there was about RMB 200.

    One of the Chinese restaurants in my town, Surabaya-Indonesia, serves good Beijing Duck. I think the taste is even better than beijing duck which I ate in the restaurant in Beijing

    The Chinese resto in Surabaya which serves Beijing duck is the Duck King. This is one of the best Chinese Restaurants in town. So, if you visit Surabaya, you can stop by this resto and try its Beijing Duck. It costs Rp. 135,000 (approx US$ 14) for one duck or Rp. 92,500 (US$ 9.3) for half. If you want the remaining meat to be fried, you should pay extra Rp. 10,000 (US$ 1).

    Picture here is from: http://www.chinahighlights.com/

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • yellowbell's Profile Photo

    Chopsticks or go hungry

    by yellowbell Written Oct 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Forks are not readily available so learn to use your chopsticks. Our tour guide said you can make an X mark in your fingers and they'd understand you need a fork. It's hard struggling to use the plastic chopsticks, I better learn to use that skillfully next time.

    Restaurants in China are really so big and one restaurant the tour guide brought us can seat around 800 people in just one of the banquet halls. Tour groups were separated into domestic and foreign tourists.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • a native student talk Beijing in Yahoo messager.

    by flyingc2004 Updated Aug 2, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I am a undergraduate student in Beijing. I wanna study in US college and i will take a TOEFL exam in Oct 15th.
    i want to practise my English. So I leave my message here,to look for somebody who wanna go to Beijing.
    I could talk with you about beijing in all you want to know.
    yahoo messager:FlyingC2004@yahoo.com

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • nepalgoods's Profile Photo

    Cabbage

    by nepalgoods Updated Jan 19, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cabbage

    You know it is winter in Beijing, when you see all the trucks and bicycles loaded with cabbage. That will be in the middle of November.

    Cabbage is a great vegetable! It has many vitamins and it can be stored on the balcony (Seems to be the main purpose for to have a balcony in Peking) for a few months in winter. Until only recently cabbage has been the only source of vitamins during winter for the Chinese.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Work Abroad
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Round tables

    by magor65 Written Jan 18, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In a Chinese restaurant

    I love those round tables with their central part movable. What a good idea to let everybody have their share of a dish easily. Add to this great food and nice interior and you have a meal in Chinese style.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Saagar's Profile Photo

    The Qing approach to restaurant order taking

    by Saagar Written Jun 2, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Qing Dynasty  PDA

    In this fancy restaurant where everything was Qing style and archaic - even the language used - the Qing dynasty order takers themselves dressed as Qing princesses, took the menu order by PDA, communicated through hidden microphones and earphones to the kitchen, and had it all set before a coquette "Ni Jinxian!" to us confirmed the order done.
    "New China?"

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • Saagar's Profile Photo

    The Qing approach to restaurant order taking

    by Saagar Written Jun 2, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Qing Dynasty  PDA

    In this fancy restaurant where everything was Qing style and archaic - even the language used - the Qing dynasty order takers themselves dressed as Qing princesses, took the menu order by PDA, communicated through hidden microphones and earphones to the kitchen, and had it all set before a coquette "Ni Jinxian!" to us confirmed the order done.
    "New China?"

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Beijing

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

104 travelers online now

Comments

View all Beijing hotels