Beihai Park, Beijing

4.5 out of 5 stars 90 Reviews

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  • Red plates ith wishes, Beihai park
    Red plates ith wishes, Beihai park
    by loja
  • Jade Flowery Isle, Beihai park
    Jade Flowery Isle, Beihai park
    by loja
  • Beihai park , lake
    Beihai park , lake
    by loja
  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Bei Hai Park - Next to Forbidden City

    by SLLiew Written Sep 20, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bei Hai Park is just a 10 minutes walk if you exit the Forbidden City on the North Exit and just across the street from the West Exit of Jing Shan Park.

    It is a smaller imperial garden than Summer Palace. The highlight is the Lamma Buddhist Temple on the island of the Bei Hai Lake.

    A long climb all the way to the very top of the Lamma Pagoda gives a wonderful view of the Forbidden city and a panaromic view of Beijing City.

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  • Princess_Emily's Profile Photo

    Wildlife Park

    by Princess_Emily Written Apr 18, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lion
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    Located not far from The Great Wall (Badaling Section) is a wildlife park where the animals have ample space to run free, much better than being kept in a cage. It was loads of fun being able to get up close to pet these beasts.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Budget Travel
    • Zoo

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  • Princess_Emily's Profile Photo

    Wildlife Park

    by Princess_Emily Written Apr 18, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    White Tigers
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    Located not far from The Great Wall (Badaling Section) is a wildlife park where the animals have ample space to run free, much better than being kept in a cage. It was loads of fun being able to get up close to pet these beasts.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Zoo
    • School Holidays

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  • Gryphon25's Profile Photo

    Cool down on the lake

    by Gryphon25 Written Sep 20, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    After a long hot day exploring the forbidden city, you need to cool down and relax.
    Start at the south entrance of the forbidden city and then exit at the north gate. Turn left and head towards Beihai park. To rent a paddle boat between 4 people is really cheap. you can slowly work your way round the lake trailing your hand in the water. It's definitely worth it.

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  • apuffaday's Profile Photo

    Visit when lotus bloom

    by apuffaday Written Sep 15, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit Beihai Park during the end of summer, in August, when the lotus are blooming. Like all the parks in Beijing, these are wonderful places to see locals sing in a gazebo, play chesse and cards, and various Chinese excercises.

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  • violett's Profile Photo

    taking a nice walk!

    by violett Updated Aug 27, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When I was a child, I lived with my grandma nearby. And we took countless walk here. Not because of those beautiful memories, but the beautiful gardens and lotus flowers (in summer), the maze in the stone cave, wonderful temples and pavillions, and the famous restaurant "Fang shan", whose cooker used to cook for the Emperor in the Qing dynasty ("Fang" means copy, "Shan" means "dinner for the Emperor"), let me write this tip for u.
    "Fang Shan" is in the park, located in the Buildings of Yilantang (the hall by Rippling lack), Daoningzhai ( an imperial Study ) and Qinglan Huayun ( full bloom in the Sunlight )
    +86 10 64041184
    +86 10 64033842
    http://www.btxx.cn.net/famous/corporation/fs2.htm

    If u are lucky, u can also see old beijingers do Taiji practice (but for me as a christian, it is not a good way to keep u fit, I think,so Don't LEARN it) or sing beijing opera in the pavillions. Most of them are retired and build small groups to play the traditional instruments and sing, just for fun.
    On the lake there are also traditional boat u can take.

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  • angelochka's Profile Photo

    White Dagoba

    by angelochka Written Aug 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    White Dagoba is the highest point in Beihai Park

    White Dagoba is located in Beihai Park in the center of downtown Beijing and became an important landmark of the city, it was built in 1651 during the Qing Dynasty. 35.9 meters high, the inverted-bowl-style lamaist dagoba on top of White Dagoba Hill just looks beautiful and majestic...
    that's how i saw it when was taking this picture at sunset

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Exceptional_World's Profile Photo

    Chillin' at Beihai Park

    by Exceptional_World Written Apr 8, 2007
    Beihai Park from the main entrance
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    We bought a ramen bowl and two Tsingtao's at the local deli near the entrance for our relaxing day at the park. They can fill you up with hot water for your noodles, too. Then go grab a seat with a good view and crack open your beer and chill as long as you want. Your only bother will be the person wanting to take your empties for recycling.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Beihai Park

    by clairegeordio Written Jan 20, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beihai park
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    Unfortunately we only had time to really pass through Beihai park on the way from the Forbidden City to the Drum tower, so only really spent half an hour there with a picnic overlooking the lake.
    It was built in the 10th Century and has an area of over 700,000 square metres. Water covers over half of this area.
    The main feature of the park is the White Dagoba on Jade island, which is a 130 ft (36m) Buddhist shrine constructed in 1651.
    At the time of writing, the entrance cost was 10RMB.

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  • limledi's Profile Photo

    Nine-Dragon Wall

    by limledi Updated Dec 18, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nine-Dragon Wall

    The Nine-Dragon Wall lies north of the Five-Dragon Pavilion. It was built in 1756 and is one of three walls of its kind in China. It was made of seven-color glaze bricks. Nine complete dragons playing in the clouds are decorated on both sides of the wall.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • JBourne's Profile Photo

    Beihai Park - Go where the Chinese go

    by JBourne Updated Nov 26, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A water painter drawing England for us
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    Beihai park is located close to the Forbidden City, about a ten minute walk west from the north gate, or if you are lazy a taxi ride will only set you back 12r (80p).

    The park is a very beautiful and serene place with a vast lake directly in front of you as you walk in the main gates (the lake takes up over half of the site). This park was originally the exclusive haunt of the emperors and empresses who lived here in the winter palace. Now its open to anyone and everyone who requires a respite from the polluted streets.

    There are water painters here for your entertainment (see photos) and relaxing long walks. We went on a Saturday and it seems so did everyone else. We were surrounded by a group of young students at one point, who all wanted to have a photograph taken with us. However it wasn't difficult to find a quiet place to sit and enjoy the scenery

    You can go out on the lake too, and we hired a little motor boat for an hour.

    There is a restaurant here too but you have to book in advance. Also there are plenty of stalls selling water - which you'll need a lot of if you go out on the lake in high summer.

    This is worth spending a few hours walking around in. We weren't able to go up to the White Pagoda on the hill as it was under renovation (as everything is for the olympics) but no matter. It was fascinating seeing the refurbishment work going on - and the slight young girls working as labourers was surprising. Not exactly something you often see in the west.

    Do visit this park, it is valuable a breathing space in the polluted city and worth a wander.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • National/State Park
    • Architecture

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Bejhai Park (cont)

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Oct 9, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beijing - Bejhai Park

    Beihai Park is composed of Tuancheng (Circulate City), Jionghua Islet, Eastern Shore Scenic Area and Northwestern Shore Scenic Area, with Jionghua Islet as the center. The small island is connected with other parts by a stone bridge and ferry boats.

    Bejhai Park is in the city centre a little to the north of Gugun. In the X-th century governors Lao constructed the imperial palace surrounded by magnificent park. The big artificial lake (in translation- Northern sea) in the middle of which filled Nefrit island was dug. The lake gets waters from the river Jondin.

    After new ruling dynasty Zin erected own "Forbidden city", Bejhai became a vacation spot and entertainments of an imperial court yard. During Yuan epoch the ensemble was updated and expanded. Bejhai became a residence of the Chinese monarches again.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Beihai Park

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Oct 9, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beihai Park

    This park in the center of Beijing has an area of more than 70 hectares with a water surface of 39 hectares. To its north is Shishahai Lake and to its east is Jingshan Park. The Palace Museum is to its southeast, a short distance.

    The imperial court of the Liao Dynasty built a temperory palace on the site of present Beihai Park in the 10th century. During the following Jin Dynasty a lake was dug. The excavated earth was piled to make a hill. Around the lake and on the hill palatial halls, corridors and pavilions were erected. The imperial court of the Yuan Dynasty which came after the Jin expanded Jionghua Islet in the lake and made it the center of its capital Dadu City.

    During the Ming Dynasty five pavilions linked with zigzag bridges were built in the northwestern part of the lake. During the regin of Emperor Qian Long (1736-1796) a large-scale project was carried on over 30 years, making the palace a grand imperial garden.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Beihai Park

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 21, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beihai Park was transformed into a royal garden around a 1,000 years ago. This imperial park is set around artificial lakes and the finest example of a classical Chinese garden. It was once reserved exclusively for the imperial family. There are pavilions, temples, halls, and covered walkways, and you can rent a rowboat for the lake. There is a restaurant within the park which is said to have been Dowager Empress Cixi’s favourite. Her appetite could extend to 120 courses!.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Tuancheng: The Round City - Part 2

    by mke1963 Updated Aug 18, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    The ravages of time and subsequent emperors' desires changed the landscape of this little 'city' but not enormously. in 1669, an earthquake damaged the Chenguangdian, but it was rebuilt in identical form.
    In 1746, Qianlong, who had a special affinity with this little place for some reason, landscaped the gardens and added a number of pavilions.
    Perhaps the biggest change was when Ci Xi converted the Chengguangdian into an altar for the huge jade statue of Buddha brought back from Myanmar by the monk Ming Kuan.
    Empress Dowager Ci Xi used to visit the Round City regularly, but in a rather curious manner. She would get the palace eunuchs and maids to set up a country market so that she could take part in cameos roles of real-life. (She did the same thing at the Summer Palace as well).
    In 1900 the invading British and French forces damaged the giant Buddha, and many other objects were looted.
    Some 50 or so years later, Zhou Enlai intervened to save the Round City from destruction when the road outside, Jingshan Qianjie, was being widened.
    Today the Tuancheng is truly serene place, with some of the most graceful trees in the world sitting atop the terrace. The cypress was given the title "The Marquis of Shade" by Emperor Qianlong in gratitude for the shade it provided him over the years. Nearby, the stunningly beautiful lace-ark pine was named "The General" for unknown reasons. The Chengguangdian remains one of my favourite buildings in China, even though some of the styling is probably from the 1900s rather than the Ming period.

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