Forbidden City, Beijing

387 Reviews

North of Tiananmen Square

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • The Forbidden City
    The Forbidden City
    by loja
  • Forbidden City
    Forbidden City
    by loja
  • The Forbidden City
    The Forbidden City
    by loja
  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    UNESCO: The Forbidden City

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Forbidden City, Beijing
    4 more images

    The Forbidden City is called "The Palace Museum" now, cause it is no longer a Forbidden City as everyone can visit the Palace now with admission charge. It is located in the central of Beijing, which was the imperial palace of Ming and Qing dynasties. This palace was to constructed in 1407, and completed in 1420. There were 24 emperors from the Ming and Qing dynasties living here with nearly 500 years old history. Emperor Yongle was the first emperor who lived here. Among others, Emperor Jiajing of the Ming Dynasty and Emperor Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty made many changes of the Palace complex. In 1911 revolution, Dr. Sun Yat-Sen broke out and overthrew the Qing Dynasty, ending 2,000 years of Chinese feudal monarchy. In 1925, it became a museum named "The Palace Museum" till today. It was declared as UNESCO site in 1987.

    I visited the Forbidden City on 7th Oct 2011. I managed to queue for the ticket at 8am on the last day of National Holiday. During the National Holiday, it was too crowded to queue for the ticket, and definitely not a right time to visit. The TV news announced that The Palace Museum has the most visitors among all the attractions in China during National Holiday. The reason is because this is the "Must" place to visit for the Chinese once in their lifetime.

    Before I went, I studied what to expect and how long would it take to see it all. Well, the answer is I don't think anyone can see it all in one day because it was so huge, hall after hall with small alleys with red brick walls. If you go with a tour guide, you will most likely miss out a lot of halls and palaces on the east and west, cause they might only show you the important palaces from Meridian Gate (South) to Gate of Divine Prowess (North).

    There was a lady gave us some introduction of the museum, and selling us a map with guide book (Y5) while we were in the queue. The map and the guide book were very useful, especially the map gave me the sequence number, so I could avoid wasting time going back to wrong directions. The map and the guide are in bilingual, Chinese and English. So, if you see someone selling maps in your queue, take a look at it!! The map's sequence to visit the palaces as the following:

    Outer Court:
    1) Meridian Gate (Wumen Gate) - In my review
    2) Hall of Martial Valor (Wuyin Hall) - In my review
    3) Gate of Supreme Harmony (Taihe Gate) - In my review
    4) Hall of Supreme Harmony (Taihe Hall) - In my review
    5) Hall of Central Harmony (Zhonghe Hall) - In my review
    6) Hall of Preserving Harmony (Baohe Hall)- In my review

    Inner Court:
    7) Gate of Heavenly Purity (Qianqing Gate) - In my review
    8) Palace of Heavenly Purity (Qianqing Palace)- In my review
    9) Hall of Union (Jiaotai Hall) - In my review
    10) Palace of Earthly Tranquility (Kunning Palace) -In my review
    11) Gate of Earthly Tranquility (Kunning Gate)
    12) Imperial Garden - In my review
    13) Hall of Imperial Peace (Qinan Hall)- In my review

    West Palaces:
    14) Palace of Gathered Elegance (Chuxiu Palace) - In my review.
    15) Palace of Universal Happiness (Xianfu Palace)
    16) Palace of External Spring (Changchun Palace) - In my review.
    17) Palace of Blessings to Mother Earth (Yikun Palace) -In my review.
    18) Palace of Eternal Longevity (Yongshou Palace)
    19) Hall of Great Supremacy (Taiji Hall) -In my review.
    20) Hall of Mental Cultivation (Yangxin Hall) - In my review.

    East Palaces:
    21) Hall for Abstinence (Zhai Palace)
    22) Hall of Benevolence (Jingren Palace) - In my review.
    23) Hall of Celestial Favor (Chengqian Palace)
    24) Hall of Quintessence (Zhongcui Palace) - In my review.
    25) Hall of Justice (Jingyang Palace) -In my review.
    26) Hall of Eternal Harmony (Yonghe Palace)
    27) Hall of Prolonged Happiness (Yangxi Palace)
    28) Hall of Ancestral Worship (Fengxian Hall)

    Far East Palaces:
    29) Nine-Dragon Screen- In my review.
    30) Gate of Peace and Longevity (Ningshou Gate)
    31) Hall of the Norms of Government (Huangji Hall)- In my review.
    32) Palace of Peace and Longevity (Ningshou Palace)- In my review.
    Garden of the Palace of Peace and Longevity (Ning Shou Gong Garden)-In my review.
    - Pavilion of Bestowing Wine
    - Studio of Ancient Glory
    Pavilion of Cheerful Melodies. -In my review.
    33) Hall of Character Cultivation (Yang Xing Dian)-In my review.
    34) Hall of Joyful Longevity (Leshou Hall) -In my review.
    35) Hall of Harmony (Yihe House)- In my review.
    36) The Well of Concubine Zhen (Zhenfei Well)- In my review.
    37) Gate of Divine Prowess (Shenwu Gate)- In my review.

    I left Forbidden City at 4pm, and managed to glance through important halls and gardens. I did not have time to see most of the museums' displays. Good luck!!!

    In Chinese:
    Forbidden City- 紫禁城 (Zi Jin Cheng)
    Palace Museum- 故宫博物院 (Gu Gong Bo Wu Yuan)

    Opening Hours:
    April 1- Oct 31 (8:30-17:00)
    Nov 1- March 31 (8:30-16:30)

    Admission:
    April 1- Oct 31 (Y60)
    Nov 1- March 31 (Y40)

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    36) The Well of Concubine Zhen

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Forbidden City, Beijing
    3 more images

    This is a well-known well in the Chinese history. Concubine Zhen was thrown into this well from the order of Empress Dowager Ci Xi due to political issue and power in the imperial palace. The signboard was written as:

    " Concubine Zhen was the beloved concubine of Emperor Guangxu. She sympathized with and supported the Emperor's views on constitutional reform and modernization. After the reform was suppressed by Empress Dowager Cixi, the Emperor was taken into custody in Yingtai while the Concubines was confined in houses under guards. When the Eight-Power Allied Force attacked Beijing in 1900, Concubine Zhen was thrown into and drowned in this well by Eunuch Cui Yugui at the order of Cixi. "

    "In 1901, she was posthumously conferred the title of Noble Concubine, the third-level consort. Concubine Jin, her sister, set up the mourning chamber for her to praise her sincerity and determination. "

    NEXT: Gate of Divine Prowess (Shenwu Gate)

    In Chinese: 珍妃井 (Zhen Fei Jing)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    35) Hall of Harmony

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hall of Harmony, Forbidden City
    4 more images

    Hall of Harmony is a link building with Pavilion of Prospective Happiness (Jing Qi Ge). This building complex is located northern part of the far east Forbidden City. Currently, this hall is a museum displays imperial gifts now.

    The signboard is written as:

    " Constructed in 1776 during the Qing Dynasty, this hall is linked with Jing Qi Ge (Pavilion of Prospective Happiness) by a covered corridor. It was built for Emperor Qianlong's retirement. The words "Yi He" mean preserving one's vital energy."

    NEXT: The Well of Concubine Zhen (Zhenfei Well)

    In Chinese: 颐和轩 (Yi He Xuan)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    34) Hall of Joyful Longevity

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hall of Joyful Longevity, Forbidden City
    4 more images

    Hall of Joyful Longevity is located north of Hall of Character Cultivation. Empress Dowager Ci Xi had live here before. It is a museum that display giant jade from the Imperial. The signboard was written as:

    " This hall was constructed in 1776 during the Qing dynasty as a copy of Chun Hua Xuan (Purity Studio) in Chang Chun Yuan (Garden of Eternal Spring) for Emperor Qianlong's retirement. In front of the hall, on the wall of the covered corridor, there is a stone inscription reproducing the Rubbings of Model Calligraphy of Jingsheng Studio. Since the Qing Dynasty, a huge jade carving titled " Yu the Great Quelling the Floods" has been preserved in the hall. It is the largest jade carving in the Palace Museum. After the celebration of the 60th birthday, Empress Dowager CiXi lived in the west chamber of this hall. The words "Le Shou" come from The Analects of Confucius, meaning "intelligent people are happy people, and benevolent live long."

    NEXT: Hall of Harmony (Yihe House)

    In Chinese: 乐寿堂 ( Le Shou Tang)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    33) Hall of Character Cultivation

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gate of Character Cultivation, Forbidden City
    2 more images

    Hall of Character Cultivation is located at the center between Garden of the Palace of Peace and Longevity and Pavilion of Cheerful Melodies. It was mostly used as a function hall in the Qing Dynasty. The signboard was written as:

    " This hall was constructed in 1776 during the Qing Dynasty, as a copy of Yang Xin Dian (Hall of Moral Cultivation). Emperor Qianlong planned to live here after his abdication but never did. In December 1781, the emperor held a banquet in this hall to entertain princes, high-ranking officials, Mongolian chieftains and Manchu nobilities. When Empress Dowager Ci Xi lived in Le Shou Tang (Hall of Joyful Longevity) in the late Qing Dynasty, she dined in this hall in Dong Nuan Ge (EEast Chamber of Warmth). In 1903 when Emperor Guangxu lived here, he and Empress Dowager Ci Xi would meet the wives of foreign envoys in the hall. In 1909 a celebration was held here when Empress Dowager Long Yu was given a title of honor. The words "Yang Xing" are derived from Mencius, meaning "cultivating one's character to reach benevolence."

    NEXT: Hall of Joyful Longevity (Leshou Hall)

    In Chinese: 养性殿 (Yang Xing Dian)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    Pavilion of Cheerful Melodies

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pavilion of Cheerful Melodies, Forbidden City
    4 more images

    The Pavilion of Cheerful Melodies is located far east of Forbidden City, east of the Hall of Character Cultivation. This was a performing stage that emperors and empresses enjoyed watching opera in here. The signboard was written as:

    " This pavilion was constructed in 1776 (the 41st year of the Qianlong reign period of the Qing Dynasty). In 1817 (the 22nd year of the Jiaqing reign period), a three-story opera stage, the largest stage in the palace, was added to the pavilion. The pavilion is 20.71 meters high, with a construction area of 685.94 square meters. The upper story of the stage is called Happiness Stage; the middle part, Position Stage; and the lower story, Longevity Stage. Longevity Stage has five trapdoors in the ceiling, leading to Position Stage. By the trapdoors, there are capstans and wheels, allowing dramatic entrance and exits of supernatural beings, ghosts and demons. During large-scare performances actors and actresses appeared on the three stories at the same time. The stage can hold 1,000 people. This pavilion faces Yue Shi Lou (Pavilion for Reading) to the north. The two words "Chang Yin" signify loud and cheerful sounds. "

    In Chinese: 畅音阁 (Chang Yin Ge)

    On the north of this hall is the Pavilion of Reading. The signboard was written as:

    " Built in 1776 during the Qing Dynasty, this pavilion has two stories. Every New Year's Day and on the emperor's birthday, the emperor and empress, princes and high ranking officials watched operas here. Officials sat in the covered passages on both sides. On her 60th birthday, Empress Dowager Ci Xi was accompanied by Emperor Guangxu, his empress and officials in watching performances for more than 10 days at this hall. The words "Yue Shi" mean making correct judgement of reality from watching stage performances. "

    NEXT: Hall of Character Cultivation (Yang Xing Dian)

    In Chinese: 阅是楼 (Yue Shi Lou)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    Garden of the Palace of Peace and Longevity

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pavilion of Bestowing Wine, Forbidden City
    4 more images

    Garden of the Palace of Peace and Longevity is another imperial garden in Forbidden City. It is located on the far east Forbidden City, west of Hall of Character Cultivation (Yang Xing Dian). Pavilion of Bestowing Wine (Xi Shang Tang) and Studio of Ancient Glory (Gu Hua Xuan) were the two main pavilions I visited.

    The signboard for the Garden was written as:

    " Also known as Qianlong Garden, it was first constructed in 1776 (the 41 year of the Qianlong reign period of the Qing Dynasty) as an imperial garden for Emperor Qianlong after his abdication.
    This garden is 160 meters from south to north, and 37 meters from east to west. It is adjacent to the palace wall in the west and the palace in the east. This garden has four courtyards, and southern and northern axial lines. Yan Qi Men (Gate of Lasting Happiness), Gu Hua Xuan (Pavilion of Ancient Glory), Sui Chu Tang (Hall of Nostalgia) and Song Xiu Ting (Pavilion of Paramount Elegance) are along the southern axial line; and Cui Shang Lou (Pavilion of Excellent Views), Bi Luo Ting (Green Shell Pavilion), and Fu Wang Ge (Tower of Elusive Dreams) are located along the northern axial line. The garden includes over 20 pavilions, towers and other buildings, green pine and cypress trees, delicate rockeries and winding paths, showing the exquisite layout of the garden in South China and the gorgeous features of the imperial gardens. "

    In Chinese: 宁寿宫花园 (Ning Shou Gong Hua Yuan)

    Special features of Pavilion of Bestowing Wine (Xi Shang Tang) are interesting. The signboard was written as:

    " Built in 1776 during the Qing Dynasty, this pavilion is also known as Liu Bei Ting (Pavilion of Floating Cups) because of the "Ditch of Floating Cups." This pavilion was designed to reflect a scene described in the famous Chinese work Preface to Poems from Orchid Pavilion by Wang Xizhi. An excerpt is quoted here: " Cups flow along the winding water and we appreciated music while watching operas." The ditch is the pavilion is 27 meters long. The water in the ditch comes from a well behind the rockery. Water is fetched from the well, and held in a vessel. The water flows to the ditch from the holes at the bottom of the water vessel and then streams back to the well. To amuse themselves, the emperor and his officials would sit by the ditch composing poems and allow cups of wine to float around in the circulating water. Similar pavilions also can be found in the Zhongnanhai and Yuanmingyuan palace compounds and at the Chengde Summer Resort. "

    Studio of Ancient Glory (Gu Hua Xuan) is another interesting pavilion in the Garden. The signboard was written as:

    " Located on the central axis of Ning Shou Gong Hua Yuan (Garden of the Palace of Peace and Longevity) this studio was constructed with a gable-rolling roof in 1776 during the Qing Dynasty. The ceiling is decorated with nanmu-wood carvings. A board, with an inscription written by Emperor Qianlong, hangs on the facade of the studio. An ancient Chinese catalpa tree, which was here before this building was built, stands in front of the studio. "

    NEXT: Pavilion of Cheerful Melodies

    In Chinese: 古华轩 (Gu Hua Xuan)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    32) Palace of Peace and Longevity

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palace of Peace and Longevity, Forbidden City
    3 more images

    Palace of Peace and Longevity is located north of Hall of Norms of Governments. This hall has significant history for Emperor Qianlong.

    The signboard was written as:

    " Constructed in the Ming Dynasty, this palace was originally named Ren Shou Gong (Palace of Benevolence and Longevity). After renovation in 1689 during the Qing Dynasty, it was renamed Ning Shou Gong Hou Dian ( Rear Hall of the Palace of Peace and Longevity). In 1776, it was reconstructed as a copy of Jun Ning Gong (10- Hall of Earthly Tranquility) and the board reading "Ning Shou Gong" (Palace of Peace and Longevity) was moved here. When Emperor Qianlong prepared for his abdication, he offered sacrifices to the gods in this hall. In celebration of Emperor Qianlong's 80th birthday and Emperor Jianqing's 50th birthday, banquets were held here. The words " Ning Shou" come from the Book of History, and imply good health and longevity. "

    NEXT: Garden of the Palace of Peace and Longevity (Ning Shou Gong Garden)

    In Chinese: 宁寿宫 (Ning Shou Gong)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    31) Hall of the Norms of Government

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hall of the Norms of Government, Forbidden City
    4 more images

    Hall of the Norms of Government is the largest hall in the far-east Forbidden City. It is located between Gate of Peace and Longevity and Palace of Peace and Longevity. There were many important imperial history events held here.

    The signboard was written as:

    " Constructed in 1689 during Qing Dynasty, this hall was originally named Ning Shou Gong (Palace of Peace and Longevity) but was renamed Huang Ji Dian (Hall of the Norms of Government) after its renovation in 1776. This hall was renovated again in 1802 and 1884. It is nine bays wide and five bays deeps, with a double roof in the wudian (thatched hall) style covered with yellow glazed tiles. On the lunar New Year of 1796, Emperor Qianlong handed the throne over to his son and a grand ceremony was held in Tai He Dian ( Hall of Supreme Harmony). On the fourth day of first lunar month, Emperor Qianlong held a banquet for 1,000 elderly men at this hall. Empress Dowager was buried, her coffin was placed in this hall. the words "Huang Ji" in Chinese are from the Book of History, and mean "the emperor sets the supreme rules."

    NEXT: Palace of Peace and Longevity (Ningshou Palace)

    In Chinese: 皇极殿 (Huang Ji Dian)

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    25) Hall of Justice

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012
    Hall of Justice, Forbidden City
    1 more image

    Hall of Justice is just next to Hall of Quintessence. It was the palace for imperial concubines during Qing Dynasty. It was also a library on the north side of the hall. Emperors used to come here to read and write poetry.

    The signboard was written as :

    " Constructed in 1420 during the Ming dynasty, this hall was originally named Chang Yang Gong (Hall of Eternal Justice) and was later renovated in 1686. This hall has two courtyards. The rear hall was the imperial studio. In the Ming Dynasty, it was used by imperial concubines and in the Qing Dynasty it served as a library. In this building's Xue Shi Tang (Hall of Studying Poetry), Emperor Qianlong once preserved the Mao Edition of the Book of Songs, written by Emperor Gaozong of the Song Dynasty and Paintings for the Book of Songs, by Ma Hexhi. Location in the northeast part of the six palaces, the location of this hall corresponds with the northeast symbol "gen" in the Eight Diagrams of The Book of Changes. The words "Jing Yang" mean venerating justice.

    NEXT: Nine-Dragon Screen

    In Chinese: 景阳宫 (Jing Yang Gong)

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    24) Hall of Quintessence

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012
    Hall of Quintessence, Forbidden City
    3 more images

    Hall of Quintessence is another west palace that I had visited. This hall had less crowd during my visit, it could be less interesting as the buildings on west side are pretty much the same. But I think they have different stories and history background as compare to other halls.

    The signboard was written as:

    " Constructed in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty, this hall was originally named Xian Yang Gong (Hall of Universal Justice) and was renamed Zhong Cui Gong (Hall of Quintessence) in 1535. In 1571, the front hall was named Xing Long Dian (Hall of the Rising Dragon) and the rear hall, Sheng Zhe Dian (Hall of the Sages). Later , the hall was renamed Zhong Cui Gong. In the Ming Dynasty, it was used by imperial concubines and once served as the palace of the crown prince. In the Qing Dynasty, the imperial concubines were its primary occupants. Empress Dowager Ci An and Empress Long Yu, wife of Emperor Guangxu, lived here. Empress Dowager Ci An passed away in this hall. The words 'Zhong Cui' mean 'gathering quintessence.' Zhong Cui Gong is symmetrical with Chu Xiu Gong (Palace of Gathering Excellence), one of the six palaces in the west. These two halls are located along opposite sides of the central axial line of the inner court. "

    NEXT: Hall of Justice (Jingyang Palace)

    In Chinese: 钟粹宫 (Zhong Cui Gong)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    22) Hall of Benevolence

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012
    Hall of Benevolence, Forbidden City
    2 more images

    After visiting the west halls, I continued to visit halls on the east side. I still got lost on my way to the east side, with so many red walls and palaces along the way with similar architecture. I only managed to see three halls on the east sides, including this hall, Hall of Quintessence and Hall of Justice.

    The signboard of this hall was written as:

    " Built in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty, this hall was originally named Chang An Gong (Hall of Eternal Peace) and renamed Jing Ren Gong in 1535. It was renovated in 1655 during Qing Dynasty, but the original layout was left unchanged. In the Ming and Qing dynasties imperial concubines used it. In 1654 (Qing Dynasty) Xuanye (Emperor Kangxi) was born in this hall. Imperial Concubine Xi of Emperor Yongzheng, Imperial Concubine Wan of the Emperor Xianfeng and Imperial Concubine Zhen of Emperor Guangxuonce lived here. Jing Ren Gong and Yong Shou Gong (Hall of Immortality), which is one of the six western palaces, are located symmetrically along the central axial line of the inner court. The name of this hall comes from saying in The Analects of Confucius; " The intelligent are happy; and the benevolent live long."

    NEXT: Hall of Quintessence (Zhongcui Palace)

    In Chinese: 景仁宫 (Jing Ren Gong)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    20) Hall of Mental Cultivation

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012
    Hall of Mental Cultivation, Forbidden City
    3 more images

    Hall of Mental Cultivation is my favorite among all the buildings at the west of Forbidden City. It looks like a temple with a " 凸 " shape building from the front. It was a where emperors lived during Qing Dynasty.

    The signboard was written as:

    " Constructed in 1537 (the 16th year of the Jiajing reign period of the Ming Dynasty), this building, in the shape of " 工" , is divided into two halls-the front and rear halls, which are linked by covered corridors, and surrounded by side corridors. Eight emperors of the Qing Dynasty, starting with Emperor Yongzheng, lived here. There is a throne in the front hall, where the emperor handled state affairs and received his officials. On the west, there is a large room between two small rooms. The large room was for the emperor's officials in charge of confidential work, and a small room at the back of it is famous San Xi Tang (Room of Three Rarities). The east room has two thrones, separated by a yellow gauze curtain, behind which joint empresses Dowager Ci Xi and Ci An supervised the court in the late Qing Dynasty. The rear hall was where the emperor slept. In the center of the hall there is a kang (a heatable brick bed) for people to sit on. In the east room there is a throne. The west room holds a large clothes closet decorated with dragon and cloud patterns, and a kang for sitting on. The rear hall holds a large number of ornaments. According to the "Archive of the Ornaments of Yang Xing Dian," the rear hall has total of 724 ornaments. On the left side of the rear hall is Ti Shun Tang (Hall of Swallows' Happiness).
    In 1911 (the third year of Xuantong reign period), the Revolution of 1911 broke out. Empress Dowager Longyu held a "palace meeting" here, at which she decided to abdicate. The words " Yang Xing" come from the Mencius, meaning that the best way to cultivate one's mind is to reduce one's desires. "

    NEXT: Hall of Benevolence (Jingren Palace)

    In Chinese: 养心殿 (Yang Xin Dian)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    19) Hall of Great Supremacy (Taiji Hall)

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012
    Hall of Great Supremacy, Forbidden City
    4 more images

    Hall of Great Supremacy was the only hall that emperor had stayed before during Ming Dynasty. It were many important ceremonies and festivals were held here during Ming Dynasty. It was still a residence for the imperial concubines during Qing Dynasty.

    The signboard was written as:

    " This building was first constructed in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty. After renovation in 1859, it was linked with Chang Chun Gong (Palace of Eternal Spring) and four courtyards were added. Originally it was named Wei Yang Gong (Endless Palace). It was renamed Qi Xiang Gong (Palace of the Auspicious Sign) by Emperor Jiajing of the Ming Dynasty, as his father Prince Xian was born here. It was named Tai Ji Dian in the late Qing Dynasty.
    In 1596 during the Ming Dynasty, Qian Qing Gong (Palace of Heavenly Purity) and Kun Ning Gong (Hall of Earthly Tranquility) were destroyed by fire. Thereafter, Emperor Shenzong (Zhu Yijun) of the Ming Dynasty lived in Tai Ji Dian for more than 10 years. He was the emperor of either the Ming and Qing Dynasty who lived and handled state affairs in this hall. In the Qing Dynasty it was the residence for imperial concubines. Before Emperor Pu Yi, the last emperor of the Qing Dynasty, left the Imperial Palace, Emperor Tongzhi's Concubine Yu lived here. The words "Tai Ji" come from the Book of Changes and mean universe"

    NEXT: Hall of Mental Cultivation (Yangxin Hall)

    In Chinese: 太极殿 (Tai Ji Dian)

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cal6060's Profile Photo

    17) Palace of Blessings to Mother Earth

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 2, 2012
    Palace of Blessings to Mother Earth,Forbidden City
    4 more images

    This imperial palaces were built systematically, but it was still difficult to locate the palace I wanted to visit. They have the same walls around which are red with same heights, and all the gates look very similar. I was using my iphone's compass to direct myself to the right direction, otherwise it is just like a maze. Palace of Blessings to Mother Earth is called " Yi kun Gong" was another residence for the imperial concubines.

    The signboard was written as:

    " Built in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty, it was named Wan An Gong (Palace of Myriad Peace). It was later renamed because of its close proximity to the three palaces of the inner court. "Yi" means "guarding and assisting." It was renovated in 1884 in celebration of Empress Dowager CiXi's 50th birthday and was linked by four courtyards to Chu Xiu Gong (Palace of Gathering Excellence).
    During the Qing Dynasty it was the residence for imperial concubines. When Empress Dowager Cixi lived in Chu Xiu Gong (Palace of Gathering Excellence), the imperial concubines paid their respects by kowtowing to Cu Xi here at important festivals. "

    NEXT: Hall of Great Supremacy (Taiji Hall)

    In Chinese: 翊坤宫 (Yi Kun Gong)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Beijing

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

70 travelers online now

Comments

View all Beijing hotels