Forbidden City - Palace Museum, Beijing

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  • Forbidden City - Palace Museum
    by Willettsworld
  • Forbidden City - Palace Museum
    by Willettsworld
  • Forbidden City - Palace Museum
    by Willettsworld
  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    The Palace Museum

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 8, 2009

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    The collections of the Palace Museum are based on the Qing imperial collection. According to the results of a 1925 audit, some 1.17 million items were stored in the Forbidden City. However, some of these items were shipped to Taiwan when the Japanese invaded in 1933.

    The Palace Museum holds 340,000 pieces of ceramics and porcelain. These include imperial collections from the Tang Dynasty and the Song Dynasty, as well as pieces commissioned by the Palace, and, sometimes, by the Emperor personally. The Palace Museum holds close to 50,000 items of paintings. Of these, more than 400 date from before the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368). This is the largest such collection in China. The Palace Museum's bronze collection dates from the early Shang Dynasty (founded c. 1766 BC). Of the almost 10,000 pieces held, about 1,600 are inscribed items from the pre-Qin period (to 221 BC). The Palace Museum also has one of the largest collections of mechanical timepieces of the 18th and 19th centuries in the world, with more than 1,000 pieces. The collection contains both Chinese- and foreign-made pieces. Chinese pieces came from the palace's own workshops, Guangzhou (Canton) and Suzhou (Suchow). Foreign pieces came from countries including Britain, France, Switzerland, the United States and Japan. You'll have to pay extra to see some of the palace museum collections such as the clocks which are well worth visiting.

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    The Palace Museum

    by Anjin-san Written Sep 12, 2008

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    Lion at Gate of Supreme Harmony
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    The Palace Museum, historically and artistically one of the most comprehensive Chinese museums, was established on the foundation of the palace that was the ritual center of two dynasties, the Ming and the Qing, and their collections of treasures. Designated by the State Council as one of China's foremost protected monuments in 1961, the Palace Museum was also made a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987.

    Situated at the heart of Beijing, the Palace Museum is approached through Tiananmen Gate. Immediately to the north of the Palace Museum is Prospect Hill (also called Coal Hill), while on the east and west are Wangfujing and Zhongnanhai neighborhoods. It is a location endowed with cosmic significance by ancient China's astronomers. Correlating the emperor's abode, which they considered the pivot of the terrestrial world, with the Pole Star (Ziweiyuan), which they believed to be at the center of the heavens, they called the palace The Purple Forbidden City. The Forbidden City was built from 1406 to 1420 by the third Ming emperor Yongle who, upon usurping the throne, determined to move his capital north from Nanjing to Beijing. In 1911 the Qing dynasty fell to the republican revolutionaries. The last emperor, Puyi, continued to live in the palace after his abdication until he was expelled in 1924. Twenty-four emperors lived and ruled from this palace during this 500-year span.

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  • y_lyn's Profile Photo

    The Palace Museum

    by y_lyn Updated Jun 18, 2007

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    This magnificient palace was once the home to a long line of emperors. It was located right at the core of Beijing which is believed to have the best fengshui in Beijing City. Now, the Purple Forbidden City (Now no longer "forbidden" to commoners like us) is known as the Palace Museum. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987.

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  • bsfreeloader's Profile Photo

    Now Called the Palace Museum

    by bsfreeloader Written May 23, 2007

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    Hoping to leave China on a positive note, I intentionally saved my visit to the Palace Museum (formerly known as the Forbidden City) until the very end. Unfortunately, like China in general, the Forbidden City was rather disappointing. The architecture was so similar to that of similar buildings of the time to be unremarkable, two of the main buildings were undergoing major restoration work (the Gate of Supreme Harmony and the Hall of Supreme Harmony), the place was heaving with pushy and inconsiderate tourists, and the touristy nature of the entire thing made it all seem a bit tacky. Since most of the tourists were traveling with guides, it was possible to escape the masses. And some of the permanent exhibits are definitely worth seeing. But I’d hardly rank a visit to the Forbidden City as a lifetime “must-do.” If you decide to visit, be prepared to shell out Y60 for an entrance ticket and another Y40 if you want the automatic audio-tour (the tour provides perhaps 15 to 20 percent more information than what can be found on the signs).

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  • limledi's Profile Photo

    Palace Museum

    by limledi Updated Jan 4, 2007
    Palace Museum

    The Forbidden City was the Chinese imperial palace during the mid-Ming and the Qing Dynasties. The Forbidden City is located in the middle of Beijing, China. It is now known as the Palace Museum.
    The Forbidden City is listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world. The Forbidden City was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987 as the "Imperial Palace of the Ming and Qing Dynasties."

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  • savitha's Profile Photo

    Forbidden City@Palace Museum

    by savitha Updated Jul 9, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palace Museum

    The Forbidden City, called Gu Gong, in chinese was the imperial palace furing the Ming and Qing dynasties.

    It is now known as the Palace Museum and is on the North of Tianenmen Square.
    This is the world's largest palace and covers an area of 74 heactares.

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  • xiquinho's Profile Photo

    Forbidden City

    by xiquinho Updated Sep 11, 2004

    The Palace Museum, historically and artistically one of the most comprehensive Chinese museums, was established on the foundation of the palace that was the ritual center of two dynasties, the Ming and the Qing, and their collections of treasures. Designated by the State Council as one of China's foremost protected monuments in 1961, the Palace Museum was also made a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987.

    Situated at the heart of Beijing, the Palace Museum is approached through Tiananmen Gate. Immediately to the north of the Palace Museum is Prospect Hill (also called Coal Hill), while on the east and west are Wangfujing and Zhongnanhai neighborhoods. It is a location endowed with cosmic significance by ancient China's astronomers. Correlating the emperor's abode, which they considered the pivot of the terrestrial world, with the Pole Star (Ziweiyuan), which they believed to be at the center of the heavens, they called the palace The Purple Forbidden City. The Forbidden City was built from 1406 to 1420 by the third Ming emperor Yongle who, upon usurping the throne, determined to move his capital north from Nanjing to Beijing. In 1911 the Qing dynasty fell to the republican revolutionaries. The last emperor, Puyi, continued to live in the palace after his abdication until he was expelled in 1924. Twenty-four emperors lived and ruled from this palace during this 500-year span.

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  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Palace Museum - Forbidden City

    by magor65 Written Jul 21, 2004

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    Palace Museum - Forbidden City

    While walking around Forbidden City I tried to imagine the life of an emperor, surrounded by his eunuchs. The names of palaces and other buildings suggest contemplation and peacefulness. Palace of Highest Harmony, Gate of Heavenly Purity, Palace of Peaceful Longevity are just a few examples. But in fact the court life was full of intrigues, fear and even murders. The emperor had jade seals with names of his concubines. If he displayed one of the seals the eunuch on duty had to bring the concubine immediately. She was brought naked ( to prove that she had no weapons) in a rolled carpet.

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  • kdoc13's Profile Photo

    The Palace Museum Complex

    by kdoc13 Written May 12, 2004

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    One of the many throne rooms in the Forbidden City

    The Forbidden City is everything you imagine it to be. It is a palace the likes of which you have never dreamed of, a garden which is so different from anything you could imagine, and a story tragic enough to be legend.

    The forbidden city was the traditional hoe of the emperors of China. You can visit the web page for all of the information. Just know it was built in 1420 and was extravagant still, when I saw it in 2001. City is a correct term for it, because there are so many buildings, it could take you weeks to go through each one.

    The best way to get there is to sign up for a tour through your hotel.

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  • antoine2000's Profile Photo

    The Palace Museum

    by antoine2000 Written Sep 23, 2003

    This is a vast space of temples, buildings and marble. An awesom place to visit.

    Take the 'audio' tour which is provided by Roger Moore - we couldn't giggling at first when we heard his voice, but it's cool!

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  • Scottyj36's Profile Photo

    Forbidden City/Palace Museum

    by Scottyj36 Written Feb 13, 2003
    Gate of Supreme Harmony

    This is a large place with over 800 rooms. Not all rooms are open to the public. This is where most of China's treasures were kept , and where the emporer lived. There is a guided tour by "James Bond" Rodger Moore narrates with a little set you can rent when you enter the Forbidden city. There are several palace rooms with throns that the emporer sat in. Lots of gold.

    Admission is 60RMB and the hours are 8:30am-5:00pm summer and 8:30am-4:30pm winter.

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  • tuff's Profile Photo

    Palace museum

    by tuff Written Jan 24, 2008

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    It's not forbidden anymore. This is the former palace turned into museum, it's a huge complex with incredible architecture and landscape. Just look at the details in the buildings.

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