Jingshan Park, Beijing

4.5 out of 5 stars 37 Reviews

44 Jingshanxi Street, Xicheng 010-64038098

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    Jingshan park
    by loja
  • Jingshan park
    Jingshan park
    by loja
  • Jingshan park
    Jingshan park
    by loja
  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Hanging Tree of Last Ming Emperor

    by SLLiew Written Sep 23, 2008

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    Location: Near the East Entrance of Jinshang Park.

    According to history, when the Manchus defeated the Ming Dynasty to set up the Qing Dynasty, the last Ming Emperor first killed all the members of his family and then hung himself on a tree at this site.

    The original tree has been chopped down. According to the tour guide, many trees were planted at the same site but failed to grow. Finally, the present tree was planted and a plaque placed to remember this spot. You can see many Chinese tourists taking photos here.

    The last Qing Dynasty by the way was Emperor Pu Yi who after "rehabiliation", worked in the Botanical Gardens until his passing away.

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    JINGSHAN PARK & BEIHAI PARK

    by ancient_traveler Written Mar 11, 2008

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    JINGSHAN PARK (Coal Hill).
    The pavilion of Everlasting Spring perched on top of the 43 meters high. Coal Hill was once the highest point in Beijing, and now offers the best view of the golden roofs of the Imperial Palace. On its eastern slope there once stood an old tree which Chongzhen, the last Ming emperor, is supposed to have hanged himself in 1644 when Li Zicheng’s peasant army stormed into Beijing.

    BEIHAI PARK
    Beihai (North Sea) built in the Jin Dynasty. During the Jin, Yuan, Ming, and Qing times, it was an imperial garden. More than half of which is occupied by waters. The famous beautiful hill in the middle of water called the Jade Flowery Islet and White Dagoba located at the park’s center was built in the style of fairy mountain believed in ancient times to exist somewhere in the East Sea.

    Jingshan park Forbidden City from Jingshan park, 1999 Beihai park White Dagoba
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    View of the Forbidden City

    by tuff Written Jan 24, 2008

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    Directly north of the Forbidden City is Jinshang Park, this is where the last emperor of the Ming Dynasty hung himself as the Qing soldiers moved into the Forbidden City. It has a nice view of the Forbidden City from the top of the hill.

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    Jingshan Park

    by sunnywong Written Feb 5, 2007

    Opposite the northern gate of the Palace Museum is Jingshan (hill of commanding views) Park. Covering a space of 23 hectares, this park was once an imperial garden during the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368-1911) and was open to the public now. The Jingshan Hill, situated on the meridian line of the city of Beijing, Provides a panoramic view of the capital.

    Jingshan Park

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  • Jingshan Park - Part II

    by mke1963 Written Apr 30, 2006

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    The huge hall opposite the southern entrance (or Jingshan Men) is the beautifully proportioned but curiously inappropriately named Qiwang Lou or Beautiful View Tower; the name is inappropriate because it has the worst view of every single structure in the entire park. The building is worth admiring, even though the municipal parks people insist on putting tubs of palms on the terrace and front and they have now erected a huge 'information hoarding' in front of it. The crass ignorance of the people responsible for China's architectural heritage never ceases to amaze me.
    Don't forget to head round to the east of the hill where a memorial stone commemorates the last of the Ming emperors hanged himself from a tree; the tree was considered an accomplice to this heinous crime and was for a long time manacled. Odd but true.

    In April, the gardens are full of peonies and this is one of the three best places in China to see mass displays of China's national flower: the other two are the Beijing Botanical Gardens out at Xiangshan and in Luoyang in Henan Province, the home of peonies.

    The local community is particularly active in Jingshan Park, and many corners are busy with people dancing, playing instruments and just getting together to sing. Others prefer to play chess or mahjong, while others are content to roam around on the grass, one of the few parks in China which seems unbothered by citizens sitting on the hallowed green stuff.

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  • Jingshan Park - Part I

    by mke1963 Written Apr 30, 2006

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    The only ground rising more than about a metre from Beijing's flat landscape, Jingshan has an odd history, but remains one of the best plaves to see the Forbidden City, despite current major renovation works that have closed all the hillside and hilltop pavilions. Any other city on the plant would close and renovate them one at a time, but this is Beijing and the authorities don't generally used joined-up thinking when tackling anything these days. As long as the whole place looks good for the Olympics mediafest, locals and current visitors don't count for much.
    The Mei Shan Tan Hai as the area was originally known is always rather tranquil, despite its proximity to the Forbidden City which lies immediately to the south. During the Liao Dynasty, large quantities of coal and charcoal were stored here for use if the supplies ran out or the city was besieged. The coal was stored on the ground in large piles, and the charcoal in a huge pit nearby - hence the name Mei Shan Tan Hai (Coal Hill, Charcoal Sea). Soil from the nearby lakes covered the coal and a mountain grew to protect the Imperial City from nasty spirits coming from the north.
    In the Ming Dynasty it was referred to as Ten Thousand Year Hill and then later, in the Qing, as Prospect Hill (Jingshan) which has stuck, although locals still call it Mei Shan or Coal Hill.
    The five hillside pavilions were built in 1758 by Qianlong, and although the guidebooks all start their tours in the south gate, opposite the north gate of the Forbidden City, the best way to visit it is surely by climbing from the back of the hill to allow the full spectacle of the golden roofs of the Forbidden City to suddenly appear through the pines and junipers on the slopes. Climbing up to the summit of the hill, the five pavilions each provide a wonderful view out over the Forbidden City, with the absolute peak being the Hall of Ten Thousand Springs - given that it's at the top of the hill, it's as curious a name as the 'Beautiful View Tower' at the bottom.

    The Forbidden City rooftops Peonies and pine The Beautiful View Tower - without a view Chinese lace-bark pine Music and dance among the peonies

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  • bonio's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by bonio Written Dec 24, 2005

    Just to the North ot the Forbidden City, Interesting stop off on the way back to the bus to see the tree where the last Ming Emporer, Chong Zhen, hung himself when he realised that the dynasty was over.

    That's the tree.

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  • indigo_sf's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by indigo_sf Updated Oct 30, 2005

    This park is located just opposite the north entrance gate of forbidden city.
    This is a remarkable place full of conscientious gardens and historic buildings.
    Also offers a great view of forbidden city from high.

    We also spoted some people doing a painting on the ground technique using a strange paint from oil or something like this.

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  • MickeH's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by MickeH Written Sep 5, 2005

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    This park offers the best view of the Forbidden City that you can possibly find.
    The hill was acctually built from the earth that was removed when they dug out the moat for the palace.
    But the view is not limited to the palace, you get a superb panorama over the whole city once you've climbed your way to the top.

    On the east side of the hill you can find the locust tree where the last of the Ming emperors hung himself when the city was overrun by rebels.

    And below the hill there are a small garden with benches to relax weary feet and maby write a postcard or two.

    At the entrance, looking up
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    • Architecture

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  • tyusen's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by tyusen Written Aug 8, 2005

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    Jingshan Park itself is worth visiting, but the most important purpose to visit here is to see the dynamic view of the Forbidden City. If the weather is pretty good, you should go to the park in the evening. You will be able to see beautiful and glorious landscape of the Forbidden City.

    A view from Jingshan Park
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    The Coal Hill Park

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 11, 2005

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    The Coal Hill Park lies right to the north of the Forbidden City, formerly a private garden for the Imperial Family. Since coal was heaped out of the foot of the hill it was always known as Coal Hill.

    The Coal Hill Park
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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Coal Hill

    by filipdebont Written Jan 22, 2005

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    The Coal Hill or with its modern name Prospect Hill park (Jingshan Gongyuan).

    This hill is located on the northern side of the Forbidden City.

    It is wise to start your visit here; from the top of this Coal Hill you have splendid view over the Forbidden City. (A tip from a friend who visited Beijing a few years ago). Unfortunately I did not have enough time to climb this hill.

    Coal Hill seen from the Forbidden City
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

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  • pmarshuk's Profile Photo

    Coal Hill

    by pmarshuk Written May 15, 2003

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    Directly to the northof the Forbidden City is Coal HillOn its eastern slope the last Ming emperor reputedly hung himself in 1644. This picture was taken just outside The Gate of Divine Prowess (Shenwumen)

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  • Prospect Hill Park - Jing3 shan1 Gong1 yuan2

    by GongXiFaCai Written Apr 6, 2003

    This is an interesting park located right north of the Forbidden City. Here you must have a camera to photograph Beijing city as well as the Forbidden City roopftops. If you walk down to the eastern end of the park there is a famous locust tree where the last of the Ming emperors, ChongZhen, hung himself as the city was overtaken by rebels. The admission fee to the park is Y2 and it is open from 6:00 to 21:30 every day!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • josieling's Profile Photo

    Evnjoy Chinese people

    by josieling Written Apr 4, 2003

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    People make up cities, so it's great to get a closer look at the everyday lives of Beijingers. My favourite place is Jingshan Park. (Tiantan park is also a good place.) Go early in the morning or in the evening.

    You will find older people dancing ballroom dances, writing caligraphy on the pavement, playing very energetic games, etc

    The older people are agile beyond belief!

    *** Don't forget to go to the top of Jingshan Hill which offers a splendid view of the Forbidden City and Beijing,

    Writing giant caligraphy

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