Jingshan Park, Beijing

4.5 out of 5 stars 37 Reviews

44 Jingshanxi Street, Xicheng 010-64038098

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  • Jingshan park
    Jingshan park
    by loja
  • Jingshan park
    Jingshan park
    by loja
  • Jingshan park, dancing people
    Jingshan park, dancing people
    by loja
  • lindyz's Profile Photo

    Dress-ups in Imperial Costume

    by lindyz Written Oct 1, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was the first place we saw this, and it ended up being the cheapest place also! We saw many dress-up places on our trip, but this one was by far the cheapest, costing only 15rmb each = about $3AUD to dress up and take pictures with YOUR camera. The others we saw ranged from 30rmb-50rmb. These are great value for money shots. We were thinking we would only get to take one each individual and then maybe have to pay another 15rmb to get a photo taken together, but the lady there took about 10 shots of us together, at no extra fee.

    It was very very hot this day and I remember the costume being so heavy and hot, I couldnt wait to take it off. Also, the thing on your head is wooden and quite heavy, and I tried to wave a fly away and the thing nearly fell of my head - funny!

    I think you really have to do this - its cheap and they are great fun shots. Although I really would like to know what the chinese sign says above our heads - does it say "you look like idiots!" or does it say "sucked in, we ripped you off!"???

    Imperial women! Great shots Crooked! The sneakers dont really compliment the outfit! Good memories

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    Jingshan Park

    by lindyz Written Oct 1, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you come out of the North Gate of Forbidden City, you just have to use the tunnel under the road and you are at the main entrance to Jingshan Park, at the South Gate. Entrance to the park is a whole 2rmb = about .30cAUD.

    This park is beautiful, I saw the greenest grass here I have ever seen in my life. The highlight here is climbing the many steps up to the highest Pavillion, which is the Wanchun Pavillion, and from here you will get the most amazing spectactular panoramic views over the whole of Beijing. The day we were here, the skies were very clear and we could see for miles and miles.

    The Chinese People just love to relax, chill and exercise in their Parks. Here, we found people dancing to a Jennifer Lopez song, playing foot hockey and just generally relaxing. Chinese Parks are a great place to sit down and just watch the world go by - that is one of my favourite holiday things to do - just people-watch.

    View from the top of Wanchun Pavillion The greenest lawn Ive ever seen View to Behai Park and the White Dagoba View from top Pavillion to the North People dancing to Jennifer Lopez!

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    Jingshan Park - after Forbidden City tour!

    by Penelope4 Written Jul 1, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I actually wanted to rest after that exhausting tour of the Forbidden City. It was a lovely day so I was not surprised to see locals sitting on all of the benches. I kept walking hoping that I could find my own little place for a nap. However, I forgot about my plan when I heard opera singers practising some good piece. Chinese landscape is breathtaking! And then I saw people playing some games and a group of people gathered in a big crowd. There was an entertaining performance even at 3 pm on a hot summer day! I joined the locals for some time and then I headed off to one of the pavilions and did I enjoy the great views!!!

    Jingshan Park was known as Wansuishan until 1655. Jingshan means scenic hills. It is about 23 hectares and has a height of 43-meters. It has several thousands of trees such as peonies, pine trees and other ancient trees. It is worth climbing the stairs as it leads to pavilions built in the reign of Qing Emperor Qianlong. They are called Wonderful View Pavilion, Surrounding View Pavilion, Ten Thousand Springs Pavilion (is on the summit and offers the best view) and Harmonious Fragrance Pavilion. What a great place to be in! Birds are singing everywhere, fresh air, happy people having a good time - I love it!

    Ticket costs 2 RMB only.

    A breathtaking view from one of the pavilions The past and the present architecture That's the summit of all pavilions. Let's climb it A couple having a nap. Cute eh?

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Jinshan Park

    by SLLiew Written Sep 23, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located across the street of the north exit of the Forbidden City, Jinshan Park has a quiet cypress garden and an artificial hill with a Buddhist temple at the top overlooking the Forbidden City.

    If you have a choice, pick a clear day and you can see the wonderful panaromic view of all directions of Beijing - Forbidden City and National Theatre of Performing Art in the south, the Drum and Bell Tower in the north, the CCTV building in the new Central Business District in the East and the Bei Hai Park in the west.

    You can climb up the steps to the top of the hill from all 4 directions. At the top, it is crowded with many tourists and photographers. Worth the climb.

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    Hanging Tree of Last Ming Emperor

    by SLLiew Written Sep 23, 2008

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    Location: Near the East Entrance of Jinshang Park.

    According to history, when the Manchus defeated the Ming Dynasty to set up the Qing Dynasty, the last Ming Emperor first killed all the members of his family and then hung himself on a tree at this site.

    The original tree has been chopped down. According to the tour guide, many trees were planted at the same site but failed to grow. Finally, the present tree was planted and a plaque placed to remember this spot. You can see many Chinese tourists taking photos here.

    The last Qing Dynasty by the way was Emperor Pu Yi who after "rehabiliation", worked in the Botanical Gardens until his passing away.

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  • nepalgoods's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by nepalgoods Updated Dec 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    North of the Forbidden City is Jingshang Park. From the Pavillon of Eternal Peace you have a wonderful view over the Palace. This Park had been an Imperial Garden during Ming and Qing Dynasty. Later people used to store coal there. That is why this park is also called Coal Hill.

    One famous incident took place here in 1644, when Emperor Chongzhen killed himself being afraid of some rebells.

    This is a very good place to watch people doing their Tai Ji exercise or dance or dooing something else for their health.

    Jingshan Park from the Palace
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • MickeH's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by MickeH Written Sep 5, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This park offers the best view of the Forbidden City that you can possibly find.
    The hill was acctually built from the earth that was removed when they dug out the moat for the palace.
    But the view is not limited to the palace, you get a superb panorama over the whole city once you've climbed your way to the top.

    On the east side of the hill you can find the locust tree where the last of the Ming emperors hung himself when the city was overrun by rebels.

    And below the hill there are a small garden with benches to relax weary feet and maby write a postcard or two.

    At the entrance, looking up
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park by night

    by blueskyjohn Updated Oct 13, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jingshan Park is directly north of Forbidden Palace. Most people visit the park in early mornings and day time. However, i recommend taking some time to visit the park in the evening as well. A lot less crowds and a peaceful night walk. The city is beautifully lit, especially forbidden city and the Lama stupa at Bei Hai park. While you not see any of the gardens very well, you have the benefit of the features lit up and makes for a very nice setting.

    Entry to the park is 2rmb. November through March, the park hours are 6:30am to 8:00pm. From April through October is 6:00am to 9:00pm.

    Forbidden City Bei Hai Park in the background
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Coal Hill

    by filipdebont Written Jan 22, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Coal Hill or with its modern name Prospect Hill park (Jingshan Gongyuan).

    This hill is located on the northern side of the Forbidden City.

    It is wise to start your visit here; from the top of this Coal Hill you have splendid view over the Forbidden City. (A tip from a friend who visited Beijing a few years ago). Unfortunately I did not have enough time to climb this hill.

    Coal Hill seen from the Forbidden City
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

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  • josieling's Profile Photo

    Evnjoy Chinese people

    by josieling Written Apr 4, 2003

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    People make up cities, so it's great to get a closer look at the everyday lives of Beijingers. My favourite place is Jingshan Park. (Tiantan park is also a good place.) Go early in the morning or in the evening.

    You will find older people dancing ballroom dances, writing caligraphy on the pavement, playing very energetic games, etc

    The older people are agile beyond belief!

    *** Don't forget to go to the top of Jingshan Hill which offers a splendid view of the Forbidden City and Beijing,

    Writing giant caligraphy

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  • extrajoce's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park - at sunset

    by extrajoce Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Seeing that the sun was coming down quickly, I ran up the hill of Jingshan Park and caught a beautiful view of: Forbidden City with golden roofs to the south, temples to the north, and this one of the West of Beijing with hills in the distance. Quite a spectacle!

    West Beijing at sunset
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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  • Jingshan Park - Part I

    by mke1963 Written Apr 30, 2006

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    The only ground rising more than about a metre from Beijing's flat landscape, Jingshan has an odd history, but remains one of the best plaves to see the Forbidden City, despite current major renovation works that have closed all the hillside and hilltop pavilions. Any other city on the plant would close and renovate them one at a time, but this is Beijing and the authorities don't generally used joined-up thinking when tackling anything these days. As long as the whole place looks good for the Olympics mediafest, locals and current visitors don't count for much.
    The Mei Shan Tan Hai as the area was originally known is always rather tranquil, despite its proximity to the Forbidden City which lies immediately to the south. During the Liao Dynasty, large quantities of coal and charcoal were stored here for use if the supplies ran out or the city was besieged. The coal was stored on the ground in large piles, and the charcoal in a huge pit nearby - hence the name Mei Shan Tan Hai (Coal Hill, Charcoal Sea). Soil from the nearby lakes covered the coal and a mountain grew to protect the Imperial City from nasty spirits coming from the north.
    In the Ming Dynasty it was referred to as Ten Thousand Year Hill and then later, in the Qing, as Prospect Hill (Jingshan) which has stuck, although locals still call it Mei Shan or Coal Hill.
    The five hillside pavilions were built in 1758 by Qianlong, and although the guidebooks all start their tours in the south gate, opposite the north gate of the Forbidden City, the best way to visit it is surely by climbing from the back of the hill to allow the full spectacle of the golden roofs of the Forbidden City to suddenly appear through the pines and junipers on the slopes. Climbing up to the summit of the hill, the five pavilions each provide a wonderful view out over the Forbidden City, with the absolute peak being the Hall of Ten Thousand Springs - given that it's at the top of the hill, it's as curious a name as the 'Beautiful View Tower' at the bottom.

    The Forbidden City rooftops Peonies and pine The Beautiful View Tower - without a view Chinese lace-bark pine Music and dance among the peonies

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Jingshan Park

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The park consist of a large hill just north of the Forbidden City. The park gives great views of the Forbidden City, Behai Park and Beijing in general.

    The earlier picture overlooking the fordidden city was taken from here

    Jingshan Park Jingshan Park Jingshan Park
    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • JohanIsWeg's Profile Photo

    Water calligraphy

    by JohanIsWeg Updated Jul 9, 2009

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    Water calligraphy has grown in popularity as a branch of more traditional calligraphy over the last 12 years. This is possibly as a result of its popularity among tourists and also provides an opportunity for the elderly practitioners to exercise and socialise.
    Artists dip long-handled brushes in water and produce delicately sculpted writing on pavers. These remain for a short while and then slowly evaporate, leaving a blank canvas for the next thought or expression.
    Jingshan Park is an excellent destination to stand enthralled by these septuagenarian artists and their ilk.
    Open from 0600 to 1900.

    Water calligraphy in Jingshan Park
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • pmarshuk's Profile Photo

    Coal Hill

    by pmarshuk Written May 15, 2003

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    Directly to the northof the Forbidden City is Coal HillOn its eastern slope the last Ming emperor reputedly hung himself in 1644. This picture was taken just outside The Gate of Divine Prowess (Shenwumen)

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