Ming Tombs, Beijing

3.5 out of 5 stars 3.5 Stars - 69 Reviews

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  • Ming Tombs
    by machomikemd
  • Ming Tombs
    by machomikemd
  • Ming Tombs
    by machomikemd
  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    4Camino Sagrado/Sacred Path-Estela/Stele

    by elpariente Updated Mar 21, 2008

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    En el pabellón de la estela hay una estela del emperador Yongle de 9 metros de altura en la que se describe la construcción de las trece tumbas .
    La estela está sobre un animal que tiene cuerpo de tortuga y cabeza de dragón que se llama "Bixi"
    Dicen que da buena suerte tocarle la cabeza


    In the pavilion there is an Stelle of Emperor Yongle of 9 meters on which describes the construction of the thirteen tombs.
    The stele is on an animal that has turtle body and dragon head and is is called "Bixi"
    They say that is a good luck sign to touch his head

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    1 El camino sagrado / The Sacred Path

    by elpariente Updated Mar 21, 2008

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    Las Tumbas Ming, llamadas en chino "las Trece Tumbas", ocupan todo un valle, ya que según las reglas del fengshui (geomancia china) deberían de construirse entre un río y una montaña
    El Camino Sagrado que nos lleva hasta las tumbas Ming , tiene más de siete kilómetros de largo , aunque los más interesantes son los primeros 700 metros que empiezan en la Gran Puerta Roja , de tres arcos y que el emperador era el único que podía cruzar por el central .
    A partir de aquí en una avenida flanqueada por sauces llorones , se encuentran 12 pares de esculturas de animales reales y míticos, realizadas en mármol en el siglo XVI, así como 6 pares de esculturas de funcionarios, militares, civiles y letrados, que finalizan en la Puerta del Dragón y el Fénix

    The Ming Tombs , called in Chinese " The Thirteen Tombs", are located in a valley , because according the the "fengshui" rules ( Chinese geomantics ) they should be built between a river and a mountain
    The Sacred Way, which leads to the Ming tombs, has more than seven kilometers long, but the most interesting part are the first 700 meters , starting at the Great Red Door , with three arches and the Emperor was the only one who could cross the central arch .
    From here on a main road flanked by weeping willows, there are 12 pairs of sculptures of animals real and mythical, marble-made in the sixteenth century, as well as 6 pairs of sculptures of officials, militars and civilian lawyers, who finished in the Dragon and Phoenix Gate

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    2 Camino Sagrado/Sacred Path Animales/Animals

    by elpariente Written Mar 21, 2008

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    Xiezhi
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    Los 12 pares de esculturas de animales reales y míticos se distribuyen a ambos lados del camino dos en actitud de estar en acción , de pie y dos en estado de reposo , postradas/tumbadas .
    Los animales protegerán a los emperadores en el otro mundo
    Animales reales :
    - León
    - Elefante
    - Camello
    - Caballo
    Animales míticos :
    - Xiezhi : Es una cabra divina que después de ver una pelea alza su cuerno para tocar al malo y es tan justo que no se desvía de sus principios ni ante el emperador
    - Quilin : tiene cuerpo de león, piel de pez y cuernos de ciervo y es un buen presagio que trae prosperidad



    The 12 pairs of sculptures of real and mythical animals are distributed on both sides of the road two in attitude to be in action, standing and two in resting position , crouch or prone .
    This animals protect the emperors in the other world
    Real Animals :
    -- Lion
    -- Elephant
    -- Camel
    -- Horse
    Mythical Animals :
    -- Xiezhi : It is a divine goat that after seeing a fight hike his horn to touch the bad and it is so fair that does not deviate from their principles even in front of the emperor
    -- Quilin: It has body lion, fish skin and horns of deer and is a good omen that brings prosperity

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  • Ming Tombs

    by loliver Written Dec 23, 2007

    Probably something that could be skipped unless you were absolutely into the Ming Dynasties. Beautiful area and plenty of information in multiple languages, but definitely not as awe inspiring as other things in Beijing.

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    Ming Tombs

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Dec 18, 2007
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    Some Emperors of the Ming Dynasty are buried here. I wanted to walk on the Spirit Way statues but the tour guide didn't take us there =(
    We were taken to a Museum and the Soul Tower. Honestly I didn't find this place very exciting, but at least I could take a rest after walking the Great Wall.

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  • rosie235's Profile Photo

    too many to visit ..

    by rosie235 Written Jul 20, 2007

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    We decided to visit the Tomb of the 3rd Emperor. He was the first emperor to be buried here. His tomb is the biggest of them all. He was buried here with his wife and his 16 concubines. 13 of the 16 Ming Emperors were buried here. Many of the tombs were closed for renovation prior to the Olympics so it is best to find out which are open prior to heading out this way.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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    Ming's tomb

    by Chip_Master Written Jul 9, 2007

    I'd give this one a B. If you have the time its probably worth a visit. If you are short then Forbidden City, Greatwall, Temple of Heaven and a half day walk around dowtown are much more rewarding. Sure its the toombs of emerors but all you see is a big hole in the ground and some replica displays. But we had the time and came and saw.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    13 Ming Tombs

    by kenyneo Written Jun 14, 2007
    Who is he ? Must be the Emperor Yongle ....I think

    We have been conned . There are 13 of them all together , some excavated , some not escavated...so know which one to go to ...haha...but even the one which was not excavated ..we managed to see some imperial stuff ...otherwise it is a waste of time ..was rushing do didnt actually visit the Spirit Way ( a road filled with stone statues on both sides )

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Stargazer1's Profile Photo

    Ming Tombs

    by Stargazer1 Updated May 11, 2007

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    Ming Tombs, near Beijing

    The Ming Tombs are a major tourist stop. It's very important to Chinese history. They are 50 km (31 miles) NW of the urban Beijing area, in Changping County. There are 13 mausoleums for 13 emperors. However, I believe you can visit only three. Still well worth a visit. Lots of gardens and scenery in between, and nice views.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    On the way between the 2 Great Wall of China

    by shamenc Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    We did the Ming Tombs in between the Mutainyu and BaDaLing.

    When we got there, the environment around the tomb is quite beautiful... and kind of peaceful.

    Unfortunately, i'm not a very history/tombs person.. so i was not very excited about the whole thing. But i must say it's quite impressive for a tomb like that to be built..

    Be prepared that when you walk all the way down to the Emperor's Tomb.. all you see is the throne and coffin.. AND THAT'S IT!!!

    If you are really short of time.. ie your trip is a 2day thing.. then i think you can give this a miss...

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    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • limledi's Profile Photo

    Ming's Tomb

    by limledi Updated Dec 30, 2006

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    Ming's Tomb
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    Ming Tombs are generally combined with a visit to the Great Wall. Otherwise known as the “13 Tombs”, this is the burial site of 13 out of 17 emperors of the Ming Dynasty. However, the only one you can get a good look at is the tomb of Emperor Wanli, who reigned from 1537 to 1620. This tomb was unearthed in 1956. There are two others that have been uncovered, but the rest remain illusive.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • JBourne's Profile Photo

    Two Ming tombs

    by JBourne Updated Nov 26, 2006

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    Tree lined courtyard in front of the Soul Tower
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    There are 13 tombs but only two were open when we went, Changling and Dingling. Others had apparently flooded, or had never been repaired. The above ground buildings were generally made of wood and therefore have rotted away. Changling was renovated and mainly rebuilt 50 years ago.

    The setting is about an hour's drive from the Wangfuging Road and we went by private car with a driver. The area is rural and beautiful, with tree lined roads and crop fields behind. There are mountains surrounding and according to our guide the emperors employed priests/spiritualists to search for the perfect area which balanced Feng Shui.

    A lot of time, effort and money went into building these tombs. Logs were brought in from a great distance away for one of the main buildings. It took years to float the enormous logs downstream and costs many lives. These logs (of the Nanmu tree - famed in China for its unmatchable beauty) now make up columns that support the roof of the sacrificial chamber at Changling.

    The tombs have an imperial road (spirit way) approaching them and a main hall for worship. Some have smaller buildings surrounding which house statues or pyres for burning tributes, and the burial chambers themselves are underground.

    A piece of priceless Chinese treasure is housed here - the imperial golden crown. This is very beautiful and there are many other unearthed archaeological finds exhibited such as swords, pots and jewellery.

    The architecture is very much like the forbidden city - the vermillion walls and yellow roof tiles were reserved for imperial use only - but the tombs, in my opinion, are in a more beautiful setting.

    NB - the only toilets are holes in the ground, and they aren't pretty.
    There are plenty of water sellers too, and trinkets.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • msonia's Profile Photo

    Ming Tombs: which one?

    by msonia Updated Aug 28, 2006

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    Anyone who plan to take a tour to Ming Tombs and Great Wall, please ask the tour leader or make sure that he/she will take you to the building as shown on the brochure.

    We were trully ripped-off by the tour leader who took us to a different building. He didn't take us to the building where the tombs really are or the gate with lion statues along the way.

    CTS (China Travel Service Head Office) was really disappointed us. We travelled from the other side of the globe to see Ming Tombs, and look what we visited: only a museum.

    We travelled to several cities in Asia countries prior visited China. This tour was the worse tour we ever had.

    CTS = Certainly and Trully Suck.

    The Parker.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Ming Tombs - wonderful approach

    by SLLiew Written Aug 16, 2006

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    I am impressed by the statues of animals and mythical animals leading to the Ming Tombs. However, it is disappointing that most tombs are empty.

    Nonetheless, it a trip worth the while. Usually it is part of a stop-over along the way to the Great Wall of China. And so great to stretch the legs if the weather is fine.

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    Dingling

    by cheezecake_deli Written Mar 23, 2006

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    Soul Tower @ Dingling

    Two of the Ming Tombs (or Ming Shisan Ling) northwest of Beijing have been excavated and are open to visitors: Dingling and Changling. Dingling is the underground mausoleum of the Emperor Wanli and his two empresses. The grounds are pleasant enough for a stroll, and there is a small museum of the excavation of the site. The underground vault itself is large, though a bit eerie.

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    • Budget Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

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