Ming Tombs, Beijing

3.5 out of 5 stars 80 Reviews

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  • Ming Tombs
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  • Ming Tombs
    by machomikemd
  • Ming Tombs
    by machomikemd
  • Chip_Master's Profile Photo

    Ming's tomb

    by Chip_Master Written Jul 9, 2007

    I'd give this one a B. If you have the time its probably worth a visit. If you are short then Forbidden City, Greatwall, Temple of Heaven and a half day walk around dowtown are much more rewarding. Sure its the toombs of emerors but all you see is a big hole in the ground and some replica displays. But we had the time and came and saw.

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    13 Ming Tombs

    by kenyneo Written Jun 14, 2007

    We have been conned . There are 13 of them all together , some excavated , some not escavated...so know which one to go to ...haha...but even the one which was not excavated ..we managed to see some imperial stuff ...otherwise it is a waste of time ..was rushing do didnt actually visit the Spirit Way ( a road filled with stone statues on both sides )

    Who is he ? Must be the Emperor Yongle ....I think
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    Ming Tombs

    by Stargazer1 Updated May 11, 2007

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    The Ming Tombs are a major tourist stop. It's very important to Chinese history. They are 50 km (31 miles) NW of the urban Beijing area, in Changping County. There are 13 mausoleums for 13 emperors. However, I believe you can visit only three. Still well worth a visit. Lots of gardens and scenery in between, and nice views.

    Ming Tombs, near Beijing
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    On the way between the 2 Great Wall of China

    by shamenc Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    We did the Ming Tombs in between the Mutainyu and BaDaLing.

    When we got there, the environment around the tomb is quite beautiful... and kind of peaceful.

    Unfortunately, i'm not a very history/tombs person.. so i was not very excited about the whole thing. But i must say it's quite impressive for a tomb like that to be built..

    Be prepared that when you walk all the way down to the Emperor's Tomb.. all you see is the throne and coffin.. AND THAT'S IT!!!

    If you are really short of time.. ie your trip is a 2day thing.. then i think you can give this a miss...

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    Ming's Tomb

    by limledi Updated Dec 30, 2006

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    Ming Tombs are generally combined with a visit to the Great Wall. Otherwise known as the “13 Tombs”, this is the burial site of 13 out of 17 emperors of the Ming Dynasty. However, the only one you can get a good look at is the tomb of Emperor Wanli, who reigned from 1537 to 1620. This tomb was unearthed in 1956. There are two others that have been uncovered, but the rest remain illusive.

    Ming's Tomb Ming's Tomb Ming's Tomb Ming's Tomb Ming's Tomb
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    Wax Museum

    by limledi Updated Dec 20, 2006

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    We made this trip to a wax museum before going to the Great Wall of China. This wax museum is massive and depicts Chinese history during early times. Very attractive and colourful. You will have an idea of how it is like living in the past. You can see the brutality of Imperial rule.

    Wax Museum Wax Museum Wax Museum Wax Museum Wax Museum
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    Two Ming tombs

    by JBourne Updated Nov 26, 2006

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    There are 13 tombs but only two were open when we went, Changling and Dingling. Others had apparently flooded, or had never been repaired. The above ground buildings were generally made of wood and therefore have rotted away. Changling was renovated and mainly rebuilt 50 years ago.

    The setting is about an hour's drive from the Wangfuging Road and we went by private car with a driver. The area is rural and beautiful, with tree lined roads and crop fields behind. There are mountains surrounding and according to our guide the emperors employed priests/spiritualists to search for the perfect area which balanced Feng Shui.

    A lot of time, effort and money went into building these tombs. Logs were brought in from a great distance away for one of the main buildings. It took years to float the enormous logs downstream and costs many lives. These logs (of the Nanmu tree - famed in China for its unmatchable beauty) now make up columns that support the roof of the sacrificial chamber at Changling.

    The tombs have an imperial road (spirit way) approaching them and a main hall for worship. Some have smaller buildings surrounding which house statues or pyres for burning tributes, and the burial chambers themselves are underground.

    A piece of priceless Chinese treasure is housed here - the imperial golden crown. This is very beautiful and there are many other unearthed archaeological finds exhibited such as swords, pots and jewellery.

    The architecture is very much like the forbidden city - the vermillion walls and yellow roof tiles were reserved for imperial use only - but the tombs, in my opinion, are in a more beautiful setting.

    NB - the only toilets are holes in the ground, and they aren't pretty.
    There are plenty of water sellers too, and trinkets.

    Tree lined courtyard in front of the Soul Tower Ling'en Hall - Sacrificial Chamber Emperor Yongle (who was first to be buried here) Surrounding mountains Building housing the emperors soul
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    Ming Tombs: which one?

    by msonia Updated Aug 28, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anyone who plan to take a tour to Ming Tombs and Great Wall, please ask the tour leader or make sure that he/she will take you to the building as shown on the brochure.

    We were trully ripped-off by the tour leader who took us to a different building. He didn't take us to the building where the tombs really are or the gate with lion statues along the way.

    CTS (China Travel Service Head Office) was really disappointed us. We travelled from the other side of the globe to see Ming Tombs, and look what we visited: only a museum.

    We travelled to several cities in Asia countries prior visited China. This tour was the worse tour we ever had.

    CTS = Certainly and Trully Suck.

    The Parker.

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    Ming Tombs - wonderful approach

    by SLLiew Written Aug 16, 2006

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    I am impressed by the statues of animals and mythical animals leading to the Ming Tombs. However, it is disappointing that most tombs are empty.

    Nonetheless, it a trip worth the while. Usually it is part of a stop-over along the way to the Great Wall of China. And so great to stretch the legs if the weather is fine.

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    Ming Dynasty waxworks museum

    by ghweeh Updated Jun 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A place filled with rich culture, society, customs and history made of wax!

    It reproduced historical scenes and depicting events that happened during the Ming Dynasties with exquisite wax figures. I was most fascinated with the scenes of Admiral Zheng He’s voyage around the “world”. I felt I was part of the voyage as I watched the documentaries in commemoration of the 600th Anniversary of Admiral Zheng He’s voyage. On thoughts perhaps, but in real life, would I be able to endure the rough sea and life away from solid land??? I doubt…

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    Dingling

    by cheezecake_deli Written Mar 23, 2006

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    Two of the Ming Tombs (or Ming Shisan Ling) northwest of Beijing have been excavated and are open to visitors: Dingling and Changling. Dingling is the underground mausoleum of the Emperor Wanli and his two empresses. The grounds are pleasant enough for a stroll, and there is a small museum of the excavation of the site. The underground vault itself is large, though a bit eerie.

    Soul Tower @ Dingling
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    Ming Tombs - Ming Dinasty "Shi san Ling"

    by blue_sky04 Updated Jan 18, 2006

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    The Ming Tombs are located in Changping County, about fifty km northwest of Beijing. The tombs, covering a hilly area of 40 acres, was selected in 1409. Dragon Hill lies to the east and Crouching Tiger Hill to the west.

    In 1424 the Yongle Emperor, Zhu Di, was the first Ming Emperor to be buried here in his mausoleum called the Changling. He was the third Ming Emperor. His father and founder of the Ming Dynasty, Zhu Yuanzhang, was buried in Nanjing. All in, 13 of 16 Ming Emperors were buried in this royal necropolis, including Empresses and many concubines, some buried alive to accompany the Emperor to his "life after death."

    Only three tombs are opened to the public - Changling of the Yongle Emperor, Dingling of the Wanli Emperor and Zhaoling of the Longqing Emperor.

    Dingling, Tomb of Certainty, is the resting place of the 13th Ming ruler, the useless Wanli Emperor, Zhu Yijun, whose claim to fame was his long life. He ascended the throne at the age of ten years and ruled for 48 years. When the Dingling was completed in 1581 after 6 years of construction & 38 years before his death, he held a grand feast to celebrate his future interment.

    The discovery of the entrance to the 27 meter deep underground chamber of Dingling tomb is interesting. A small tablet was unearthed in the vicinity and the Chinese characters indicated a site and a depth. Archaeologists on following the instructions discovered a doorway to Dingling and started evacuation in 1956. Within two years the excavation was completed and the tomb was found to have jewellery and artifacts including jade belts, golden chopsticks and a crown worn by the Wanli Emperor himself. The underground chamber is made up of five marbled hall -- a central hall surrounded by four other halls.

    Don't forget to visit the small museum at the Dingling Tomb where you can see the jewellery, artifacts and some photos.

    Ming Tombs Emperor Wanli Central Chamber (underground)
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    Ming Tombs

    by yellowbell Updated Nov 13, 2005

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    We visited Ming Tombs after our exhausting morning excursion to the Great Wall.

    Ming Tombs is the general name given to mausoleums of the 13 emperors of the Ming Dynasty. I only got to visit Changling, the tomb of emperor Zhudi and his empresses. On exhibit are golden cups, hairpins with various gemstones, headress with finely woven gold threads and silk robes.

    Before approaching the Soul Tower, there was an arch called the Ghost Gate that our tour guide said we should not pass. I don't want to be unlucky so we just went around it. For good views of the mountains and plains of Changping, have your picture taken while on top of the Soul Tower.

    Underground Dingling Palace requires another 200 yuan and might be too musty for me to visit.

    Soul Tower - Ming Tomb with my parents
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    Chang Ling

    by Mairo21 Updated Oct 25, 2005

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    Open: 8am-5pm daily
    The resting place for 13 of the 16 Ming emperors. The 1st, 2nd, and 7th emperors are buried in different locations.This site was chosen for its location and its auspicious feng shui alignment. The tombs are protected on 3 sides due to mountain range that lies to the North. detering any evil spirits thought to be brought along the north wind. Chang Ling is the first tomb to be built. It took 2 years for renovation, and was opened in 1958. The emperor, his wife, and concubines are still thought to be buried behind the Spirit Tower under a huge earthen mound.

    Statue ot third Ming emperor Large Incense Burner The Spirit Tower The other tombs can be seen in the distance. Cedar columns in Hall of Eminent Favor

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    Ming Tombs

    by Blatherwick Written Aug 3, 2005

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    The Ming Dynasty Tombs site was chosen by the third Ming dynasty emperor Yongle (1402 - 1424), who moved the Capital City of China back from Nanjing to the present location of Beijing. Later, tombs of succeeding Ming Dynasty Emperors were also situated here, totaling 13 in all. At present, three tombs have been excavated. The largest and the one most often visited is that of Ding Ling. There really isn't much to see in the place as anything of note has been removed and taken to museums.

    After establishing his Capital City and the newly built Imperial Palace of residence (the Forbidden City) in 1420 CE, the Emperor set to work on selecting his burial site and creating his own mausoleum. The Shisan Ling site was selected by Emperor Yongle and he was the first to be entombed there.

    The site of the Ming Dynasty Imperial Tombs was carefully chosen according to then customary Feng Shui principles. According to these, bad spirits and evil winds descending from the North must be deflected; therefore, an arc-shaped area at the foot of the Jundu Mountains north of Beijing was selected. This 40 square kilometer area - enclosed by the mountains in a pristine, quiet valley full of dark earth, tranquil water and other necessities as per Feng Shui - would become the necropolis of The Ming Dynasty.

    Tomb of Ding Ling
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