Tiananmen Square, Beijing

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  • Tiananmen Square
    by PeterVancouver
  • Tiananmen Square
    by PeterVancouver
  • Tiananmen Square
    by PeterVancouver
  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    Going round a Square and what a big Square it is!

    by xuessium Updated Aug 11, 2007

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    TIANANMEN SQUARE [天安门广场]

    The largest open-urban square in the world. 880m south to north and 500 m east to west, occupying a total area of 440,000 square ms. Built in 1417 during the Ming Dynasty, this large plaza near the center of Beijing, China, was named after the Tiananmen [天安门] (literally, Gate of Heavenly Peace) which sits to its north, separating it from the Forbidden City. This place has bear witness to much of modern Chinese history as it was the site of several key events, the most recent has been the bloodstained Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.

    Today, the Square is peaceful. But don't let illusions deceive you. There is a heavy presence of uniformed police (and I suspect plenty of non-uniformed ones) ready to spring into action, I would surmise, at the 1st stir of trouble.

    That shouldn't stop you for mingling with the thousands of visitors to the Square each day. The sheer size of the Square meaning you may actually have some private space to yourself in crowded China!

    There are several buildings and monuments of note on/around the Square itself. Take time to explore them. The 38m high Monument to the People's Heroes breaks the plateau-like monotony and behind it lies the grandiose Mausoleum of Mao Zedong & Qianmen. To the west, you'll see the solemn Great Hall of the People (Parliament) and to the east, the National Museum of China.

    Everyday, the pompous National flag raising and lowering ceremonies attract plenty of onlookers and this is the moment for you to experience the electricity of Chinese patriotism.

    The Square is lit by gigantic lampposts that looked like Chinese lanterns, which also doubles up as banner hangers. There are trucks selling snacks & drinks on the Square so no worries about thirsting yourself to death. Unfortunately, you get the annoying peddlars and touts as well, which honestly, could do with some tanks rolling in to get rid of them for a positive change!

    MonumentToThePeople'sHeroes GreatHallOfThePeople
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  • rosie235's Profile Photo

    This square is huge and steeped in so much history

    by rosie235 Written Jul 20, 2007

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    Mao addressed the people from this square in 1949 when he declared the founding of the Peoples Republicc of China.

    The square also became well known around the world as shocking images of the demonstration by pro- democracy supporters, were beamed across the world.

    Any hope you have of quietly reflecting on the past as you wander about the aquare are gone by the way side as you are hounded to buy caps, postcards, watches etc. The street vendors can be very insistant and annoying but they do accept no as an answer and leave you alone.

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  • nattybabe's Profile Photo

    Tiananmen Square

    by nattybabe Written Jun 4, 2007

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    Tiananmen Square occupies an area of 122 acres and is big enough to hold half a million people. In its history the square has witnessed the Chinese people struggle against foreign aggression and reactionary rule at home, most recently and notably during prodemocracy rallies in 1989.

    Visiting the square, you can feel free to fly a kite, see the ceremonial raising or lowering of the flag at sunrise or sunset, or just wonder around feeling very small whilst under Chairman Mao's watchful eye.

    From the square you can visit the Monument to the People's Heroes and Chairman Mao's Mausoleum (closed when I visited in May 2007). It is also the perfect place to start a Beijing city walk and access the Forbidden City.

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  • bsfreeloader's Profile Photo

    A Concrete Jungle

    by bsfreeloader Written May 22, 2007

    The history and significance of Tian’an Men Square has been well-chronicled elsewhere. Suffice it to say that as of May 24, 2007, the square is still there, it’s still big, it’s still heaving with people (including touts and hawkers), and it’s still nothing but a square full of concrete bordered by some more interesting tourist attractions.

    Just south of the square
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    Tianenmen Square, Forbidden Palace

    by Stargazer1 Updated May 11, 2007

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    This is a view of the Forbidden Palace at Tianenmen Square when it's quite early and not crowded. This place evokes strong emotions, remembrances of events past. More impressive and emotion-stirring than the picture can convey.

    Forbidden Palace, Tianenmen Square, Beijing
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  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    Tian An Men at night

    by kokoryko Updated Apr 24, 2007

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    As I told in the intro, my free time was in evenings and nights, so many places (in fact all) were closed when I was there, and I only could walk around during night or pass nearby. It may give an overall bad or strange impression, specially with the misty polluted weather. But it was like that, so I cannot change it. It was strange to see these buildings lits with thousands of bulbs, a bit a Christmas atmosphere?


    Main picture: this building with the red star is the Museum of the Chinese Revolution, located on the Eastern side of Tian An Men square; the picture has been taken from Dong Jiao Min Jiang street, a very quiet street in Beijing, where lots of official buildings are located.(even a police museum!)
    Picture 2: And on the Western side, is the People’s Assembly Hall, with the white star this time; both buildings look a bit Victorian to me, specially with the lights underlining their main lines.
    Picture 3: The Obelisk and in the background, the heaven peace gate; at night, the whole Tian An Men square is forbidden for the pedestrian (and all vehicles, of course), and it was a bit frustrating not getting closer to the Obelisk or the Mausoleum, as they were well lit; ah, after 9.30 p.m., it is time to go to bed: all lights are shut down. . .
    Picture 4: The gate of heavenly peace, Mao, so the visit to Tian An Men finishes.
    Picture 5:Ah, Beijing is preparing the Olympic games and the Chinese are very proud of that. Here, on the western side of Tian An Men, at the front of the Museum of the Chinese Revolution building, is this display telling how much time we have to wait for this great event; ah, you even can calculate at what time (universal or local) I made the picture, if you know when the Games begin!

    Museum of chinese revolution People's Assembly Hall Monument to the heroes and gate to heaven peace Gate of heavenly peace count down
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    Tian An Men at day

    by kokoryko Updated Apr 24, 2007

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    Tian An Men Square is a bad souvenir in the heart of all democrats of the world; on this place, young people fighting for freedom (yes their freedom conception, why not?) have been crushed by the People’s Army tanks. Today of course, most of people visiting this place do not think about and this Tian An Men square is a tourist destination in Beijing; it must be said that lots of history happened here, before this last tragic event. And the buildings around are known China wide and some of them world wide.
    The people’s assembly hall is on the western side, the forbidden city on the northern side, the blablabla on the eastern side, and behind the “chairman’s" (they call president Mao like that) mausoleum are two big towers before you reach the end of the square. Of course, as Chinese do not things at small scale, Tian An Men is said to be the widest open square of the world.

    Main picture:This young soldier takes his job very seriously; watching in front of Mao’s mausoleum on Tian An Men Square.
    Picture 2:A big monument to the glorification of the workers, soldiers, peasants, etc. etc. (any teacher, journalist, scientist, there?) being on guard at Mao’s Mausoleum. Many Chinese tourists visit Tian An Men and like to take photographs there.
    Picture 3:Here is a group of tourists.
    Picture 4: The “obelisk” in the middle of the square; you cannot approach this monument, which is dedicated to the heroes of the revolution (oops! The Revolution
    Picture 5: Usual weather in Beijing (told me my colleagues in the office here), misty a big part of the day, the season, the year. . . . This is the southern entrance of the forbidden city

    Gard in front of Mao's mausoleum Mao's mausoleum All orange caps this way! Monument to the heroes of the revolution misty March weather
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  • shamenc's Profile Photo

    The square where the 4th June incident took place

    by shamenc Updated Mar 22, 2007

    This is where the 6/4 incident took place if you even remember... many years back.. there was a stike/protest that was held in TianAnMen square... mostly students i believe.. and i was less then 10yrs old then so i don't remember much..

    but i remember it was at TianAnMen sq and i also recalled quite a number of the students died....

    But seriously, if you are not interested in the background.. when you reach there.. it's really just a square... and there's a Mao's Museum there... with a SUPER long queue. We didn't manage to get it.. but i guess it would be interesting to see him in the coffin and probably pay respect to a great man like him

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  • Mr.Sparkle's Profile Photo

    Tiananmen Square

    by Mr.Sparkle Written Feb 14, 2007

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    If you decide to enter the tower at Tiananmen Square, make sure use the lockers near the entrance to hold your bags. The guards there won’t let anyone through with a bag. They wouldn’t even let me go though with my camera bag, even after x-raying it. I had to go out and put it in a locker and wait on line again. It is a mild interesting trip up and around the top though. Certainly worth ten minutes of you time before or after you enter the Forbidden City.

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  • albaaust's Profile Photo

    People watch

    by albaaust Updated Feb 10, 2007

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    This is the largest public square in the world so its one place you need to go to just to people watch. It was also one of the few places I was able to get a copy of Mao’s Little Red Book. (15 Yuan)

    From Tiananmen Gate/the Forbidden City go under the underpass to reach the square. Beware of numerous touts selling postcards, items of clothing. Go during the day or night.

    Tiananmen Square from Tiananmen Gate
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  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Tiananmen Square

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 23, 2006

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    This is the largest square in the world, with an area of 440,000 square metres and is located right in front of the Forbidden City. Over a period of several hundred years, many meetings and democracy demonstrations were held in front of the square. There are several buildings of interest around the square – in the centre is the Monument to the People’s heroes, West is the Great Hall of the People, the site of the China National People's Congress meetings. At the East of the square is the National museum of China, and at the South is the Chairman Mao memorial hall. I was surprised when I arrived at the square at 8am to already see hundreds of people queuing to see his remains. Visitors are apparently allowed a couple of minutes to file past the coffin.

    Tiananmen Square from Tiananmen Gate Queue to see Chairman Mao's remains, Tiananmen Sq Chairman Mao Memorial hall, Tiananmen Square Monument to the People's heroes, Tiananmen Square Great Hall of the People - Tiananmen Square

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  • limledi's Profile Photo

    Tiananmen Square

    by limledi Updated Dec 18, 2006

    Tiananmen Square is quite a huge place. You need to wear something sturdy and comfy coz it requires a lot of walking, practically the whole day. But it's quite worth it with plenty to see. Aside from the numerous buildings and monuments around the area, you can also do people watching. Interesting to see several local people strolling aside from the tourists.

    Tiananmen Square Tiananmen Square Tiananmen Square Tiananmen Square Tiananmen Square
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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Tiananmen Square

    by SLLiew Written Nov 7, 2006

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    According to history, this very large square was created after the Boxer Rebellion.

    Today it is a major landmark of Beijing. It is named after Tiananmen "Heavenly Peace Gate" which is the main south gate of the Imperial Palace of the Forbidden City.

    Around the Square are important administrative buildings and museums.

    Also located at the Square is the Maosoleum of Chairman Mao. We stood in line, no bags or cameras allowed and saw the preserved body of the man who led the Communist Party to victory in 1949 to rule mainland China.

    Any visit to Beijing will not be complete without dropping by the Square which is heavily guarded by the PLA, People's Liberation Army.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Modern prospectus

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Oct 9, 2006

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    Teananmen Square is crossed by the main and widest prospectus of Pekin - Chanan. Its length - forty kilometers. Solid and impressive buildings of construction of 1950-th, and also modern skyscrapers on the both sides stand.

    Beijing - prospectus Beijing - prospectus Beijing - prospectus Beijing - prospectus Beijing - prospectus
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Teananmen Square History (cont)

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Oct 9, 2006

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    We walked around the area, admired Mao's portrait and a view at Mausoleum of Mao. Hundreds other people walked round the square. Some of them started kites. In general, the square completely justified the name of the Square of heavenly calmness.

    Then we did not know yet, that only in a half of a year its name becomes a common noun in connection with demonstration of students which within a week kept the square, and demanded democratic transformations.

    It appears, the history is managed in our days?

    Beijing - Teananmen Square
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