Changling Travel Guide

  • Changling
    by Willettsworld
  • Changling
    by Willettsworld
  • Changling
    by Willettsworld

Changling Things to Do

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    by Willettsworld Updated Aug 9, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    50 kilometers (30 miles) northwest from Beijing lies the Ming Tombs - the general name given to the mausoleums of 13 emperors of the Ming Dynasty (1368 - 1644). The mausoleums have been perfectly preserved, as has the necropolis of each of the many emperors. The site was chosen by the third Ming Dynasty emperor Yongle (1402–1424), who moved the capital of China from Nanjing to the present location of Beijing. He is credited with envisioning the layout of the ancient city of Beijing as well as a number of landmarks and monuments located therein. After the construction of the Imperial Palace (the Forbidden City) in 1420, the Yongle Emperor selected his burial site and created his own mausoleum. Only the Changling and Dingling tombs are open to the public.

    I visited the main tomb of Changling as part of a tour which also included the Great Wall of China at Badaling for RMB130 that my hotel (a Home Inn - see my Beijing accommodation tips) had at their reception. This also included lunch, transport, a visit to a duck factory shop and a jade factory shop and a tour guide (although it was in Chinese with other Chinese tourists).

    Open: 8.30am-5.30pm. Admission: RMB45.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 9, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Yongle Emperor, his wife, and 16 concubines are thought to be buried in the burial mound but it has never been excavated.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 9, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This tower lies in front of the burial tomb mound of the Emperor Yongle. It was once a wooden-framed building during the Ming dynasty but was reconstructed to its present style in 1787. There is a sacred stele inside the tower that was re-erected in 1605 after the tower was struck by lightning. It is inscribed with the words "Mausoleum of Emperor Chengzu" - the name given to the Yongle Emperor after becoming emperor following a civil war.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Changling Favorites

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 9, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Yongle Emperor (May 2, 1360 – August 12, 1424), born Zhu Di (Chu Ti), was the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty of China from 1402 to 1424. He moved the capital from Nanjing to Beijing, and constructed the Forbidden City. After its dilapidation and disuse during the Yuan Dynasty and Emperor Hongwu's reign, the Yongle Emperor had the Grand Canal of China repaired and reopened in order to supply the new capital of Beijing in the north with a steady flow of goods and southern foodstuffs. He commissioned most of the exploratory sea voyages of Zheng He. During his reign the monumental Yongle Encyclopaedia was completed.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Changling

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

95 travelers online now

Comments

Changling Travel Guide
Map of Changling

View all Changling hotels