Memorial Hall of the Nanjing Massacre, Nanjing

4.5 out of 5 stars 6 Reviews

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  • Monuments outside the Nanjing Massacre Museum
    Monuments outside the Nanjing Massacre...
    by Rabbityama
  • Memorial Outside Nanjing Massacre Museum
    Memorial Outside Nanjing Massacre Museum
    by Rabbityama
  • Nanjing Massacre Memorials
    Nanjing Massacre Memorials
    by Rabbityama
  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    Memorial to Nanjing Massacre

    by SLLiew Written Sep 8, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are many eerie photos of the thousands that were massacred by the Japanese soldiers during World War II known as the "Rape of Nanking". At that time, Nanjing was the capital of China. Only a few living survivors and their descendants are accorded special treatment and status by PRC.

    As mentioned, I arrived too late to enter the memorial and took a photo from outside. So be early and reach there before 4pm to have enough time to tour.

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  • Rabbityama's Profile Photo

    Nanjing Massacre Memorial Museum

    by Rabbityama Written Jul 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Remains of the Victims of the Nanjing Massacre
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    A museum and memorial dedicated to all those who who died in the Nanjing Massacre (also known as the Rape of Nanjing) during WWII, as well as survivors who were raped or attacked by the Japanese army. Although the exact number killed will never be known, it is estimated that 300,000 people were killed in eight weeks from the takeover in December 13, 1937, equalling one death every 12 seconds. Outside the museum, there are many monuments, as well as an excavated section of the city filled with human remains.

    Inside the museum are exhibits of the attrocities committed here, particularly against civilians. Exhibits are written in Chinese, English, and Japanese, so visitors will be able to understand them. The images and information can be quite graphic, but unfortunately, it is all very real.

    Although this event and the greater war surrounding it have strained relations between Chinese and Japanese, the museum does not actually depict the Japanese negatively. By no means does it sugar coat any part of the massacre, but it is focused more on the event as a tragedy of humanity. It includes accounts by Chinese survivors, as well as Japanese soldiers that were there and recorded their feelings, mostly of torment and shame about what happened here. These accounts were important for the trials and to censor those who attempted to say the event did not occur.

    Upon leaving, the museum gives a similar message to that found in the Atomic Bomb Museum in Hiroshima; the need for peace.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • socrates_07's Profile Photo

    Memorial to the Nanjing Massacre

    by socrates_07 Updated Mar 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Memorial to the Nanjing Massacre

    West of the Mochou Hu Park is the Memorial to the Nanjing Massacre. It is a must-see museum which touched me a lot. I have to admit, at the beginning I took photos as normaly but after a short while I wasnt able to take more photos. And not because it was prohibited.
    A visit to this grim, gravelly garden includes a gruesome display of victims' skulls and bones, half-buried in the dirt as well as a clearly marked pictographic account of the butchery. See this to understand the incredible sufferings endured by the Chinese people during World War II. Hearteningly, the last room is devoted to reconciliation between the Japanese and Chinese people with displays of contrite letter written by Japanese schoolchildren.

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  • albaaust's Profile Photo

    Nanjing memorial Massacre:Closed for renovation

    by albaaust Written Jan 19, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We were interested in going to this museum as we have an interest in Chinese history. The museum itself is quite a distance from the centre of Nanjing so it was with some disappointment we discovered that the museum is closed for renovation.

    Not sure when it will open but don’t go just yet.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Memorial Hall of the Nanjing Massacre

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This was one of the most interesting and harrowing places I've ever visited. The memorial hall was built for the people killed in the Nanjing Massacre by the Japanese army in and around the then capital of China, Nanjing, after it fell to the Imperial Japanese Army on December 13, 1937. It is located near a site where thousands of bodies were buried, called a "pit of ten thousand corpses". It was built in 1985 by the Nanjing Municipal Government in memory of the 300,000 victims who lost their lives during the Nanjing Massacre. In 1995, it was enlarged and renovated. The memorial exhibits historical records and objects, and uses architecture, sculptures, and videos to illustrate what happened during the Nanjing Massacre. But some of the most vivid exhibits are those of the people who were executed in photographs taken by Japanese photographers as well as skeletal remains of victims.

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  • yeikloen's Profile Photo

    Nanjing Massacre Museum

    by yeikloen Written Jan 22, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nanjing Massacre Museum

    In December 1937, Nanjing fell to the Japanese Imperial Army. The Japanese army launched a massacre for six weeks. According to the records of several welfare organizations which buried the dead bodies after the Massacre, around three hundred thousand people, mostly civilians and POWs, were brutally slaughtered.
    Over twenty thousand cases of rape were reported. Many of the victims were gang raped and then killed. The figure did not include those captives who were sent to army brothels (the so-called "comfort stations").

    The actual Memorial Hall is built on one of the mass grave to commemorate the victims.

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