Tai'an Things to Do

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    Dai Temple

    by ellyse Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Main entrance
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    Admission fee is 20 RMB, student price 10 RMB.
    Big temple complex with exhibits illustrating the history of Taishan (East Taoist peak).
    There're also Song-dynasty frescos in the main hall, you'll need to pay 1 RMB for shoe covers to go in and have a closer look.

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    Tai Shan

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    Tai Shan (meaning Mount Tai) is one of the "Five Sacred Mountains" of Taoism. It is associated with sunrise, birth, and renewal, and is often regarded the foremost of the five. The temples on its slopes have been a destination for pilgrims for 3,000 years, one of which, known as Jade Emperor Temple, is at the mountains summit at 1532 metres (5028 ft). It is located to the north of the city where pilgrims embark on their journey from the Dai Temple and up the mountain via a series of over 6,500 arduous steps past 22 temples, 11 gates, 14 archways, 14 kiosks, 4 pavilions, 819 stone tablets, and 1,018 cliff-side and stone inscriptions. If you don't fancy the hard climb up you can simply take a bus up to the halfway point where cable cars will whisk you the rest of the way to the summit. I decided not to climb the whole mountain but instead took a bus to the halfway point, climbed the hardest part to the summit, took a cable car back down to the halfway point and then walked the rest of the way down and back to Tai'an. This meant that I got to see nearly everything on the mountain by either ascending or descending it. You can see more about it by visiting my Tai Shan page below:

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    Daizong Archway

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    This archway is located to the north of the Dai Temple on the road that leads to Tai Shan. It was built during the Ming dynasty in 1568. In 1780, Ding Zaobao, an imperial envoy, rebuilt it by imperial decree and included a horizontal inscribed board on it.

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    Dai Temple - Bronze Pavilion

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    Also called Jin Que, the bronze pavilion was cast in 1615. In the pavilion is enshrined a Taoist deity. It was originally located in the Bi Xia Temple on Tai Shan before being moved into the Ling Ying Palace in the south-west of the city at the beginning of the Qing dynasty and then moved here in 1972.

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    Dai Temple - Hall of Heavenly Blessing

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    This hall is the main structure within the Dai Temple complex. It was built during the Song dynasty in 1009. In front of the hall there is a huge Ming Dynasty iron censer and two Song Dynasty pails. On each side of the censer and pails stands a pavilion with a stone tablet erected within it. On the tablet are inscribed the poems of Qianlong, a great emperor in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). In the hall is enshrined the God of Tai Shan which is about four meters (13 feet) high. Above the shrine is hung the plaque inscribed with four Chinese characters 'Pei', 'Tian', 'Zuo' and 'Zhen' written by Kangxi, an emperor in the Qing Dynasty. On the walls of the hall is painted a giant Taoist mural. It is said that the mural had been painted in the Song Dynasty. With a height of three meters (10 feet) and a length of 62 meters (203 feet), it depicts the scene of the God of Tai Shan having a tour of inspection and coming back to his palace.

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    Dai Temple - Stele

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    The Dai Temple is also famed as the forest of stone tablets (stele). It houses many stone inscriptions of different periods in history with some dating from the Han Dynasty (202 BC - 220 AD). The most celebrated is Li Si's inscriptions. Li was the Prime Minister in the Qin Dynasty (221BC-206BC).

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    Dai Temple - Han Interlocked Cypress

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    This sprawling cypress tree is said to have been planted by Emperor Liu Che during the Han dynasty (202 BC - 220 AD). Emperor Qianlong of the Qing dynasty in 1771 once visited the tree and put a stone tablet beside it to praise it.

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    Daimiao Fang

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    This wonderful archway lies to the south of the Dait Temple and is decorated with 4 pairs of lions, dragons & phoenix motifs. Built in 1672, the archway is about 12 meters (39 feet) high and 10 meters (31 feet) wide. The columns of the archway are also inscribed with couplets praising the God of the Mt. Taishan.

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    Dai Temple

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    Situated in the middle of the city centre, this temple is one of the largest and most famous Taoist temples in China due to its proximity to Tai Shan - one of the five most sacred Taoist mountains in the country.

    Covering an area of 96,000 square meters (24 acres), the Dai Temple is about 405 metres (1,329 feet) long from south to north and 237 metres (778 feet) wide from east to west. Constructed in the Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD), it had been renovated by the emperors in the past dynasties and became prosperous in the Tang (618-907) and Song (960-1279) Dynasties. The temple is where the emperors make sacrifice to the Gods of Heaven and Earth and worship the God of Tai Shan. The temple has various architectural structures including the Tiankuang Hall, the Yaocan Pavilion, the Zhengyang Gate, the Bell Tower, the Drum Tower, the Han Dynasty Cypress Courtyard and the Tang Dynasty Pagoda Tree Courtyard. Pilgrims start at the temple before making their ascent up the mountain. Therefore it should be on your itinerary if you're visiting Tai Shan.

    Admission: RMB20.

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    Yaocan Pavilion

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    Also called Caocanmen or Caocan Pavilion, the Yaocan Pavilion is located outside the South Gate of the Dai Temple. In front of the pavilion is an archway, iron lions, a flag pole and the Double Dragon Pool. The pavilion has a main hall and two side halls. Once, in the main hall, was enshrined Bixia Yuanjun, a Taoist deity.

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    Dai Temple - Iron tower

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    The iron tower was cast in 1565 and originally had 13 tiers. During the Anti-Japanese War (1937-1945), it was destroyed and only four tiers remain.

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    Dai Temple - Scripture Pillar

    by Willettsworld Updated Jul 18, 2009

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    This once octagonal stone pillar is 6.4 metres in height and was built between the Tang and Song dynasties.

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    Dai Temple - Wall & Gates

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 18, 2009

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    The Dai Temple complex is about 405 metres (1,329 feet) long from south to north and 237 metres (778 feet) wide from east to west. It is surrounded by a large wall which has some impressive gates.

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Tai'an Things to Do

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