Chengdu Restaurants

  • Kirin Hot Pot exterior
    Kirin Hot Pot exterior
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    Kirin Hot Pot interior
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    Hot Pot
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Most Recent Restaurants in Chengdu

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    Base Restaurants: Qingcheng Shan

    by John195123 Written Mar 5, 2008
    Base Food, Qingcheng Shan

    At the base of the mountain (it's not that tall) are a few restaurants that provide pretty good food and a neat, outdoor atmosphere. There's also one attached to the entrance and hotel. But the ones on the way up from the parking lot are nicer, in many ways, because they are less touristy... of course, you can still buy souvenirs there too.

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    Dodo's Cafe: Alive and well...

    by John195123 Written Mar 3, 2008
    Dodo's Outside
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    Nice place, popular with the tourists (especially from The Loft), they have English menus and western food as well as some Chinese offerings.

    Favorite Dish: Pizza... there, I admit it. I wanted to find something without MSG. It turns out, in fact, that these guys don't use any MSG. Yay!

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    Don't know!: Fast and hot

    by John195123 Written Feb 27, 2008

    The airport bus stops on what feels like a totally random street. Just nearby, however, is a nice fast food place that serves Sichuan foods... get the fried rice.

    Favorite Dish: The fried rice is good, and hot-ish... not too bad.

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  • jukebox79's Profile Photo

    Huangcheng Ba Niurou Guan: A good experience for the local dishes

    by jukebox79 Updated Jul 31, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are so many restaurants offering local spicy food, tasted but with low price. This one is so near my hotel so why not hv a try?
    Remember you hv to help yrself to get the bowls and chopsticks from the dish sterilizer. The waitress will not help. :-O

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    Spicy Sichuan Hot Pot

    by explorer001 Written Oct 1, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is more on the food, rather than the restaurant names...

    I ordered frog legs cooked with the sichuan spices and I ended up using half a box of tissue, as amused locals (including the waitresses) watch me eat.
    After that, they turned the same dish into hotpot - by adding water... then I started putting other fresh ingredients like beef, vege, etc in it...
    Once boiled, and a few bites later, i started using up the other half of the tissue box...
    All during autumn (about 20+ celcius at night)....

    The beers are cheap ... a 600ml bottle (big) for RMB 10 in restaurants, and about RMB 15-20 in pubs - see nightlife section.

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  • maysue's Profile Photo

    Any hotpot restaurants around Chengdu: Experience of being spice up

    by maysue Written Aug 10, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me before the hot pot feast

    Remember the Spice Girls? Well those girls can't beat this Chengdu hotpot. I tried a spoonful of it and boy, it was definitely a mind-blowing experience that leaves my tongue and gum numb for half an hour before it comes to live again. Anything I eat at that time seems to be tasteless for awhile. I think it's a good idea to have this HOTPOT before one wants to visit the dentist for tooth extraction! At least, your gums are numb before the extraction and it saves you some money for the anaesthetic too. Ha! Ha! Ha!

    Favorite Dish: P/S: Drink milk or soya bean drink to sooth the burn in your mouth; please don't try with gassy, soft drinks - you'll make it worse! Better still, make sure you have the Fire Dept. phone number in hand when you want to put out the 'fire' in your mouth.

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    More numbing and schorching hot pot story

    by maysue Written Aug 10, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yin Yang Hotpot of the 'mild' and the 'hots'

    This Sichuan hotpot is no ordinary hotpot - it has onion, garlic and chili, but also the mind-blowing seeds known as 'Sichuan Peppers' or "Huajiao"! In fact, you can request the waiter/waitresses (fuwuyuan) to reduce the amount of these seeds in your hotpot. If u can't take it but still want to try it, then take the half hot and half light, chicken stock hotpot. That's what we did. Unfortunately, some of the hot soup (while boiling, it did a high jump and landed the other side) sort of got into my chicken stock; hence, making it hot too.

    Favorite Dish: Well, this hot pot is different from any other hot pots I've tried - these Sichuanese seems to favor an oily-red broth that can really set one's eyes stinging or on fire. My tourmate, HouJing, got her eye stung by one of the spurts made by the boiling, bubbling, fiery-like valcano broth that she needed to wash her eyes with plenty of water. As for me, I was choking unbearably with my eyes being smoked to tears - at that moment, I can almost hear the song "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes" BUT I must admit the hot pot was GOOD!

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  • maysue's Profile Photo

    Any hotpot restaurants around Chengdu: Schorching, Numbing, Spicy Hot Pot

    by maysue Updated Aug 10, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chengdu Yin-Yang HotPot

    To start off, u need to choose any restaurant (good and reputable) within Chengdu city and try their hot, sweating-like-sauna, local specialty hotpot. I thought it was going to be similar to the one I eat in Beijing since hotpot is generally a northern dish which usually contains boiling broth dipped with huge chunks of meats usually mutton or beef and some vegetables plus mushrooms.

    Favorite Dish: It's a challenging dish that needs a lot of tolerance for its fiery, hot, burn, gum numbing effects - good to eat during winter though!

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  • Any Hot Pot: HOT POT TOO HOT 4 U???

    by jmpgfoto Written Jul 11, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    HOT POT doesn't necessarily mean that it's Sichuan hot. In most of the Chengdu hot pot restaurants where we dine you get a divided wok. One side is the sizzling hot chili oil and the other side is a sort of chicken stock. You can dip your food in the wild side or the mild side or both (meat, vegetables, whatever). So hot pot doesn't have to be so hot!

    Favorite Dish: In Chengdu we've never had a bad meal or a big bill (by U.S. standards). I've enjoyed everything from hot pot to tofu restaurants (even Ma Po Tofu which can be pretty spicy). One place I really enjoy is the Minshan hotel. The restaurant on the top is elegant and not very expensive with lots of Chinese specialities. It's a great place to take guests because the view is wonderful (all around the city). Service is superb.

    Another major hotel, the Jin Jang is also good but more expensive and not as good as Minshan. We did dine several times at the Jin Jang and once in their Japanese restaurant which I wouldn't recommend. It was OK but not up to what it should be at the price, I would only rate it as fair.

    The real deal is at the smaller restaurants, and places like the Wenshu Temple which has a superb Buddhist vegetarian restaurant where you would swear there was meat in some of the dishes. They do a superb job of making vegetable / tofu seem like meat!!!

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  • nepalgoods's Profile Photo

    Hot Hot Hot!: Sichuan Cuisine

    by nepalgoods Written Jun 21, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Among the eight major cuisines of China, Sichuan cuisine is the most popular.
    Chuan Dish is an example of Sichuan cuisine. Sichuan cooking has a long history and has become famous for its special flavour. Sichuan is known for its attention to color, smell, and presentation with an emphasis on taste. Sichuan is well known for the richness, broadness and thickness of its taste. It is mainly composed of "numbing, hot, salty, sweet, sour, bitter and fragrant". The flexible combination of different flavors creates several compounded tastes such as numb and hot, sour and hot, red pepper oil and white pepper oil, among others. The richness and excellence of flavor helps rank Sichuan the top Chinese dish. It has won the praise of "one dish, one style, a hundred dishes, a hundred tastes".
    Sichuan dish is good at agile exertion and specific managing according to material, climate and the diners' requests. More that 30 methods of cooking are included --- stir fry, sauté, deep fry, grill, preserve, bittern, bake and pickle.

    As the production develops and economy prospers, Sichuan absorbs the strength of northern and southern food to form a fusion between a northern dish with Sichuan style and a southern dish with Sichuan taste. It is complemented as "Food in China, taste in Sichuan."

    Sichuan concentrates on the changing of taste, which differs in thickness and heaviness. You can not make a Sichuan dish without chili, prickly ash and pepper. Chili, for example, can be used in various ways. Sometimes it can be the main ingredient, or sometimes it can be a secondary ingredient used for seasoning. The taste of Sichuan can differ largely according to climate and the diner's personal tastes. For instance, the hotness is quite rich in winter and spring because the weather is cold. However the hotness should be reduced by 30% in summer and autumn due to the warm and dry weather. The taste of Sichuan is very delicate and flexible. Therefore, Sichuan is famous for its rich, thick and heavy flavor in addition to its lightness.

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    Chen Ma Po Doufu: What? Y4.5?

    by mishkah Written May 27, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Short on ambience but abundant with grime, Chen Ma Po Doufu's speciality is tofu with ground pork and chilli. Or more precisely, chilli with a little tofu and ground pork.

    The chilli flavour is known as 'la'; the numbing Sichuan peppercorn flavour is known as 'ma'. Together in this quantity to a laowai like me, it's more like "ma la waaaaaahhhh!".

    Spicy! Very spicy. Make sure you beg for a glass of peanut milk. But for less than a dollar, you can't go wrong and it totally cleared up my burgeoning cold.

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  • Chen Ma Po Dou Fu?: Granma's Chen's Beancurd Restaurant

    by chihiro75 Updated May 21, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not sure about the Chinese name of the restaurant, but it's very well known among locals and tourists, although we didn't see any tourists the 2 times we went. The original famous Sichuan Tofu dish with minced meat and tofu in a spicy sauce. In Japan, it's become "Japanese" (like pizza in the US), so we really wanted to try the original. Well it was quite a shock. Nothing to do with the Japanese washed out version, not only "hot spicy", but with lots of spices and tasty and authentic. It was an eye opening experience after a lifetime spent eating Japanese Mabo Tofu.

    The service at the restaurant is very very average. No English spoken, but apparently somewhat understood. We went there twice and tried other dishes, the most interesting ones are still the tofu dishes, we also had some good soups.

    Downstairs is more casual, for a quick meal, and upstairs is more of a dining place with round tables, but the prices are the same I think and the atmosphere is Chinese at both -- eat , enjoy the food and no frills.

    They sell the Ma Po Dou Fu mix and we bought some and tried it at home, but it wasn't very good. Maybe we didn't have the right ingredients, or maybe it just wasn't the right environment.

    Across the street there's a Tao temple (I think) where we had tea outside in the temple grounds, quite pleasant.

    Favorite Dish: The restaurant specializes in Tofu (Dou fu or Dao fu in Chinese, Tofu is Japanese). There was one dish which we really liked: it said "flower tofu" on the menu, and it's actually "flower" like when we say "flower salt" in France -- meaning the finest. "Flower tofu" is tofu made with a much finer strainer to obtain a lighter and smoother texture, without becoming like what we call "silk tofu" in Japan (because it was passed through silk as opposed to rougher "cotton tofu"). Japanese tofu doesn't really taste of soy bean and is really bland, but Chinese tofu retains that soy bean taste. Flower tofu is so fine textured that it doesn't hold as well as the usual tofu, so it looks like it's shaped in a bowl and turned over. The Flower tofu dish is not spicy, it comes in a whitish sauce with greens, and may seem a bit bland if you only like spicy strong tasting stuff, but we really liked it -- it makes you realize what tofu should really taste like. It was a nice contrast with the spicy Ma Po Dou Fu. Oh by the way, we're Japanese so we could sort of read the menu in Chinese "flower tofu" was written in Chinese characters, I don't know whether they have an English menu and I don't know how they have translated it into English.

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  • no name just a little shop next to the dragon GH: wonderful little shop with only 2 bowls of noodles

    by chihiro75 Written May 19, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    there's this little shop in this little street in Chengdu, right next to the Dragon Guest House (maybe Dragon Youth Hostel?), We spent 3 weeks in China, and that was the only time we felt really relaxed...sipping tea and slurping noodles and watching the people live in this small backward street, playing Mah Jong on little tables outdoors in the evening, trying to cool down with hand held fans, sipping tea and of course everybody knows each other. It's an area which is fairly old for China, from what we heard the govnt. wants to tear it down to rebuild, so it may not be there anymore (we went in 2003). That would really be a pity. There's an old world feel to the whole place which we didn't encounter anywhere else (we haven't been to Beijing). At the end of the street, in the evening, there are lots of street vendors, barbecued meat and fish and sea food, fried stuff. Lots of fun.

    There are a few cafes on each side of the guest house, but the only one we went to was the little shop on the left. The little old man was really nice, and his neighbors were nice too. The bald foreigner on the photo is my husband. Most tourists at the guest house go to the cafe on the right, probably because they serve more tourist food and beer.

    Favorite Dish: I can't say it's a noodle shop, it's more like an old man selling tea and bowls of noodles to make a little bit of money. He serves several kinds of tea and a few kinds of noodle soups, with bits of egg, vegetables, meat or fish or vegetables. We went in and pointed at what we wanted. Absolutely no English spoken. The noodles are really nice although simple and cheap, pretty spicy Chengdu style.

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    Various restaurants in downtown Chengdu: Sichuan hot pot

    by aukahkay Written Feb 18, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Flaming hot and spicy Sichuan hotpot

    Sichuan cuisine is characterised by its hot and spicy sauces and oils. Even for ethnic Chinese like myself, I find Sichuan cuisine too strong and oily. For the Westerners, you may be familiar with `Kung Pao chicken' served in the Chinese restaurants in the West. Kung Pao chicken is diced chicken with dry red chilli, a Sichuan dish. There is more to Sichuan cuisine than Kung Pao chicken.

    Favorite Dish: You should try Sichuan hot pot. Basically, food is cooked in a double-barreled pot. The outer pot contains soup made of vegetable and meat stock while the inner barrel is a flaming concoction of spicy and hot soup. The food consists of quills eggs, wonton, meat nuggets, sausages, vermicelli, and vegetables. Immerse the food into the boiling soup and eat it with the soup.
    A word of caution: the spicy hot soup is likely to be too strong for the vast majority of Westerners. Singaporeans eat a lot of hot and spicy food but I gave the spicy hot soup a miss.

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    The ROO BAR - Chengdu: Friendly Aussie Expat Bar

    by Wocca Written Feb 1, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Sheila Or Two - Roo Bar
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    A fair dinkum, friendly Australian Expat 's Bar

    The owner Norm Sales is a real Aussie character
    that specializes in cooking hamburgers, meat pies,
    steak, & hot potato chips.

    Carlsberg, Fosters & Victoria Bitter beer in stock

    Favorite Dish: Heaps of tomato sauce to smother your Aussie food in ...

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Chengdu Restaurants

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