Tibet Favorites

  • Favorites
    by Sharrie
  • Favorites
    by wonga0
  • Favorites
    by Sharrie

Tibet Favorites

  • An order of Momo's, Please.

    Well, not an activity or site but one of my favorite things in Tibet is an order of Momo's. Momo's are basically dumplings. They typically will come in either meat of vegetable filling. Also, they are usually steamed but can be fried. If you do not specify, they will come steamed. The Momo's come with a red dipping sauce that is a bit spicy.This is...

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  • 5-person of same nationality policy...

    latest update: the 5-person of same nationality policy has already been lifted. now u can do the tour with u & your husband alone. and there wont be any problem of appying the Tibet Entry Permit.but since the cost of Kailash Kora is always high,it's always nice if u can share the cost with some others.so now u can start looking for any traveller of...

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  • How to see Tibet

    Your choice of how to visit is probably the most important decision you have to make: Unless you have a lot of money, or the rules have changed radically since May, you have no real choice. The Chinese government requires you to be on an organized tour. You can not travel by public bus outside of the cities. (I do not think you can even do this...

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  • Weather & general tip

    thanks !it was a great and breathtaking trip.. contrary to what others say visiting during winter is recommended -- it was not as cold as one might think, in fact weather is much better than Shanghai at that point in time :)with warm sun and all. yes, the altitude sickness is there, but only during night time and in 2-days it'll be gone in no time...

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  • Tibet - Group Travel is essential

    Independent travelers are allowed in Lhasa and Shigatse or so. But those big cities have nearly lost all flavor because of the strong Chinese influence. To visit real Tibet you need a trip on its own, bringing you to the East (Shangri-La) or West (Tibetan Plateau, Guge, Kailash), and for this special permits are required (very expensive), group...

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  • Land of Rivers

    I was amazed by the number of rivers and lakes that you can find in Tibet. I never thought that at such altitude there is so much water.Tibet has about 365 rivers, of which the Yarlung Tsangbo river is the "cradle' of the Tibetan people. It is also the highest river in the world.

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  • The Himalayas

    In the south of Tibet lies the world youngest but highest mountain range: the Himalayas. This range of snow-capped mountains forms a breathtaking view after driving for many hours through dessert and rocky landscape.

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  • Assembly Hall

    In a monastery the Assembly Hall is the spiritual center of the lives of the monks. It is mostly a dark place with banks for the praying monks.The walls are painted with scenes from the life of Buddha, other religious subjects or with representations of holy places. The framework is finely scuplted and painted, and columns decorated with colourful...

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  • Required permits

    First of all you need to know that permit regulations can change from day to day. It all depends on what is going on in Tibet or China at that moment. Anno 2007 you cannot enter and travel around Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) without a Chinese visa and the necessary permits.To enter Tibet you will need a TTB (Tibet Tourism Bureau) permit. This...

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  • Yaks

    Yaks are long-haired oxes that live on high altitude. They are very important in Tibet. People eat their meat, drink their milk, make cheese and butter for yak tea. The skin is dried to make boats and their fur is used for cloths and blankets.

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  • Mount Qomolangma

    Until I visited Tibet I had no idea that Mount Everest is just the name that the western world gives to the highest mountain in the world. It's real name is Mount Qomolangma.This mountain, with its 8,843 metres, is the highest peak of the Himalayas and is located on the border between Tibet and Nepal.Did you know that this mountain is still...

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  • Friendship Highway

    The 920 km road connecting Lhasa with Nepal is known as the Friendship Highway. It is a spectacular trip over desert plateaus and passes exceeding 5000 m. The highest pass is Gyatso-La pass at 5220 m

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  • Need to join a tour to visit Tibet?

    No, definitely do not need to join a tour to get into tibet. There will be plenty of travel agencies to choose from once you arrive in Lhasa if you preferred a tour. Prices are less expensive and the itinaries are a lot more flexible too.There are reasons in joing a tour though. If you have limited time but want to get in as many itinary as...

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  • Get train tickets ahead of time?

    Yes, we emailed a travel agent in Beijing, and asked him to buy train tickets for us 7 days ahead of time. He's commission was 50 rmb per ticket (about 7 usd). Ticket price is printed on the train ticket. Ours was 813 rmb for a lower berth hard sleeper.

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  • Need a tibet permit to buy plane/train...

    We bought our train ticket through a travel agent from Beijing. He did not ask about permit. When we flew out from Tibet to Beijing, no one care about the permit either.*We do not have first hand experience on regulations of FLYING INTO Tibet.

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  • Do you need a permit to visit Tibet?

    That depends on where you want to go once you arrive Lhasa. If you plan to visit only Lhasa area, Ganden, and Namtso, then no, don't bother with a permit if you take the train in. We took the train in from Beijing and did not have a permit. No one checked nor asked. Only passport and train ticket were checked. *but if you know you will be traveling...

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  • How to take good photos aboard the train...

    You will see spectacular scenery in either direction along the Qinghai Tibet railway. Unlike other trains in China, the Qinghai Tibet train cars have pressurized cabins and so none of the windows can be opened.This presents a significant obstacle to taking good pictures on the train. When you hold your camera up to the window, you will notice...

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  • Beautiful, curious children...

    As with many other children I would see, she was a beautiful child, terribly curious about foreigners who would park by the side of the road near her home in the middle of an otherwise empty horizon. She had earrings of both turquoise and coral and wore a heavy dark green jacket held together with a huge safety pin over blue corduroy pants.During...

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  • Go with a good attitude

    Don't go to Tibet with a nasty attitude torwards the Chinese occupation, or the thriving tourism industry in Tibet. Both will make your trip a very unpleasant and unenjoyable one. #1 The Han Chinese are there to stay. If you think lhasa is too Chinese, too modern...you are welcome to the remote villages with no running water, sewage running down...

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  • Atmospheric mist

    It is really worth visiting the Barkhor Square (in Lhasa) first thing in the morning, the atmosphere really is magical! There are many more pilgrims than any other time of day, and also many of the devotees will light fires in specially constructed ovens in order to create a misty effect. And the result is surreal. It has to be seen to be believed.

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  • Being the centre of attention

    Many of the pilgrims coming to the Barkhor Kora in Lhasa from remote villages in Tibet, had not seen westerners until the came across us. They were as curious about us as we were about them, but they were a little less subtle. Touching, especially patting one’s rear end, was common practice. Stroking blond hair, touching the skin and feeling the...

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  • The 21st Century arrives in Tibet

    A very bizarre incident happened inside the ground floor chapel in Utse Chapel in Samye. As we were walking around the chapel, a mobile phone started ringing. I was rather annoyed with my fellow travellers, that they couldn’t switch off their phone when in such a holy place, when I noticed a monk reaching inside his robe and bring out the latest...

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  • Norbulingka (Summer Palace)

    Norbulingka, meaning "Treasure Park", was first built in the 1740s. As a result of continuous expansion by the Dalai Lamas, it covers an area of 40 hectares. The Qing magistrate dispatched to Tibet built the original palace for His Holiness, the Seventh Dalai Lama who often visited the area. In 1751, the Seventh Dalai Lama began construction on the...

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  • Lhasa

    Lhasa is the gate way to one of the most fascinating places on earth. Despite the imposition of over 100,000 Chinese migrants to the city, Lhasa remains the heart and soul of Tibet. Tibetan culture and religion are so intertwined as to be inseperable, and most of the tourist sites of Lhasa are religious in nature. Because of its remoteness and the...

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  • Jokhang Temple

    Jokhang Temple has been a place of pilgrimage for centuries. It is the spiritual center of Lhasa and stands in the heart of the old city. It was built by King Songtsen Gampo, upon establishing his kingdom's capital in Lhasa. Through several renovations it expanded into quite a large group of buildings and now covers an area of over 25,000 sq...

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  • Sera Monastery

    Sera, one of the three largest monasteries of Gelugpa, sits at the foot of Hill Tatipu. It is as prestigious as Drepung and Ganden, which had a longer history. Sera in Tibetan means Wild Rose Garden since opulent wild rose woods once grew around it. A legend said Tsong Khapa and his two disciples once proceeded religious cultivation around. One...

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  • Drepung Monastery

    Drepung Monastery, the largest and richest monastery ever in Tibet, was founded in 1416 by a disciple of Tsong Khapa under the patron of a noble family and enlarged by the Fifth Dalai Lama later. It lies 8 kilometers west of Lhasa under Mt. Gambo Utse. Its name means Rice Heap in Tibetan. The monastery covers a floor space of more than 200 thousand...

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  • Potala Palace

    The Potala Palace is the symbol of Lhasa and Tibet and the golden roof and white walls of this 1,000 room palace and fortress stand proudly above the ancient streets of old Lhasa. It is the grandest example of Tibetan architecture and was first built in the 7th century by King Songtsan Gambo (617-650). Most of the present building was constructed...

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  • Tibetan national flag

    The Tibetan National Flag is outlawed in the TAR (Tibetan Autonomous Region). The flag in the picture was not flying over Tibet but on the Dam in Amsterdam during a demonstration for a free Tibet.The 13th Dalai Lama (1875-1933) designed the flag based on the formats of previous Tibetan military flags. The flag:In the centre stands a snow capped...

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  • curious

    The people of Tibet are very curious. Whenever our bus stopped they came out of nowhere and started looking into the bus, what is in there? Who are those strange looking people?No matter where we stopped, even if there was no house or nomad tent in sight, within minutes there were Tibetans around.

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  • People

    The people of Tibet look like people of the Andes region in south america. Is it because of the altitude? We don't know. Probably the clothes give that impression too.Tibetans do look very different from the Han chinese (90% of the chinese population is Han). One of the striking differences are the red cheeks, like they are blushing constantly, you...

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  • Work is equally divided between man and...

    In this picture you see a clear example of how work is equally divided between man and woman. While the husband is standing on the roof of his truck, giving instructions, the woman is carrying the things to him on her back. In this case it is the matras, but there will be much, much more, untill the entire campingequipment is in or on the truck.

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  • travelling family

    This family is traveling to a religious festival near the Zhigung Monastery. They packed everything on the small tractor, the only means of transportation they have. They packed their tents, their cooking pots, the Yak dung to cook on, the food, and all the family members. Believe it or not but after this short stop to eat something they all get on...

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  • the Yak and its products

    The yak is one of the most important domesticated animals in Tibet. You encounter the Yak on the grassy plains where they are grazing. The nomads lead the herds to places where the grass is best in summer. The Yak is everything to the nomads it provides transportation, meat and milk. The long dark hair is used to make the traditional tents of the...

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  • the strong tibetans

    Tibetans are really strong people. They can carry a heavy load even up the mountains.For us it was hard to climb the stairs to the restaurant located at the second floor......

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  • Yak butter tea

    One of the most famous drinks of tibet is the Yak butter tea. It is a dark smokey tea, with a large lumb of Yak butter in it. It tastes salty, like clear soup. It is supposed to warm you and the fat is nourishing.In case you are not sure weather you like this you can always order a beer, like this Lhasa beer, to wash it away...

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  • when you got to go, you just go

    As said before not many tibetans have privat bathrooms or toilets. The public toilets cost money, so when you got to go.......Urinating in the streets seems to be very normal. We saw monks walking in front of us, kneeling down, pulling in their robes for a few centimeters and the sound of a small waterfall was filling the air. Ofcourse not...

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  • no bathrooms

    As most Tibetan houses have no privat bathrooms you will see people brushing their teeth on the street in the gutter.Most houses don't have toilets too, they use the public toilets. Public toilets in Tibet mostly charge you 2 jiao (2 eurocent). Most of them smell terrible but in general they are clean holes in the ground. Most of the time there is...

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  • Begging

    You will see many people begging in Tibet. But it is not always good to give money. You encourage people to beg, because it is worth the trouble. In Lhasa we saw children begging, and in the next street they had to give the money to an older guy........ It looked like they were send out to get money for him.When monks are sitting there, chanting...

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  • A loving family

    If you head into the smoky tea houses of Lhasa you might just find some friends. Very few travellers enterr these denizons but it is the best way to meet people, and drink chai We met this family twice and chatted at a teahouse and visited a festival with them. The little girl is very smart and the father (although unemployed) speaks perfect...

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  • Are you expert in Tibetan Buddhism? ...

    Like many visitors, I brought little real knowledge of the country with me to Tibet. I had read portions of my several guidebooks but found much of what I read difficult to assimilate while sitting in Chicago. For instance, although I knew Tibet is a Buddhist country, my knowledge of Buddhism was minimal. I had always thought of Buddhism as a...

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  • You've never seen so many road crews in...

    Road construction and maintenance is a regular feature of modern Tibetan life. There are an extraordinary number of people--children as well as women and men-- engaged in road work. For the most part, the crews fill holes with gravel, build up soft shoulders, or level badly worn roads. But the numbers are astonishing. Tibet must have a higher rate...

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  • Walking the Kora

    I love to walk the Kora (pilgrimage circuit around religious objects), together with the colourful and devoted pilgrims, who come from the rural parts of Tibet to complete the circuit. These religious objects can be anything, a shrine, a place where the Dalai Lama has been, even a mountain or a lake.The busiest Koras are certainly in Lhasa around...

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  • Get your Individual Permit for...

    While in Lhasa it was impossible to obtain an individual permit for travelling overland to Nepal, in Shigatse, however, it was given quite easy. Travel by bus to Shigatse and enquire at the local PSB! If you want to make sidetrips to Sakya and EBC, you should have it stated separately. Travelling individual along the Friendship Highway from Lhasa...

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  • Monks Debating !!???!!

    Whilst visiting one of the Monasteries just outside of Lhasa I heard this incredible noise !!?? Shouting and Clapping and even more Shouting !!?? I thought surely the Monk's can't be fighting amongst themselves ?? so off I went to investigate and what I encountered was my Fondest Memory of Tibet !!The Monks were Debating, Buddhism isn't written in...

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