Lhasa Favorites

  • Favorites
    by wonga0
  • Lhasa Bank of China ATM
    Lhasa Bank of China ATM
    by MikeySoft
  • Just another yak
    Just another yak
    by Confucius

Most Recent Favorites in Lhasa

  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    For help with altitude sickness...

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jun 19, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In reference to your question concerning altitude sickness. Have have taken Diamox many times and it does seem to work somewhat. But I would only take this if other remedies do not work. First, be sure to start hydrating at least two days before arriving in Lhasa. When you think you can't drink anymore water...drink some more. Be sure to eat foods that will replace your electrolytes (sodium, potassium, etc...) as to avoid hyponatremia. I also found that sucking on ginseng root was more effective than the Diamox. I've also heard that the older you get the affects of altitude are not as severe.

    Hope this helps and good luck!!

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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  • mavl's Profile Photo

    INTERNET CAFE AT SNOWLANDS HOTEL

    by mavl Updated Nov 7, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: snowlands hotel along mentsikhang lam is just around the corner from the barkhor. just inside its gate (on the left side after the reception area) is an internet cafe with good rates (Y5/hr) and a friendly and accommodating proprietor named nga. he'll gladly make sure you get everything you'll need to go online. they are open until very late at night.

    Fondest memory: it was always great to see different kinds of people from all over the world hunched over the computers inside this internet cafe. when passing by (i wasn't peeking!), you'll just be able to notice that practically everone is logged onto yahoo - thing is, each computer has the yahoo homepage in a different language! amazing!

    i just found this so cool. here we are at the top of the world and everybody is reporting back to their corner of the globe in their respective languages - and i'm sure we're all saying the same thing, tibet is awesome!

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  • Be Prepared for the Public Toilets

    by ANorcaltraveler Written Oct 6, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I had not expected, to see the sad state of public toilets at the tourist spots (monasteries), in particular at the Potala Palace. However they are more or less the same everywhere, basically a hole in the ground or possibly a trough. I would advise that you bring your own toilet paper and prepare to hold your breath!

    One pleasant surprise, at the viewing spot at Yamdrok Lake, they are in the process of installing new (modern sit-down) toilets (actually I don't believe there are any toileting facilities, there, at present).

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  • mavl's Profile Photo

    BULLETINBOARDS/CORKBOARDS

    by mavl Written Feb 8, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: if you're looking for things to do and/or people to do them with while in lhasa, check out the bulletinboards/corkboards at the lobby of hotels and guesthouses - these will almost always contain posted notes from other travelers looking for companions to complete a tour group (which will inevitably make the tour cheaper for them and you if you join).

    they will also contain tour offers from local tour companies and guides - the informal kind anyway.

    they may even contain notices of items for sale such as used backpacks, hiking boots, etc.

    whatever the case, these boards are worth checking out. it's a good way of getting info that might turn out to be valuable.

    the board in the photo is from the lobby of snowlands hotel, just a few establishments down from the barkhor along mentsikhang lam road.

    Fondest memory: it may also contain a lot of funny stuff! i remember one note looking for a left hiking sandal, size 9 - just the left! hope for the guy's sake that he found it!

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  • MikeySoft's Profile Photo

    ATMs

    by MikeySoft Updated Nov 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lhasa Bank of China ATM

    Favorite thing: I used the ATM at the bank of china. It is just a little west of the potala palace. The ATM is inside the bank so the bank needs to be open. I don't know if they have one outside.

    They say a Bank of China ATM is on the east side of the potala square on khamadong lam (kangang donglu) but I never found it.

    If you use a US debit card, you should call your bank before you leave to let them know you will be using it overseas. Otherwise, they may not allow you to use it in China. The same for credit cards.

    Please rate this and my other tips when you find them useful.

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  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Photos: Should we ask permission from Tibetans?

    by Confucius Updated Oct 2, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I got this lady while she was praying; easy prey??
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: Go ahead, try it! Ask permission to photograph a Tibetan and you'll get one of three responses: "Yes", "No", and "Money". What you won't get is their natural expression, so my advice is to just take photos and not worry about any formalities.

    I took pictures of topless Tibetan women bathing in the Lhasa River and monks in the midst of prayer, however I was careful to take only tasteful portraits that I would not hesitate to show my mum. Only once did I succumb to the begging hand of a Tibetan who sought payment for her picture. I got so many good portrait shots at Barkhor Bazaar that I resisted the urge to photograph Tibetans who sat near me on a public bus or who I encountered during other non-tourist activities. (See my Barkhor Bazaar travelogue for more photo tips)

    Fondest memory: One of my favorite photos is of this old Tibetan woman at Sera Monastery. You will see elderly people in Tibet who look like they are 100 years old. I like how she has her hair in long braids and the look of devotion on her face during prayer. There was no way I was going to ask permission to take this photo, but I think Tibetans in Lhasa are used to tourists taking their photos. She ignored my presence, and I got this great photo as a result.

    Of course not all Tibetans will ignore you. The ones who walk by you in front of the Potala might ask for money, but I also saw Tibetans who cheerfully posed with tourists there without any request to be paid. Use your best judgement and try to avoid the money trap. I think there are enough Tibetans who don't mind being photographed and when you combine this lot with those who aren't even aware that you zoomed in for their portrait then you'll have plenty of pictures for your collection.

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  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Yak Yak Yak Yak Yak!

    by Confucius Written Sep 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My very first yak!  I was so excited to see it too
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: In Tibet, you're going to see yaks everywhere. Yak butter, yak cheese, yak horn ornaments ("hornaments?"), yak sacks (wool bags) and even yak T-shirts all remind you of that animal which you actually got excited about when seeing it for the first time from the train window.

    In Lhasa restaurants, the word beef (niu rou) means "yak meat" whether you're in a Tibetan, Sichuan, or Shanghai style restaurant. It's nearly impossible to get ordinary cow meat, what people outside of Tibet normally consider as "beef" in Lhasa.

    If you get tired of yak meat, there are plenty of non-Tibetan restaurants in Lhasa but unfortunately the overwhelming majority of these are Sichuan style. So if you don't like spicy food then there are only a few choices left. I ended up going to the same "Hangzhou Xiao Long Bao" cafe every night over on Beijing Zhong Lu because I could not find any other decent alternatives for dinner.

    Fondest memory: One of my fondest memories of Lhasa was enjoying the traditional "yak dance", a performance by two Tibetan boys inside of a yak costume which is often done when greeting guests. (see additional photo)

    Related to:
    • Farm Stay
    • Food and Dining

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  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Budweiser, the Tibetan king of beers in Lhasa

    by Confucius Updated Sep 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Budweiser welcomes you to Lhasa!
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: One way to amuse yourself during a bus tour of Lhasa is by counting the number of Budweiser signs. The American beer company sponsors signs for restaurants and bars in Lhasa, so you'll see Budweiser's logo everywhere in town including a big billboard behind the huge bronze yak statue on Beijing Boulevard.
    I also saw an outdoor "Hall of Budweiser" at the Dalai Lama's summer palace (Norbulinka), perhaps used for wedding parties and other cheerful gatherings.

    Fondest memory: ********************************
    In Lhasa the lamas say "Cheers"
    when they drink their Budweiser beers
    One might mistake monks
    for mischievous punks
    when burps are all a tourist hears!
    ********************************

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Trains

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  • grets's Profile Photo

    A model for a day

    by grets Written Oct 29, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Many Chinese pilgrims, like the Tibetans from remote villages, had never seen westerners before, and would nudge each other, point and giggle. The braver souls would actually ask to take your photograph. We spent a long time with this Chinese family, chatting (in two different languages – anything is possible with sign language) and taking group photos. A lot of fun was had by all.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • grets's Profile Photo

    Pilrims in the mist

    by grets Written Oct 29, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pilrims in the mist
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: It is really worth visiting the Barkhor Square first thing in the morning, the atmosphere really is magical! There are many more pilgrims than any other time of day, and also many of the devotees will light fires in specially constructed ovens in order to create a misty effect. And the result is surreal. It has to be seen to be believed.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • grets's Profile Photo

    A room with a view!

    by grets Written Oct 29, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View from our bedroom window

    Favorite thing: As we settled into the room, David called me over to the window and said: “come and have a look at the view Grete”. There, looming over the city like a wedding cake was the Potala Palace! To say I became emotional is an understatement. I didn’t just well up, I cried. I sobbed. I became so overwhelmed by emotions relating to this wonderful piece of architecture with such poignant history, that I couldn’t control myself. I wept for several minutes, and every time we went back to the room, I would be drawn towards the window and this magnificent view, and every time I would feel overwhelmed by emotions. I have wanted to see the Potala Palace for so long, and the final ‘pilgrimage’ if you like, was just so incredibly powerful!

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Rainy season

    by tompt Written Sep 6, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    rainclowds over the Jokhang

    Favorite thing: When you visit Lhasa in july or august you can expect some rain, as it is the rainy season in that period. We had rain every day in july 2004, but almost always only at the end of the day. So if you go sightseeing always take you umbrella and/or raincoat.

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    The old tibetan part of Lhasa

    by tompt Written Sep 6, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A typical tibetan building

    Favorite thing: Lhasa has two different parts of the city. Most of the must see things like the Barkhor and the Jokhang are in the Tibetan part of town. The Tibetan part is the eastern part and can be recognised by its colorful houses.

    The chinese (western) part has the more expensive hotels.

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  • Andrew_Vodo's Profile Photo

    Tibetan quarter

    by Andrew_Vodo Updated Feb 5, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The city now is divided in two parts - the chinese and tibetan one. You can see the Tibetan quarter on the picture. This is the typical tibetan building. You can see the black squares around the windows. Ususally there are small red and yellow curtains on them. These colours symbolize three main gods of Tibet: Yellow - Avalokitesvara, the god of compassion, Read - Manjushri, the god of wisdom, and Black - the protective deity, I think, Yamantaka (I can be wrong :))

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • Andrew_Vodo's Profile Photo

    Norbu Lingka Palace and gardens

    by Andrew_Vodo Updated Jan 30, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is the summer residence of Dalay Lama. It is not as interesting as Potala, but worth of visiting. When Dalay Lama lived here, he liked to feed fish in this pond. He took the piece of bread and went to the pond. when he moved, the fish heard the steps of Dalay Lama and followed him around the pond.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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