Lhasa Transportation

  • Transportation
    by blueskyjohn
  • Transportation
    by blueskyjohn
  • Transportation
    by blueskyjohn

Best Rated Transportation in Lhasa

  • mavl's Profile Photo

    NICE YOUNG TIBETAN GUIDE WHO SPEAKS ENGLISH

    by mavl Updated Sep 21, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    if you want a nice young guy who speaks english to take you around tibet, you can get in touch with nga wang. he was my guide during my solo tour around lhasa/gyangze/xigaze/nam-tso last august, 2006. he's very helpful and will take good photographs of you! (in case you're also traveling alone).

    he can also arrange your transportation and driver. we took an isuzu rodeo 4x4.

    just tell him you were referred by miko, his friend from the philippines.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Lhasa Train Station

    by Confucius Written Sep 23, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is Lhasa train station about noon on a Friday
    1 more image

    I was amazed by how easy it is to buy a train ticket at Lhasa station. It only look about a total of 5 minutes for me to go into the station on a Friday afternoon and purchase a ticket to Golmud.
    When I got to the ticket counter there was only one person in front of me. Where were the long lines? What about the bureaucracy?
    I was told that buying a ticket to Beijing or Chengdu required advance reservations. Yet since I only wanted a cheap hard seat to Golmud, the tickets were in abundance for my Sunday departure.

    It is possible to buy tickets to Dangxiong or Naqu if you want to see a couple more destinations in Tibet. Dangxiong is the station near Nam-tso Lake and Naqu is famous for its horse racing festival. These tickets are very cheap but you'll need to stay overnight in order to proceed to Golmud or return to Lhasa. In the near future I believe day trip packages to Nam-tso Lake will become available.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Trains
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    Lhasa Airport

    by Confucius Updated Sep 25, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Lhasa's airport is not in Lhasa. It's actually located in the small town of Gongga, about an hour away by bus. There is only one international flight, so if you are not going to Nepal then you must fly to another domestic destination and change planes.
    If you need to use the restroom, there is only one western style toilet in the airport and it's located next to "International Departures" on the far right as you enter the airport.

    There is plenty of transportation to Lhasa from the airport, but if you fly into Gongga and wish to go elsewhere in Tibet then options are very limited. There is a road that goes to Gyangze (highway 307) but it is constantly under repair. For 10 yuan you can get dropped off by the Lhasa shuttle at the nearby intersection that goes west to Shigatse (spelled as "Xigaze" in VT database) and then hitch a ride on a mini-bus for 40 or 50 yuan. (See additional photo)

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Air China to Lhasa

    by mim95 Updated May 29, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Minutes before landing at Lhasa

    I flew with Air China into Lhasa from Chengdu, a city in the western province of Sichuan. For most people, you'll need to get an illusive permit*, which can be arranged at the local guesthouses in Chengdu. I said illusive coz I never saw the permit. The flight was early in the morning, and the guesthouse had arranged transportation, which was included in the price of the ticket and permit. There is no other way to get to the airport this early, except for taxi.

    The two hours flight was very smooth, and passed by numerous barren mountains, with the occational villages and green farms along the rivers.

    You can't get discounts for this trip, which is about 1600RMB one way. [July 2005 price]

    *May 2007 Update: I read that there is in fact a real permit. When I was there in 2005, none of the travelers that I met had one.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Public Bus

    by mim95 Updated Dec 19, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Public Bus in Lhasa

    Public buses are good way to get around within Lhasa and to nearby monasteries. It is 2RMB within the city, and more to further away. The buses are actually mini-buses and are quite frequent. There are various routes, it is better to ask at your guesthouse which one and where to take beforehand.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    The Great Lhasa Bridge

    by Confucius Written Sep 23, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here's the bridge into town from the train station
    3 more images

    You probably won't walk across it but the Lhasa Bridge is used frequently by vehicles arriving in Lhasa from the train station. Further west there is a new bridge currently under construction in 2006 that will provide a shortcut to town from the train station. The old bridge will still be used by vehicles travelling east to Sichuan.

    The area surrounding the Lhasa Bridge is an ideal place to observe the Bathing Festival, which is usually celebrated some time in September. Use the west gate of Tibet University to access the bridge area, as the road from town leading up to the bridge does not have a suitable sidewalk for pedestrian traffic.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Trains
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    Taxi - the affordable way to go

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 5, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Taxi's are very affordable in my opinion. The cost is 10 rmb and will get you just about anywhere in Lhasa. You do not have to tip your driver. They are not expecting anything. The ones I've used seem to be very knowledgeable on the area. They do not speak much English but they are familiar with tourist destinations. Where you may run into a problem is if you want to go to a specific restaurant. Just ask your hotel staff to write it out in Chinese.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Uphill to Drepung Monastery

    by tompt Written Sep 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This little tractor will take you uphill to the Drepung Monastery. From the road where the regular bus from Lhasa stops.
    Ofcourse you can walk uphill, but it is a tough climb and once inside the monastery gate, you can climb also. The 1 Yuan they charge to take you (up or down hill) is worth it.

    Was this review helpful?

  • sugarpuff's Profile Photo

    From Lhasa airport to downtown

    by sugarpuff Updated Oct 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's one of the those photos that you take a million of at the time and then when you sort through them afterwards you realise that they all look the same! The scenery was beautiful however as we passed by the Lhasa River. At first we passed through the Yalung Zangbo Valley from the airport whose Indian name is Dhamaputara, and then through the newly constructed 3km long tunnel called Galashan which the guide was very proud of. The tunnel has actually cut the journey from around 93km to 60km, so that was the part that I was pleased to hear about! At the other end we went through the Lhasa Valley, passing the Lhasa River where I took this photo.

    Was this review helpful?

  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Flying into Lhasa ? take it easy......

    by tompt Written Sep 6, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    An airplane at Lhasa airport

    If you fly into Lhasa, which most visitors in Tibet do, be sure you take it easy the first days. Due to the altitude of Lhasa (3595 meters), a lack of oxygen, can make you ill. Symptoms of this altitude-sickness range from light dizziness, headaches to the more serious like vomiting and unconsciousness. Mostly these symptoms will go away after a few days, if they don't go to a lower altitude....
    You can take some light painkillers for the headache, but it is wise to rest a lot. Further more it is said you have to drink a lot.
    Best to avoid this problems is to climb very slowly and stay some time at lower altitudes before you go to 4000 meters.
    Most visitors however do fly into Lhasa...... which is OK if you take it easy the first days.

    Was this review helpful?

  • sugarpuff's Profile Photo

    From Lhasa to Tsetang

    by sugarpuff Written Oct 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was a 3.5 hour journey, so plenty of photos to take! Again, each one looked just like the other 20 or so, but I did manage to get some good ones of prayer flags dotted along the way! What did amaze me was that there were really dry mountains, mountains with foliage and mountains with sand...all different kinds. Our guide said that there were only two kinds of trees which grow in Lhasa, those being the Birch which is used for wooden carvings and the Willow which is used for the rooves of the Tibetan's houses.

    Was this review helpful?

  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    Lhasa to Shigatse by train

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 4, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    There is a railway under construction that will connect to the Qinghai-Tibet Railway. This section will continue onto Shigatse. This would mean that if you do not plan on venturing outside of Shigatse, you will not have to drive from Lhasa. Cutting out those annoying checkpoints.

    The construction is reported to be complete by October of 2013.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Adventure Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sugarpuff's Profile Photo

    We stopped along the way...

    by sugarpuff Updated Oct 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ...but where it was is another matter!!! I really cant remember what the purpose of this Buddha here in the mountain side is, but I do remember the guide saying that the land used to be owned by the government and it was therefore free to get in and take photos, but recently it has been bought by a wealthy businessman and there is now a fee of 10yuan to walk inside, hence my photo from the side of the road. Nice billboard! At least the advertisers were clever enough to realise that people would be taking photos of it even if they didnt want to be! All the white 'rubbish' strewn on the mountain side are haddas put there by pilgrims and travellers. I should have probably put mine there as it kept getting caught on my bag zip, but then I would have had to pay 10yuan just to put it there..a vicious cycle!

    Was this review helpful?

  • budapest8's Profile Photo

    Sketch map of Lhasa

    by budapest8 Updated Sep 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sketch map of Lhasa

    Since I was there in 1986 there have sprung up lots more hotels and I stayed in the Lhasa Hotel just as it had been built. The lifts didn't yet work and they were still laying carpets. Due to the restrictions then tourists were only allowed to stay in certain hotels or guesthouses. We walked everywhere or drove around in the Toyota Land Cruiser we rented which was pretty expensive but we split it 4 ways for our trip to the Nepalese border. I was in Lhasa 4 times and there exist 3 groups of seperate people.The Tibetans, The Han Chinese and tourists.
    Roads

    Roads are generally poor in Tibet. The only roads suitable for VTT are the following=

    Kodari Dingri Shigatse Lhasa Nakchu
    Shigatse Gyantse
    Lhasa Kongpo-Gyamda Bayi
    Lhasa Tsetang Ombulakang.
    Schedule only 50 to 100km depending you have to climb or not. For other roads 35km a day will be a maximum. Excepts those 4 main roads there are short good portions of roads around some large cities, military camps or hydroelectric plants and between Chamdo and Chamdo airport. Others roads are bumpy and only an average of 200km per day can be expected with a first class TOYOTA 4500 on those roads. Many are under repairs or cut such as the Chonggye road. A side track nearby will replace the usual road. It don't matter: any 4 wheels carriage track worth those roads.
    When looking the materials and technics used - no progress can be scheduled in the near future. Chinese wasted 40 years to learn that roads should be drained and it will take certainly more than that to discover that local soils must not be used as a bottom of road.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • sugarpuff's Profile Photo

    Shigatse to Lhasa

    by sugarpuff Written Oct 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We had been so so lucky during the whole week holiday and hadn't encountered any rain when we had been visiting places. We had had some rain one night but we were already back in the hotel by that point. So on our penultimate day on the road from Shigatse to Lhasa we managed to see mountains with clouds hanging over them and I really thought it was a spectacular sight.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Lhasa

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

87 travelers online now

Comments

Lhasa Transportation

blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

There are two main ways to get to Lhasa, either by plane or by train.  Of course a flight will be more expensive.  While the train is cheaper, it does take considerable time to and from...

View all Lhasa hotels