Kashgar Things to Do

  • Id Kah Mosque
    Id Kah Mosque
    by John195123
  • Old Town of Kashgar
    Old Town of Kashgar
    by nepalgoods
  • 2007
    2007
    by nepalgoods

Most Recent Things to Do in Kashgar

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    Idakh Mosque

    by SallyM Written Aug 4, 2007

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    This is the largest mosque in China, and can accommodate 10,000 worshippers.

    It was built in 1442 and is located in the central square. Unfortunately, the powers-that-be have recently installed a giant video screen in the square, the noise from which can spoil the atmosphere a bit.

    Idakh Mosque, Kashgar Ceiling detail, Idakh Mosque
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    Lake Karakul

    by SallyM Written Aug 3, 2007

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    Take a drive up the Karakoram Highway to Lake Karakul, and bring plenty of film/memory for your camera. You will also need your passport, as there is a Chinese checkpoint on the road.

    When you reach the lake, 3,500 metres above sea level, you can walk or take a horse or camel ride around the lake, or simply admire the stunning scenery.

    Lake Karakul
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    Sunday Bazaar

    by SallyM Written Aug 3, 2007

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    Everyone who comes to Kashgar has heard of the famous Sunday bazaar. The animal market is a little way out of town. There are sections for the different animals, but it is not just for animal sales. There are food vendors, barbers, and smiths who rig donkeys up in a strange contraption before replacing their shoes.

    You will see quite a few tourists prowling around taking photos, but the market is still for the locals - you won't find souvenir stalls.

    The main bazaar in the city is rather less interesting, but if you wish you can buy all sorts things including a wide variety of local hats, artificial trees, hair dye, men's socks and raisins. And there is a carpet emporium.

    Donkey at Sunday Bazaar, Kashgar Donkey being re-shod
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    Tomb of Abakh Khoja

    by SallyM Written Jul 31, 2007

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    Abakh Khoja was a 17th century ruler of Kashgar, and leader of the 'White Hat' sect of Islam. His tomb is regarded as a very holy place. It is decorated with multi-coloured tiles.

    At this site is the tomb building itself, inside which are the tombs of Khoja himself, and members of his family, all covered in colourful cloths and two mosques.

    In the courtyard of the larger mosque is a tree which is supposed to bring luck, if you walk around it three times clockwise. I can't say that I tried it myself, but our local guide insisted that it works.

    Tomb of Abakh Khoja
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  • uygurguide's Profile Photo

    old town

    by uygurguide Written Sep 8, 2006

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    The town has a history of over 2,000 years. It was said that Banchao, Eastern Han’s envoy to the Western Region once stayed here on his way. It was a summer palace during the Kalahan Dynasty.
    The town is located at a precipitous position with mud-thatched buildings densely built one atop another. Numerous small lanes crisscross the town and reach every corner of it. inside the town, are those hundreds-year-old, most of which are two or three-storyed simple architecture. Usually, each house is equipped with a staircase leads to the building top .
    Each house has a courtyard, some big and some small, the size of which is due to the terrain. Similarly, all the yards grow the Muslim-favored trees and flowers, such as mulberry, figs, megranate, almond, grape, rose, China rose. The yards are heavily shaded, proving a tranquil environment for relaxing and refreshing. Inside bigger yards, the owner even built up a pergola for grape vines.

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    old houses in the Old town

    by uygurguide Written Sep 8, 2006

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    The town has a history of over 2,000 years. It was said that Banchao, Eastern Han’s envoy to the Western Region once stayed here on his way. It was a summer palace during the Kalahan Dynasty.
    The town is located at a precipitous position with mud-thatched buildings densely built one atop another. Numerous small lanes crisscross the town and reach every corner of it. inside the town, are those hundreds-year-old, most of which are two or three-storyed simple architecture. Usually, each house is equipped with a staircase leads to the building top .
    Each house has a courtyard, some big and some small, the size of which is due to the terrain. Similarly, all the yards grow the Muslim-favored trees and flowers, such as mulberry, figs, megranate, almond, grape, rose, China rose. The yards are heavily shaded, proving a tranquil environment for relaxing and refreshing. Inside bigger yards, the owner even built up a pergola for grape vines.

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  • Beefy_SAFC's Profile Photo

    Kashgar

    by Beefy_SAFC Updated Jul 8, 2006

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    Kashgar ('Kashi') is home to one of the largest livestock markets in Asia, held to the east of town every Sunday. Just about everything on two and four legs is sold here, including cows, sheep and goats, meant for the dinner table (yes, they can get slaughtered in situ - I was tempted to put 'before' & 'after' shots here, but there are children reading this). Horses, donkeys and camels for transport purposes are also sold here and it's possible to see them test ridden if you're here at the right time, however, getting in the way is not advised unless you want to get trampled all over by a horse being ridden at full speed.

    Other goods also get sold and a great deal of innovation is used, such as water troughs made out of rubber tyres. Back in Kashgar is one of the largest clothing and household goods market I think I've ever seen. Almost everything is bought and sold, including the famous local knifeware from around the Tarim Basin and enough skull caps to seemingly stretch all the way along the old Silk Road.

    Kashgar was traditionally one of the major trading places along the old Silk Road from Xi'an via the Tarim Basin and places further west such as Samarkand and Bukhara (see my 'Uzbekistan' information page for more info.) to Antioch (Turkey), where goods from east and west were traded.

    Islam is the one thing that truly gives the Uygyr a separate identity to the Han Chinese and even though the young seem to be less devout than their elders (some even enjoying alcohol and a more western style of life - women & men mixing in everyday life unlike the past), it still influences most aspects of Uygyr life from dress to diet (pork is a no-no and mutton is king). It's influence here is still strong enough at the end of Ramadan to fill Id Kah Mosque on Friday, plus the square outside and some of the surrounding streets - the mosque is not big enough to cope for this key Muslim festival. That is despite the mosque and it's grounds making this the biggest place of Islamic worship in Central Asia.

    Nan bread Uygyr men Kashgar Sunday Market Id Kah Mosque
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    Kashgar Sunday Market

    by janner5 Written Mar 12, 2006

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    This is a cattle and produce market that is one of the famous stopping points on the Silk Route. Great atmosphere allowing you to watch the various local groups interacting, bargaining, butchering, cooking, shearing etc.
    This part of the market seems to have been moved by the authorities from the central location to a less atmospheric place. The non-agricultural items are now in a new covered market area in town.

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    Kashgar Sunday Market

    by janner5 Written Mar 12, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a cattle and produce market that is one of the famous stopping points on the Silk Route. Great atmosphere allowing you to watch the various local groups interacting, bargaining, butchering, cooking, shearing etc.
    This part of the market seems to have been moved by the authorities from the central location to a less atmospheric place. The non-agricultural items are now in a new covered market area in town.

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  • l_joo's Profile Photo

    One for you

    by l_joo Written Jan 10, 2005

    Picture is a local woman with their common daily head veil of dark brown color. This kind of head veil is wool knitted from my viewpoint, when it covers your face, your eyes can still see the street but peoples can't see your face and won't recognise who you are. I saw some 3 out of 10 women of Uyghurs covering like this on streets. To me, not easy to capture a front shot for you, I'm always too shy to snap front photos, regret.

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    Street performers

    by l_joo Written Jan 10, 2005

    Picture is a blind man performing traditional Er-Hu. From what I know, Blind peoples can play Er-Hu very well, its their traditional living skills, as shown in some Chinese movies I watched. This young man is playing Er-Hu on the bustling street of Kashgar, in the big food street where vendors selling mostly meats....

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  • dipendra's Profile Photo

    Old city

    by dipendra Written Nov 23, 2004

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    Just next to the Mosque, u can take a walk around the old city, that's a real local life. again, my poor English. lots of shops, like hair cut, dential clinic, hand made boots, snacks, nuts, fruits.

    it's worth visiting, that's all i can say.

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  • Madmaxola's Profile Photo

    Id Kah Mosque

    by Madmaxola Written Feb 11, 2004

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    The Largest mosque in Kashgar, and probably china. Simplly designed and very functional, the Id Kah mosque is smack in the middle of town. You can go in to visit and even enter the prayer hall, as long as you take off your shoes. The entrance fee is 10 yuan (about $1.25), and it's an interesting half hour or so.

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    Kashgar streets

    by Madmaxola Written Feb 11, 2004

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    The best thing about Kashgar is it is probably one of the most preserved still 'living' medieval cities. When you walk around the mud-brick and timber Uyghur houses/neighborhoods, you really get a feeling like you're still in the 14th century. It's like living time-travel.

    kashgar bakery

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    KASHGAR : SUNDAY BAZAAR

    by swesn Written Dec 4, 2003

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    This is one of the OLDEST AND MOST COLOURFUL AND LIVELY bazaars in Asia and is not to be missed. This happens every Sunday and the area around the market swells up with tens of thousands of villagers coming to buy and sell.

    There are pedestrians, horse and donkey carts, trucks, bicycles milling around. Inside and outside the covered market, everything that can be sold are sold here, rugs, blankets, boots, hats, bicycle parts, household wares. Food stalls and refreshment stalls selling vanilla ice-cream and yoghurt drinks are also available.

    The immense livestock market selling horses, oxen, goats, etc… is also something to behold and you need to take a taxi there as it is no longer located next to the Sunday Bazaar.

    Basket of melons, sir?

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Kashgar Things to Do

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