Tutuala Travel Guide

  • Tutuala Church
    Tutuala Church
    by DSwede
  • Tutuala Village
    Tutuala Village
    by DSwede
  • Looking towards Jaco Island
    Looking towards Jaco Island
    by DSwede

Tutuala Things to Do

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    by DSwede Written Mar 18, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Leneara Caves and the Ilikerekere Caves are well hidden in the jungle overgrowth. There are no sign posts, nor trail head markers, therefore you must hire a local guide. You may negotiate this from anywhere between $7 and $20 depending on your bartering skills.

    The caves are formidable in size and offer many ancient petroglyphs dating back thousands of years. Many foreign studies are on going into these caves to document and investigate the relatively new finds.

    Some stories also tell about how the militants sought refuge in the caves during the Independence struggles and even dating back to WWII.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    by DSwede Updated Mar 18, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jaco Island is a very small, uninhabited island about 600m off the extreme eastern point of Tutuala. It is uninhabited since it is held as a sacred land by the locals.

    The waters are pristine and the sand is among the best I've squeezed between my toes. Although people are not allowed to live on the island, there are no reasons that stop visitors from enjoying it as a day trip. The island is also a respected place for birdwatching.

    Again, like most things in Timor, there are no facilities. You must bring everything that you need with you. Towels, sunscreen, food, drink, snorkel & fins, etc.

    To get here, you must get down a rather bumpy dirt road for about 13km past Tutuala. Any local can point the way, but if you are in the town, there is a main "Y" intersection. The road down and left will take you Jaco. The road up and right will return you towards Los Palos.

    After going down the 13km rock/gravel/dirt road, you will be dropped directly to the beach. Take a right, park your car or in my case, bike, and get a fisherman. For about $10, a fisherman will take you to/from the island. If you're fortunate, you may be able to get him to catch you a fresh meal too!

    Looking towards Jaco Island
    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Beaches
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tutuala Hotels

    0 Hotels in Tutuala

Tutuala Local Customs

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    by DSwede Written Mar 18, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These style homes, known as Dong Son, are found only in the eastern-most Tutuala District.

    These structures are very tall, elongated from the base on stilts. There are some more popular ones along the main roads, however the smaller villages and side roads will have examples too. Just keep your eyes open.

    They are odd looking, being much more tall than they are wide. These are a prime example of ancestral ties to parts of northern Vietnam, where the Dong Son people came from.

    One of the villagers explained to me that there are some variations in the structures. In present times, maybe only a few people still live in them, but long ago they were both home and barn.

    Today, the majority of them are simple reminders of their culture, but still serve a practical purpose as storage of dry goods and livestock supplies.

    Dong Son-style houses
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Tutuala Favorites

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    by DSwede Updated Apr 13, 2010

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Tutuala does not have the modern conveniences of most towns.

    Water:
    There is no running water in the entire village. The installation of plumbing and bathroom fixtures in the Pousada de Tutuala was simply done in anticipation of when running water may grace the town. All of the villagers must walk down to the base of the hill about 1.5km away and bring water back.

    Was this review helpful?

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    by DSwede Written Mar 18, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Tutuala does not have the modern conveniences of most towns.

    Electricity:
    Power is not generally available in town. There is no connection to the national supply grid, so any place that has it is tapped into a generator's output. The UN office has power, as do some of the affluent villagers, the Pousada de Tutuala and possibly some of the community buildings. However this is only available from about 7pm to 6am.

    I recommend bring a flashlight and extra batteries for your camera or electronics.

    Was this review helpful?

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    by DSwede Written Mar 18, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Tutuala does not have the modern conveniences of most towns.

    Telephone:
    There are no telephones in town. You must travel about 10km minimum to get a cellular phone signal. Alternatively some of the locals joke that you can hike a 2km nearby mountain and at the top, you can get signal.

    Unless you have a satellite phone, there is no communication via telephone or emails.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Tutuala

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

89 travelers online now

Comments

Tutuala Travel Guide
Map of Tutuala

View all Tutuala hotels