Hong Kong Island Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by hassan_abu
  • The view back to Central from the ferry
    The view back to Central from the ferry
    by rudysmom626
  • Fellow Star Ferry passing, heading to Central
    Fellow Star Ferry passing, heading to...
    by rudysmom626

Most Recent Things to Do in Hong Kong Island

  • hassan_abu's Profile Photo

    Shopping at Mid Levels and Soho

    by hassan_abu Written Jun 8, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shop, shop and more shop.
    Here at Soho seems to be the expats favourite.
    Just in case you are wondering what Soho stands for, it means South of Hollywood.
    Wikipedia has statated that The Central–Mid-levels escalators the longest outdoor covered escalator system in the world which covers over 800 metres in distance and elevates over 135 metres from bottom to top. Constructed in 1993 it links Central and Western District on Hong Kong Island.
    The escalator daily runs downhill from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. and uphill from 10:30am to midnight.

    Mid levels escalator Central Central
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • ozpaul's Profile Photo

    Visit the Big Buddha

    by ozpaul Written Jan 2, 2012

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We went on a tour which took us to the Big Buddha. The cable car ride was fabulous - you see some amazing sights on the way. On the day we visited, it was really very misty. Seeing the mountain "emerge" through the fog was a great experience.

    The Big Buddha Follow the sign!! Inside the temple
    Related to:
    • Gay and Lesbian
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Peak Tower

    by keeweechic Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Peak Tower is an unusual design which has been likened to a ‘wok’. There are viewing located on different levels of the tower where you can get a fabulous view.

    Inside the Tower you will find lots of shops, restaurants and amusements including Ripley's Believe It or Not!, the Peak Explorer Motion Simulator and Madame Tussaud's - London's famous wax museum.

    Viewing terraces located on different levels of the tower offer spectacular views of the Hong Kong and Kowloon skylines, including Victoria Harbour.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kennis112's Profile Photo

    Sightseeing Bus Tour in Hong Kong

    by Kennis112 Written Mar 17, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Last month, it was my first time to have a bus tour for sightseeing in Hong Kong. It¡¯s really amusing and interesting. Sitting on the upper deck of the bus, I explored Hong Kong panoramic view in a different angle. When the bus passed along the street, all the buildings and attractions the way seemed very close to me. I bought a one day pass priced around US$6 to enjoy unlimited rides on 2 thematic routes.

    I started the trip from Central Star Ferry, and took H1 Heritage Route to travel around Central and Western District. Leaving Star Ferry the bus passed Western Market, then along Hollywood Road, the famous antique shopping street, past Man Mo temple. I not only sightsee on the bus, but also can hop-on, hop-off at any designated stops. I took off in Man Mo Temple, walking along Lascar Row. Then, I got on the sightseeing bus to Dr Sun Yatsen Museum, and Hong Kong University. I traveled back through Western district and the dried seafood shops then past the Macau Ferry to the terminus at Star Ferry.

    After the heritage journey, I took another H2 Metropolis Route for my shopping tour. I left from Star Ferry and traveled through Wanchai to the shopping destination of Causeway Bay and Times Square, onto Happy Valley racecourse, and back via St John¡¯s Cathedral and Statue Square in the heart of Central. I do have lots of fun with my one day bus tour!

    Rickshaw Sightseeing Bus Rickshaw Sightseeing Bus Man Mo Temple Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter Sightseeing Bus Terminus
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Hong Kong Central Library

    by mikey_e Written Dec 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Central Library isn't really something that requires a whole lot of explanation, especially since it is unlikely to be a hot tourist destination for anyone visiting the island. Still, at 12 stories tall, it is a rather large centre of knowledge and learning, and it dominates a section of the Causeway thanks to the unusual lack of other skyscrapers in its vicinity. The Library was opened in 2001 and cost approximately $100 million, allowing for a high-tech institution that linked people with knowledge in a myriad of ways. Today, the library's steps are filled with cute school children in uniform running up and down as they come in and out of the library. There are a number of statues and exhibits around the Library which are worthy of pictures. Unless you are fully literate in Chinese, this library is probably not of interest to you, but it is still an interesting snapshot of the importance the HK government attaches to education.

    Hong Kong Central Library A statue out front of the library Another view of the fa��ade The small garden in front of the library
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Victoria Park

    by mikey_e Written Dec 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Victoria Park is, obviously, named after Queen Victoria, the British Regent who oversaw Britain's great expansion the height of its naval power. There is little in the park that is reminiscent of the Queen, except for a large bronze statue that was replaced in 1952. The original had been carted off to Japan by the occupying army and melted down. The modern park has little that reminds us of the stolid and repressed Victorian era, with brightly colour flowers and blossoms, plenty of sports facilities for men and women in sports clothes, and a general preference for large, open air and green spaces, rather than the dreariness of London. On Sundays, this park, like many others, is taken over by domestic helpers during their day off. Victoria Park, the largest in Hong Kong, is a favourite hangout for Indonesian maids, and you will find many, many Indonesian grocery stores and restaurants in the vicinity.

    Fountain in Victoria Park A slightly flooded cricket pitch Some of the colourful flower displays A view of the benches More of the tropical flora
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Causeway Bay

    by mikey_e Written Dec 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Causeway Bay is neither a causeway nor a bay. In fact, it is a dry land that is crammed with highrises and shops. At one point, there was a causeway that spanned a bay, but the bay has since been filled in in an effort to reclaim land and reduce the density of the city. Today, the area is the best place in HK to find knock-off anything, from bags to electronics to, likely, passports. The streets are packed with little shops, as well as a few malls that cater to high-end consumers. You can find no end of small noodle houses here to satisfy your hunger for real Chinese street food. There's not much else to Causeway Bay besides the plethora of stores and restaurants - there is a nice walk along the current coast, but it is often marred by heavy traffic.

    Causeway Bay More of the congestion A brighter view of the skyscrapers
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Western Market

    by mikey_e Written Dec 27, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Western Market, unlike Central Market, is an upscale establishment that is more of a tourist and pleasure market than any sort of actual market. The bottom floor has a number of jewellery stores and souvenir shops, while the escalator brings visitors to the large ballroom and restaurant that looks like it caters to events and weddings more than usual diners. The market is a tasteful British design. In truth, there's not much to say about the Market, but it is an interesting stop on a tour of the old part of the town.

    Western Market The sign advertising the Market British vaults at the entrance The first floor shoppes The ballroom and hall
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Central Market

    by mikey_e Written Dec 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For those who are looking for a typically Hong Kong messy, smelly market experience, Central Market is the place to go. There is nothing touristy about this place, and you are unlikely to find other tourists snapping away with you. This is a three-story marketplace with fish on the bottom floor, greens and other produce on the main floor and a large fastfood market on the top floor. It's not a very picturesque area, but it is a great place to visit if you're looking for the way the average Hong Kong resident lives - or if you're looking for a quick local bite.

    Fish market in the Central Market More of the fish market The vegetable floor Food stalls
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Hollywood Road

    by mikey_e Updated Dec 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hollywood Road has long been famous for its antique and curio shops. These are not shops selling the usual tourist crap that has made China such an industrious producer. Rather, they are filled with intricately carved and impressive examples of traditional Chinese art. Some of these sculptures, pendants and figurines are carved from jade, the stone that is much admired by many Chinese and East Asians. However, this is not the only medium that is used by the artisans whose goods fill these shops. In addition, there are many examples of exquisite carvings in the tusks of long-extinct mammoths. Whether this is true is something that is to be proven on a case by case basis, but one thing is for certain - these items are not for the amateur. For those of us who are unversed in the ways of Chinese artists, it is a simple pleasure to be able to walk along the sidewalks and admire the the complicated and life-like sculptures and carvings that fill the various curio shops.

    Note that the name of the street does not come from the bastion of entertainment, but rather from the family home of the second British Governor of the territory.

    Curio shop by Man Mo Temple More antique shops One of the higher-end sculpture shops A full display of items for sale
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Man Mo Temple

    by mikey_e Written Dec 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hollywood Road is not exactly a traditional section of the city, but the Man Mo temple here is quite impressive for the way it discretely stands between curio shops. The Temple was built during the 19th century, as Hong Kong grew rapidly thanks to its status as an important entrepôt between the West and the East. The spiritual needs of the Chinese inhabitants were met by temples that were incorporated into the rapidly densifying urban mass. The Man Mo temple is one such example, with a beautiful altar and statues. Temples in HK are not like churches - there is no set time for prayer, so visiting at any time may mean that you are disturbing the worship of various people. For this reason, photography is generally not permitted in the temples, which is a bit of a shame, given the interesting altars and statues of various dieties. In the main room, a civil god, Man Cheong, is revered, as well as a martial god, Kwang Shi. The temple also incorporated another structure, Lit Shing Kung, which is devoted to the heavenly gods. In all, you shouldn't be disrespectful by staying too long and photographing people praying, but the rituals provide an interesting and invalvuable perspective on a culture that is too often portrayed as hyper-commercialized.

    The Man Mo Temple A side view of the fa��ade The entrance to the temple One of the guarding lions
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Queen's Road

    by mikey_e Written Dec 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Queen's Road, together with Connaught, exemplify the Hong Kong that inhabits the minds and imaginations of most people. Both streets are lined with massive skyscrapers, stores and shops of all price ranges, and throng after throng of people. This is not the premiere shopping experience in HK - you have stores of all different types and prices, from convenience stores to Coach and Prada. That is likely why you can see all sorts of locals going about their shopping and their business, oblivious to the various tourists and their backpacks. There's not a whole lot that is of great interest with respect to historical sites on Queen's Road, but then again Hong Kong is known for its modern and commercialistic attitude towards life, so it would wrong to look for the spirtual on one of the city's busiest arteries.

    The Coach store at night Guess on Queen's Road A view of the traffic and the crowds More of the crowds spilling onto the streets Bank of China skyscraper
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Soho

    by mikey_e Written Dec 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Soho, like its London namesake, is a slightly sleazy place to go out for great restaurants, bars and nightclubs. It's not the most expensive or classiest part of the city, but it is a great place to eat well if fusion and quasi-exotic tastes are your thing. One thing to note about Soho is that 95% of the people here are likely foreigners, and you are probably going to see more Caucasians here than in downtown Toronto. Nevertheless, Soho is not a amalgammation of Americanized restaurants and McDonalds clones. It is a cosmopolitan hotspot that exemplifies why Hong Kong is so famous the world over for its laissez-faire attitude to just about any type of culture. Not only will you find every type of cuisine here (there are probably five times as many Brazilian people as there are noodle houses), but you are likely to find the entire spectrum of young professionals from every OECD country here, all mixing and mingling with other foreigners and the occasional Honger. Soho is not on a subway line, so it may be a bit of a hike if you don't take a taxi. During the worst of the summer humidity, that can be quite a sweaty feat, but it's well worth the show you get on the way up.

    Soho by night Down the mountain in Soho Up the mountain, avoiding a car Steps down the mountain, bars on the side A gaggle of Chinese restaurants at Lan Kwai
    Related to:
    • Gay and Lesbian
    • Singles
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Hong Kong Park

    by mikey_e Written Dec 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I think that I've probably covered the vast majority of what there is to do in the park, except for the park itself. This is another one of the many green spaces that dot an otherwise polluted city. Thanks to the humid and subtropical climate of Hong Kong, a myriad of plant and animal life can flourish here, delighting visitors of all ages. There are many different trees that have been imported from other Asian countries, as well as various flowers and flowering bushes. The ponds have fish and turtles in them - sure to delight children. There are a few places where vendors sell ice cream and drinks, but for the most part the park is remarkably free of hawkers, allowing visitors to laze away an afternoon and relax in the tranquillity of the park. The Queensway and Cotton Tree Drive entrance was covered with lanterns when I was there, but I'm not sure if this was a special thing, or something permanent.

    Laterns at the entrance to the park Waterfall in the Park Turtles playing in a pond Landscaped gardens by Rawlinson House Neo-traditional architecture in the Park
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware

    by mikey_e Updated Dec 27, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tea occupies an important place in Chinese culture, so it would only be appropriate for there to be a large exhibition of the accoutrements used in the preparation and serving of the beverage. The Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware is just such an institution, charting the entire tea ceremony from the earliest parts of Chinese culture up to competitions of contemporary artists' tea sets. Some of them are quite impressive, as they incorporate not only famous people and places, but also ideas and concepts into the serving of tea. The Museum also seeks to educate visitors on the properties of various types of tea, with explanations of the different categories of tea and the periods in which they were popular in China. As at any good museum, there is a complete selection of teas and tea ware for sale in the gift shop at the exit.

    Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Another view of the entrance The restaurant beside the Museum
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Hong Kong Island

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

35 travelers online now

Comments

Hong Kong Island Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Hong Kong Island things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Hong Kong Island sightseeing.

View all Hong Kong Island hotels