Do/Do Not!, Hong Kong

22 Reviews

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  • Do/Do Not!
    by Assenczo
  • Do/Do Not!
    by machomikemd
  • Do/Do Not!
    by machomikemd
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    No Littering in Public Beaches

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 23, 2014

    while many public beaches around the world advertise no littering in it's environs and have poisted signs for locals and tourists to see it, Hong Kong Take this Step Further by deputizing the life guards and roving public beach police to arrest anyone caught dumping or littering along the many public beaches and they will fine you 1500 hong kong dollars per piece of trash you throw away! so be careful in being a litterbug as there are many public trash bins along the edges of the public beaches.or else they would issue a heavy fine!

    rightly so
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    No Smoking at Public Beaches

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 22, 2014

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    again another hefty fine awaits you

    Hong Kong as many outlying islands like Lantau, Lamma, Tsing Yi and Hong Kong Island and there are many public Beaches in the Territory but smoking is not allowed inside the beaches and anyone caught smoking at a public beach will be fined 1500 Hong Kong Dollars (about 200 US Dollars) per cigarette stick.

    but smokers, don't despair as the concrete pathways beside the public beaches have designated smoking areas for you!

    ok designated smoking area
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    Always wrap chewing gum before disposal!

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 22, 2014

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    Unlike the nation city of Singapore, where all kinds of chewing gum is banned, in Hong Kong, chewing gums are allowed and even enjoy brisk sales! but a caveat: do not throw chewing gum everywhere and even is you dispose the used chewing gum in the trash cans and trash bins, be sure to put them in the wrapper that you opened before you used them and then throw them at the trash bins as throwing chewing gum to trash bins without being enclosed to the wrappers will cost you 15000 hong kong dollars per piece!

    be careful
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    don't be a litter bug!

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 22, 2014

    litterbugs are a bane to mankind everywhere in the planet and every country imposes fines and even prison terms for litterbugs and hong kong is very strict with these litterbugs and you would see many posters at many areas of the city displaying to people that you can be fined up to 1500 hong kong dollars per piece of items you throw away at the street if they caught you (about 200 US Dollars) so be wary and just throw the trash at the many trash bins around hong kong instead of being a litterbug.,

    again a hefty fine awaits you!

    clear
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    No Smoking in Public Transports!

    by machomikemd Updated Sep 22, 2014

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    Hong Kong, like in any country, forbids smoking cigarettes and cigars at Public Transports such as taxis, public buses, at the MTR, Star Ferry, Private Tour Vans and Buses and as you can see in the picture, a hefty fine await you if you even try and the fine is 5,000 Hong Kong Dollars (about 800 US Dollars) per lit cigarette! and theyn amended it recently to include the now popular "e" cigarettes (electronic cigarettes) so when you have the urge to smoke, do it once your are outside the Public Transports as you can smoke at open areas.

    clear enough!
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    Save your saliva

    by Assenczo Updated Mar 4, 2014

    The Book of Manners is being rewritten again. Is spitting cool or not? The answer is: it used to be but not anymore. At least this is how things look in Kowloon where old China with its smelly sidewalk markets is still very much alive. The contrary trend of high-density modernity must impose its own rules of cleanliness for the sake of popular health and clash is inevitable. To make things perfectly clear which way the society is going signs are posted in both official languages. For folks coming from India, for example, this might look like overkill and visitors from let’s say Norway might end up in intensive care unit for severe culture shock.

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    Bring your own shopping bag

    by theguardianangel Updated Jun 9, 2012

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    When buying stuffs in supermarkets, you must bring your own bag or you’ll be asked to purchase a plastic bag for the items you just bought! The plastic bag costs less than HK$1 and the locals are not advisable to use a plastic bag. BUT that wasn't really the issue. The supermarket staffs will look at you like you’ve done something very offensive.., but I think what happened to me was the reverse. I was very offended! Well, what do you know... you're just a foreigner! (those staffs are very unfriendly, i just forgot the name of that supermarket!)

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    Traditions, beliefs and superstitions

    by SLLiew Updated Jan 15, 2008

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    Hong Kongers live in a modern fast moving society but many retains their Chinese traditons, beliefs and superstitutions. It is not unusual to see temples right in the middle of an urban sprawl.

    Feng shui masters and fortune tellers are often consulted in building designs, date of moving house or looking for the right spouse.

    For business people, it is important not to use the wrong words like bankruptcy, etc. It is well known that most shop-keepers will want to start their buisness day with a sale and close with a sale. So you are the first customer or last customer beware of the pros and cons. If you are buying, you wil get a great bargain but if you are just window shoping, tread carefully and do not get the wrath of the shop-keeper.

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    Superstitions, superstitions

    by bpacker Updated Aug 14, 2007

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    It's a commonly known fact that Hong Kongers are a superstitious lot, not too different from their Southern cousin, the Singaporeans. Here's a number of common beliefs that defy logic:

    1) obsession with lucky numbers.
    It was too long ago that some sod paid a lot of money for a personal license plate containing the number "9," which sounds like the Cantonese word for longevity. It made history since it was for more than a million bucks. The numbers "3" and "8" are also lucky numbers and you'll find it in a lot of business telephone numbers .

    2) clocks suck as gifts
    The Chinese word for clock sounds like the word for death, give a clock gift to your host and you'll never eat lunch in this town again.

    3) The period between Aug and Sep (seventh month) is considered an unlucky period.
    According to Chinese superstition, the hell gates are open once a year during the seventh month of the Lunar calendar. Yes, lo, it is the Hungry Ghost Month! During this period, Singaporeans and Hong Kongers tend to tread very carefully around ancient beliefs to avoid offending the roaming spirits. Many avoid getting married, relocating, changing jobs or making investments or travelling. Surprisinly in China, the hungry ghost month superstitions are pratically non-existent. I suppose ghosts do not roam there.

    4) Feng Shui
    Hong Kongers and Singaporeans love to hire geomancers ( Feng Shui Astrologers) and consult them over every damm thing, from auspicious marriage dates to interior design. Place your furniture in the wrong position and lo, you might lose your hair, your money and God knows what else.

    This sucks as a gift in HK

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    Chopsticks Etiquettes

    by xuessium Written Apr 29, 2005

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    Never ever stick your chopsticks straight up in your bowl of rice. Not only it's rude, chopsticks stuck straight up in a bowl of rice also resembles jossticks in an urn which is only meant for funerals. Never ever do this during a banquet or during a hosted meal.

    Also, never use a chopstick to point at something, most least a person. Very rude.

    Chopsticks
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    Never buy clocks as gifts for Chinese friends

    by xuessium Written Apr 29, 2005

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    You should never buy clocks as gifts for Chinese friends (unless they do not mind). Many older folks still frown at that as the Chinese words for "sending clocks" sound almost the same as "sending you to your grave". So, if you are intending to buy a gift for a Chinese friend, clocks should never be a consideration! On the other hand, watches are fine.

    Clock
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    All wrap up to go

    by xuessium Written Apr 29, 2005

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    If you intend to buy the food for a takeaway, the instruction is "Wai Mai" (To sell externally) . Folks in Southeast Asia is so used to the term "Da Bao" (which means packet-up to go) that we tend to use the same term in HK. Unfortunately, in HK, "Da Bao" means wrapping up the dead, which earned me quite a few dirty looks on my first trip to HK before I realised the taboo.

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  • Get your Octopus card directly after you landed!

    by wiamy Updated Sep 26, 2004

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    There is nothing much important than get your Octopus card than anything else when you first arrived in HK. You probably will see the machine when you arrived at the airport.
    The octopus card is used for transportation, 7-11, even soda machine. You need to get your octopus card around if you dont want to carry all the small HK coins around.
    Octopus card is a pre-paid card. You load $ in any machine or even 7-11 shops and just put it on the octopus reader and you will be charged.

    If you put it in your wallet in your bag, you dont even get the card out. Just put your bag on top of the reader than you are charged.

    Check out the website below for special deal for tourist!

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    We are not too get using on close body contact

    by iretyc Written Mar 16, 2003

    Local people here are mostly not quite get using on close body contact like, kissing on cheek, a great hug for greeting or goodbye

    People sometimes are quite shy in answering foreigners approaching for question raised. Though we are shy, most can still offer assistance for help in giving proper direction. Esp in English or Mandarin

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  • Like any country, mind your...

    by dzni Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Like any country, mind your P's and Q's. Don't come off as an inbred American, being rude to the locals for whatever reason (of course, unless they're blatantly rude to you too). Anyway, don't lose face, as they say. This may be Hong Kong and a British-Chinese cosmopolitan mecca, but you still have to respect differences in their culture. Ok, pretty obvious advice I think.

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Comments (1)

  • Oct 10, 2013 at 7:23 PM

    Say sorrry & excuse me alot, works great. I hear it alot. Ask for help anything to holding a door to directions, people respond. Go with the flow, pedestrians don't use left vs. right as much as the flow, like water. Stand/on right, walk on left on moving walkways, sidewalks. Efficiency is key so just proceed through a door to keep things moving. Be polite, don't talk loud, learn phone etiquette. Don't put shoes on benches, seats. Learn why/when to wear a face mask. Never cough/sneeze into the open air/ use elbow, you'll get the stink eye.

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