New Territories, Hong Kong

39 Reviews

Kowloon

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Ma Wat Wai, Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail
    Ma Wat Wai, Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail
    by cal6060
  • Lung Yeuk Tau Village with Bus
    Lung Yeuk Tau Village with Bus
    by cal6060
  • Ma Wat Wai, Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail
    Ma Wat Wai, Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail
    by cal6060
  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Chi Lin Nunnery

    by clairegeordio Written Apr 4, 2007

    This Buddhist nunnery, in Diamond Hill was founded in the 1930's but reopened in the year 2000 and is a replica from the Tang Dynasty (AD 618-907)
    Apparently not one nail was used in it's construction! Instead they used interlocking pieces of wood.
    There are some beautiful lotus ponds in front of the Nunnery. It is quite an unusual sight with the backdrop of skyscrapers behind. It is worth a visit, especially if you are visiting the Wong Tai Sin temple, as that is only 1 MTR stop away from the Chi Lin Nunnery.

    Open: Thurs-Tues 9am-3:30pm Free admission

    PHOTOS TO FOLLOW

    Chi Lin Nunnery Lotus pond Lotus pond with water spouts
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Inside main temple- Ten thousand buddhas monastery

    by clairegeordio Updated Apr 3, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the main temple there are 12,900 minature buddhas on view, either statues or plaques all gold plated. In the center there are 3 large buddhas - the Buddha of Medicine on the right, in the middle the Goddess of Mercy and on the left the Ti-tsany with a stick in his hand. Sitting in the middle of the front row is the founder of the Monastery, the Reverend Yuet Kai.

    Inside main temple- ten thousand buddhas monastery Inside main temple- ten thousand buddhas monastery Inside main temple- ten thousand buddhas monastery Inside main temple- ten thousand buddhas monastery

    Was this review helpful?

  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Ten thousand Buddhas monastery

    by clairegeordio Updated Apr 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This colourful, vibrant complex of temples was built in the 1950's and is located in Shatin, north of Kowloon.
    There are actually around 12,800 buddhas inside the main temple. You can also see several other temples, 2 pavillions, a nine story pagoda, not forgetting around 500 gilded life size statues along the 400 steps walkway up to the monastery, each one unique in appearance. Don't miss the steps to the side of the main temple where you can reach other temples and some more statues, very interesting and beautiful!

    For more information regarding the inside of the main temple please refer to my other tip and for more photos on this interesting place, please look at my travelogue.

    Ten thousand Buddhas monastery, main temple Walkway up to ten thousand Buddhas monastery Nine story pagode, ten thousand Buddhas monastery Ten thousand Buddhas monastery Upper level, Ten thousand Buddha monastery

    Was this review helpful?

  • gloopgloop's Profile Photo

    Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees

    by gloopgloop Written Aug 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These two famous banyan trees are a favourite with local villagers who come to burn joss sticks and incense papers hoping their wishes will come true. During Chinese New Year, many Hong Kong people make a pilgrimage to this spot to make their Chinese New Year wishes.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Women's Travel
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • gloopgloop's Profile Photo

    Hong Kong Gold Coast

    by gloopgloop Written Aug 27, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ultra-sophisticated Gold Coast Resort looks much like a Mediterranean resort transplanted to the shores of Hong Kong. It has a world-class hotel, a convention centre, a shopping mall and a marina club, as well as its man-made Golden Beach and palm-shaded Promenade dotted with kiosks.

    Golden Beach is the largest public beach in Tuen Mun and the first artificial beach in Hong Kong. At 545 metres long, it covers a total area of 7.85 hectares.

    Adding to the French Riviera atmosphere is an art area called Gold Coast Montmartre, where, every Saturday and Sunday afternoon, street art, handicrafts and other forms of culture find expression.

    A view from a hotel window
    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort
    • Luxury Travel
    • Women's Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • gloopgloop's Profile Photo

    Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden

    by gloopgloop Written Aug 27, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Kadoorie Farm & Botanic Garden showcases Hong Kong's wealth of natural flora and fauna. The orchards and vegetable fields here are almost 100% organic. Conservation activities concentrate on protecting native orchids and rehabilitating birds of prey.

    Admission fee is HK 10 dollars. Open 9.30am until 5pm

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • gloopgloop's Profile Photo

    The real Hong Kong

    by gloopgloop Written Aug 22, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you want to experience old village life - be brave and get out of the main hustle and bustle of Kowloon and venture out into the New Territories eg, Yuen Long or Sha Tin. You can wander into villages which still exist (for now!) and see ancestral halls etc.

    Related to:
    • Singles
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • SeanJFK's Profile Photo

    Lam Tsuen Wishing Tree

    by SeanJFK Written Sep 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We saw this on Globetrekker and decide it was a must. You Buy colored streamers from a little stand by the tree and wright your wishes on them. You attach the streamers to an orange and throw them as high as possible into the tree. If your Orange catches onto the branches, your wish will come true. Apparently the higher you can get it lodged the better your chances. It was certainly aimed at the tourist crowd, but we did see some locals taking part as well. It was well worth the adventure and offering the Oranges to the tree in exchange for your wish seemed like a fair trade to me

    My wish in there somewhere!
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • xiquinho's Profile Photo

    The New Territories and Outer Islands

    by xiquinho Written Sep 23, 2004

    Hong Kong's rustic back yard, this 300-plus square mile area contains mountains where wild monkeys live. Lantau (the territory's largest island) offers one of the world's largest Buddha statues, parks and campsites. On Cheung Chau, there is a quaint harbour and fishing village. Lamma boasts scenic walking trails and superb seafood restaurants.

    Was this review helpful?

  • taurus1973's Profile Photo

    temples of the new territories

    by taurus1973 Written May 12, 2004

    well for people who want to see as much of hong kong as possible i found two great places well worth a look. both are easily accesible by train. the first is the wong tai sin temple situated in wong tai sin. it is probably hong kongs most important place of worship. the other is the ten thousand buddha pagoda situated in sha tin. it actually contains over twelve thousand buddha images but is a great place for hiking and culture. for kung fu fans...i recommend a pilgrimedge to kowloon tong to 41 cumberland road, the former residence of kung fu legend bruce lee. fans will be dissapointed though to see the shabby left overs of a once beautiful mansion. the japanese garden in the front has been replaced with concrete. a word of warning, anyone looking to go inside should well be aware that the building now is a bordello complete with guards.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Quinevere's Profile Photo

    Tai Tam Reservoir

    by Quinevere Written Mar 8, 2004

    This second large water storage was built by government. The cost of phase one (1883-1888) alone amounted to $1.25 million, about twice the total cost of Pok Fu Lam Reservoir. It's located in the upper valley, more than one mile from the coast. Featuring a huge dam that intercepts water to create a massive enclosure for rainwater, it was a massive engineering feat. Fresh water from the reservoir was fed to the Bowen Road pipeline via a tunnel (3 miles in total length). After treatment at the water works, it was supplied to residents of HK Island. The great Tai Tam dam is a granite and concrete structure measures 90 feet tall, 400 feet wide and 60 feet thick. The most challenging aspect of the project is the pipeline tunnel that runs through Wong Nai Chung Gap. This 6 x 7 feet tunnel is more than 7,300 feet long and runs through hard granite. Without advanced engineering machines, work was completed by manpower and using basic tools. The working conditions were taxing, as workers were drilling through hills in hostile rock and rough forest. Many workers contracted diseases and died as a result. Apart from overcoming adverse site conditions, the reservoir engineers had another great achievement. The Tai Tam Reservoir pioneered a water pumping technique, which effectively broke the traditional down-flowing water supply method then in use. It was indeed a major step forward for the waterworks development of HK. The completion of the Tai Tam Reservoir works brought an adequate water supply. The government satisfied with the result, started piping water to the public in 1890. The Tai Tam Waterworks had several extension projects, which increased the total storage capacity to nearly 400,000,000 gallons from 250,000,000 gallons. In 1918, Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, with even greater capacity, was completed. While supplying water to residents in Victoria, Tai Tam Reservoir also looked after the needs of North Point and Shau Kei Wan.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lonely_traveller's Profile Photo

    Hong Kong Wetlands

    by lonely_traveller Written Jan 25, 2004

    Towards the north of Hong Kong's territory, there are a few wetland areas where birds from all over Asia comes here to rest. Although constantly being threatened by development both in Hong Kong and its neighbouring Shenzhen, China, wetland areas in Hong Kong are strictly preserved under the Ramsar Convention. Some of these famous areas include Mai Po and Tsim Bei Tsui

    Was this review helpful?

  • gabriellefox's Profile Photo

    Visit one of the many Country...

    by gabriellefox Updated Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit one of the many Country Parks
    Country Parks closest to Urban centres are full of recreational features, such as signposted jogging and hiking trails, barbecue and picnic sites, pavilions and 'Family Walks' and 'Nature Trails'. Markers refer to specific items of natural interest, whilst visitors' Centres have been built at the entrance to several popular parks containing information counters and exhibits of the area's flora and fauna, geology and human history

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tai Long Wan which means Big...

    by Gary_Yeung Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tai Long Wan which means Big Wave Bay is located in the most eastern part of Sai Kung Peninsula directly facing the Pacific. It is one of the most remote parts of Hong Kong. The mountain ranges, the long beaches and the sounds and sights of big waves are stunning! Very few people, usually the experienced hikers visit these beaches as there are no roads leading there and the mountains are steep.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • The Bridepond or 'Sun Leung...

    by Gary_Yeung Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Bridepond or 'Sun Leung Tam' is famous because the local folklore tells a sad story of a bride who was washed away by a flood there while she was on her way to her husband's home. It is located in a valley in the Pat Sin Range country park. Quite a number of HK people like hiking and it is not uncommon for the HK families to take a long walk along some more gentle hiking trails in the many country parks we have here. It may be difficult for those who are not living here to plan such hiking trips, but if you are going to skip it, it's going to be a shame.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Hong Kong

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

33 travelers online now

Comments

View all Hong Kong hotels