Rishikesh Local Customs

  • Prayers at Triveni Ghat
    Prayers at Triveni Ghat
    by toonhut
  • Dusk at Triveni Ghat
    Dusk at Triveni Ghat
    by toonhut
  • Local Customs
    by RAJASTHANBYCAR

Most Recent Local Customs in Rishikesh

  • toonhut's Profile Photo

    Evening Ganga prayers

    by toonhut Updated Nov 15, 2010

    After seeing all three, here's what I think of the basic difference in the evening Ganga prayers.

    1. Haridwar: Big, bass boosted, tight, kind of a spectacle for the eyes with all the human energy and little temples bustling together.

    2. Rishikesh, Triveni Ghat: More quiet, subtle, payers directly next to the river almost touching the water; no steps in between like in Haridwar. Wide, stony, empty beach with twinkling lights in the back... pretty peaceful (if the prayers are not being done over loudspeakers).

    3. Swarg Ashram, Ram Jhula: 3km from Rishikesh, prayers here are most different. Many people gather here too but its not tight like Haridwar. More of a meditative discussion-prayer-chant. Whole thing lasts the longest here. Lots of young disciples sing along with much harmony and unison.

    They all start at about 6.30 - 7.00 pm. Being part of any is a feast. See whatever works works for you.

    Dusk at Triveni Ghat Prayers at Ram Jhula, Swarg Ashram Prayers at Triveni Ghat
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  • lynnehamman's Profile Photo

    Dry & Vegetarian

    by lynnehamman Updated Apr 29, 2009

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    There is no alchohol for sale in Rishikesh, and the city is strictly vegetarian.
    The lack of alchohol has obviously not been a problem- the supply of other forms of relaxing substances makes up for that. Chillums are for sale in every side stall.

    There is a place nearby, 11kms south on the Haridwar Road, that sells meat and alchohol if the need for these is felt by any traveller

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  • David&Pauline's Profile Photo

    Ganga dip

    by David&Pauline Updated Apr 16, 2006

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    Bathing in the Ganga is one of the main reasons for Rishikesh's existence, though the water is Himalayan cold, it is clean and not as lethal to tourists as the river becomes in Varanasi. Aarti, the floating lantern ceremony is performed every evening at the main ghat, in downtown Rishikesh. Lakshman Jhula is not the place to witness this as the Ganga is just entering the town at this spot. The downtown Triveni Ghat has much more of a Holy Day atmosphere and attracts far more Hindu pilgrims than tourists, which does contribute to the religious carnival atmosphere. The beautiful larger than life painted statues of Shiva, Lakshman and other Hindu gods add to the colourful scene, particularly set against the ice white of the Ganga. Lakshman Jhula does have a lot of its own colour, mostly the red of the many-tiered temples and the acolytes who dress as Hindu gods. Swarg Ashram has the largest collection of Sadhus and Gurus, sporting some flamboyant costumes and hairdos, not just the traditional orange robes. It's quite a common if strange, sight to see the younger holy men riding motorcycles, they cut quite a dash and turn many a lady tourist's head.

    Sam braves the Ganga Triveni Ghat Triveni Ghat main square Harihar Pith
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  • shobhanaj's Profile Photo

    No shoes in a temple

    by shobhanaj Written Jul 28, 2004

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    Be sure to remove your shoes before entering any temple. Shoes are considered dirty as we walk with them everywhere. Also many temples do not allow leather in any form (belts, wallets, watch straps, shoes, bags, etc.). So check before entering.

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  • shobhanaj's Profile Photo

    Daily rituals

    by shobhanaj Written Jul 11, 2004

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    An important part of living in Rishikesh is the daily dip in the holy river. It is usually done either at dawn or late afternoon and evening. I was told that this old man in the picture performed this daily ritual every single day no matter what the temperature of the water is. And the water can get very cold. This devotion is what keeps this country alive. It is fascinating to think that he is there everyday doing what he believes in and his faith makes all discomforts tolerable.

    An evening prayer
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Rishikesh Local Customs

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