Museums, Hyderabad

13 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Museums
    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Museums
    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Museums
    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Must See: Salar Jung Museum

    by Donna_in_India Updated Nov 23, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance to Salar Jung Museum

    This museum houses historical information and priceless antiques and relics collected from all over the world by the Nawab Salar Jung III. It was declared as an Institution of National Importance by the Indian Parliament. There are 36 galleries in the Museum spread over in three buildings on 2 floors - Central Block, Eastern Block and Western Block.

    The Indian art collection was fascinating. Beautiful sculptures of marble, ivory, wood, etc. Some of the collection dated back as early as the 1st century. Paintings, pottery, arms and armour were also on display. The Middle East, Far East, and the West are also represented in the museum.

    There's also a Founder's Gallery that recreates the lives of the Salar Jungs.

    It is a very large museum and I believe it is the best museum I have come across in India. We were originally going to skip it, but I'm so glad we didn't.

    No photography is allowed inside (there are lockers outside). The museum is open 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. It is closed on Fridays and certain public holidays. Admission is Rs 15 for Indians and Rs 150 for foreigners.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • vpas's Profile Photo

    salar Jung Museum

    by vpas Updated Jan 21, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The largest single man's collection in the world.This is a treasure house of art and antiques collected by Mir Yousef Ali Khan Salar Jung III(1889 TO 1949), the Prime Minister of the seventh Nizam of Hyderabad.The Museum has 40,000 objects of world art comprising Indian Art,Middle eastern art,Far eastern and European art and sculptor.The interesting one is that of veiled Rebecca,a marble statue of a woman in veil.The library over here has over has 43,000 articles and 50,000 books and rare manuscripts of Arabic,Urdu and Persian.
    Entry fee Rs.10 for Indians and Rs.150 for non-Indians.
    Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,closed on Fridays and public holidays
    p.s.:try and be at the center of the museum where there is a clock by noon,when there is a specatacular doll play when the clock stikes 12

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • vpas's Profile Photo

    The Nizam's Museum

    by vpas Written Dec 13, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Nizam's splendid purani Haveli

    The Museum displays the gifts and mementoes presented to the last Nizam of Hyderabad - Mir Osman Ali Khan,on the occassion of the silver Jubilee celebration in the year 1936.The Museum offers a lot of notable items like gold burnished wooden throne used for silver jubilee celebrations,a gold model of the Jubilee Pavillion,a tiffin box made of gold and diamonds and the wardrobe of the VI Nizam of Hyderabad.
    Timings: 9.30 a.m. -- 4.30 p.m.(closed on Fridays)
    Entry fee-- Rs.65 for adults and Rs.15 for children

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • JohnniOmani's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum

    by JohnniOmani Written Apr 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hyderabad has some great museum and this is most evident in the Salar Jung Museum. The museum has a huge collection and its exhibits are from all over the world. Some of the relics date back to the 1st century and the collection includes sculptures, woodcarvings and Persian paintings, manuscripts as well as weapons and thousands of books. It ended up being a fantastic afternoon and I highly recommend it :)

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum - Intro

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 16, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This veritable treasure house is located in the heart of the Old City, on the south bank of River Musi, a river that flows lazily through the city. The Charminar, Mecca Masjid, Osmania Hospital, are all a stone’s throw from here. It is a storehouse of the fabulous art, culture and painting of European, Asian and Far Eastern countries, built mainly through the untiring effort – and a lot of money – of one man, Mir Yousuf Ali Khan, popularly known as Salar Jung III. It was established on Dec. 16, 1951.

    There are 38 galleries on two floors, spread out over three buildings, the Eastern block, the Western block and the Main building. Broadly speaking, the collection consists of European, Middle Eastern, Far Eastern and Indian art. One gallery is devoted to the Salar Jung family. The most riveting pieces of art, the statues and the paintings, are on the first floor while the Veiled Rebecca is on the Ground Floor. The Musical Clock is in the corridor close to the room where the Veiled Rebecca is kept. There are plenty of chairs to sit and watch the clock chime away. For the true connoisseur of art, even a full day may not do justice to this vast, varied and wonderful collection. Security is tight while entering the Museum and the guards in each room are very watchful. Restrooms and a no-frills cafeteria, complete the picture.

    First Written: Apr. 16, 2012

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum - The Veiled Rebecca

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 16, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Amongst the statues, the pride of place must go to ‘The Veiled Rebecca’ by the gifted Italian sculptor, G.B. Benzoni in Room 12, Central Block, Ground Floor. This was acquired in 1876 by Salar Jung I whilst on a visit to Italy. This piece is music in marble, a sui generis, a class apart.

    It is a life-sized statue on a pedestal hewn from a single piece of white marble. Such feminine beauty, full of bashfulness (appearing before a suitor), with a veil to cover her modesty chiselled from such a hard substance as marble, is unparalleled. The slight bent of the head, the bent right knee, the right hand going up to her throat, the left hand flung out in disarray – all contribute to the confusion and coyness of the would-be bride.

    The sculptor has deliberately left a blot on the right thigh of the statue, perhaps, to indicate that perfection is only for the gods.

    Firfst Written: Apr. 16, 2012

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum - Four Seasons Statues

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 16, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    In the same room (The Veiled Rebecca), on both sides of the wall, are some more fascinating marble statues. Special mention may be made of ‘Summer Season’, ‘Autumn Season’, ‘Winter Season’, ‘Spring Season’ and ‘Roman Woman’.

    First Written: Apr. 16, 2012

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum - English Bracket Clock

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 16, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The Musical Clock kept in the corridor just outside the Rebecca Gallery, with a large TV screen beside it and plenty of chairs in the front, is a sure crowd-puller, irrespective of age. Though not as elaborate as the Astronomical Clock in Prague, it is still an ornate piece of art.

    It is an English Bracket Clock, manufactured in England but assembled in Kolkata and has 350 moving parts. What is of interest here is the blacksmith standing on the top right of the clock face and hammering away the seconds, the chiming of the clock every 15 minutes and the appearance of a bearded man in a red dress every hour from an enclosure to strike the hour on a large bell. The crowd waits for the noon time as the bearded man strikes the clock 12 times. The clock also shows the day, date and month.

    First Written: Apr. 16, 2012

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • alycat's Profile Photo

    Must absolutely visit the...

    by alycat Updated Apr 17, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Must absolutely visit the Salarjung Museum, Falaknuma Palace, have food in any of the irani hotels and see a Hindi movie in a cineplex. Some of the things that would truly let you see the culture, lingo and carefree attitude of the hyderabadi's.

    Was this review helpful?

  • vin1's Profile Photo

    very good museum

    by vin1 Written Jan 6, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Salarjung museum, it is near to the ols city, on the way to charminar. It has some very good collections. Do not miss the vieled rebecca, it is the star of collections there. since it is a single person collection, you can see a certain taste to art prominent.

    State museum in public gardens, it is next to the state assembly. It has lil collection compared to the salarjung museum.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Archie_Oak's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum The third...

    by Archie_Oak Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Salar Jung Museum
    The third largest museum in India, the artifacts are kept in 36 huge halls, painstakingly collected by Mir Yusaf Ali Khan, (Salar Jung III), the prime minister of Nizam of Hyderabad.
    It contains over 35,000 exhibits as varied as Persian carpets, wood carvings, miniatures, armory and clothing. The Jade Room has swords, daggers and clothing of Mughal emperors and Tipu Sultan. The museum is open every day except Friday

    Was this review helpful?

  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum - Paintings

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 16, 2012
    4 more images

    The beautiful paintings of the European collection are in Gallery No. 1 of the Western Block, the focus being on British painters of the 19th century. ‘Ariadne Abandoned By Theseus’, ‘Ariadne Rescued By Theseus’, ‘Biblis’, ‘The Last Hours of Marie Antoinette’, ‘Three Stages In Napoleon's Life’, are all masterpieces. The first is by Sir Frederick Leighton, the second by Gladstone Solomon, the next by W.A. Bouguereau, the fourth by Charles Louis Muller and the final one by Gaston de Travellier.

    First Written: Apr. 16, 2012

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • anilpradhanshillong's Profile Photo

    Salar Jung Museum - Mephistopheles and Margaretta

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Apr 16, 2012
    4 more images

    Equally captivating is a double-figure wood sculpture of an insouciant Mephistopheles and the demure Margaretta, back to back in Gallery No. 1 of the Western Block, the same room as the paintings. Earlier, this statue was on the ground floor and was not cordoned off. You could go round it time and again, seeing the faces of Evil and of Good alternately, the pride of one and the humility of the other, the rashness of one and the caution of the other. You still see all these and much more as now there is a full-length mirror behind the statue.

    What is remarkable is how the sculptor has skilfully managed the protrusion of a bold and brash figure to showcase the humbleness and piousness of another figure, the most prominent being the puffed-out chest stance of Mephistopheles countered by the bent humility of Margaretta. The unknown sculptor appears to be announcing to the world that in this world, Good and Evil are but two sides of the same coin; it only depends which side is more pronounced in which person.

    The artist may have taken the idea of Good and Evil from Goethe’s famous German drama ‘Dr. Faust’. This play was later written by the gifted playwright, Christopher Marlow, a play in which Mephistopheles beguiles a doctor into trading his soul for sensual pleasures for a specific number of years, with tragic consequences. The last soliloquy of the condemned doctor says it all:

    “(The clock strikes eleven)
    Faustus. Ah Faustus,
    Now hast thou but one bare hour to live,
    And then thou must be damned perpetually.
    Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven,
    That time may cease and midnight never come.
    Fair nature’s eye, rise again, and make
    Perpetual day; or let this hour be but
    A year, a month, a week, a natural day,
    That Faust may repent and save his soul.
    The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike.
    The devil will come, and Faust must be damned.”

    First Written: Apr. 16, 2012

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Hyderabad

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

87 travelers online now

Comments

View all Hyderabad hotels