Hampi Things to Do

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    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Things to Do
    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Things to Do
    by anilpradhanshillong

Most Recent Things to Do in Hampi

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    Visit Vittala Temple Complex

    by abi_maha Written Nov 16, 2013
    The Magnificent Chariot
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    This the epicenter of Hampi’s attractions- Vittala Temple is the most extravagant architectural showpiece of Hampi!! Words fail to express the beauty of this architectural marvel! The stone chariot located inside the campus is almost an iconic structure of Hampi. Vittala, after whom the temple is known, is a form of lord Vishnu - more popular in the story of Panduranga Vittala, but let me get to that another day.

    Back to this temple complex- the temple is built like all others in Hampi, within a sprawling campus with compound wall and gateway towers. There are many halls, pavilions and temples located inside this campus.The temple was originally built in the 15th century AD. Many successive kings have enhanced the temple campus during their regimes to the present form. The highlight of Vittala temple is its impressive pillared halls and the stone chariot- it is probably the most photographed structure in Hampi! The halls are carved with an overwhelming array of sculptures on the giant granite pillars.

    The stone chariot is not a chariot really, but one of the five mantapas's that adorn the entrance of this complex. It houses a Garuda (Brahmini Kite)- popularly believed to be Lord Vishnu's vehicle of transport. In front of the chariot are two elephants seemingly pulling the chariot.

    Once you cross the chariot you see the central main hall in this complex. This hall ahs intricate sculpting and is most popular for its musical pillars- the slender stone pillars emit sound whn tapped on lightly. But excessive tapping by tourists has caused it damage and hence access to the pillars is now cordoned off.

    The other notable attractions within this temple complex are the Goddess’s shrine, the hundred-pillared hall, and the Kalyan Mantapa or marriage hall. The Kalyana mantapa is used to celebrate the marriage festival of the mobile Utsavamurthi. This celebration is called Kalyana Utsava.

    Close to this temple, is a unique weighing balance called King’s balance and it is made completely of stone. Records reveal that the ruling kings were weighed using gold and food. The equivalent weight was distributed to the poor. This ritual is called Thulabhara or weighing on a scale.

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    33-Virupaksha or Pampapati Temple

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Mar 1, 2013
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    Virupaksha or Pampapati Temple is the oldest and the most sacred temple in the city of Hampi. It is also one of the oldest functioning temples in India. Siva, in the form of Virupaksha or Pampapati, the husband of Pampa, is worshipped here along with His consort, Pampa. Their annual marriage is celebrated in a grand manner in the spring (March/April) through a Car Festival in the company of thousands of devotees and tourists. Two giant chariots containing the statues of the deities are pulled along the broad bazaar street till the monolithic bull statue at the end of the street and then dragged backed.

    Earlier, worshippers bathed themselves before paying obeisance at the temple at the Manmatha tank located on the western side of the temple. Next to it stands a cluster of shrines, one of which is the Durgadevi shrine. An inscribed slab in its porch bears the date 1199 AD. This record is the earliest one to indicate the worship of Pampa and of Virupaksha at Hampi.

    The temple complex was built over the years during the period of different kings with the main shrine being older than the founding of the Vijayanagar kingdom in 1336 AD. Harihara I, the first king of the Vijayanagar kingdom built a temple near the main shrine to honour Madhava or Vidyaranya, the sage who had helped him in the establishment of his kingdom. Proluganti Tippa, a military commander of Devaraya II (1422-46 AD) added the lofty eastern gopura which is the main entrance to the temple. It stands on a solid double-layered stone base, is nine-storeyed and commands a height of 170 ft. (52 m). All four sides are richly carved and embellished. Krishna Deva Raya repaired this in 1510 AD when he was building the smaller three-storeyed inner gopura in honour of his coronation. This leads into the inner courtyard. By 1520 AD, the entire temple complex assumed its present form.

    The lofty eastern gopura leads to a large courtyard containing smaller shrines. The Phalapuja mandapa here is unique in that a narrow channel of the mighty Tungabhadra River flows through its terrace into the kitchen before winding its way out of the temple complex through the outer courtyard.

    You buy your ticket outside the temple on the left-hand side. The moment you enter, a temple elephant may greet you from the left. If you wish, you pay a token amount of INR 10/- to the mahout, stand in front of the regal beast which will swing up the trunk with a soft grunt and gently place it on top of your head as a blessing. You are allowed to hold the trunk for a brief while before the elephant swings it back.

    You enter the courtyard and immediately on your far left lies the 100-columned hall. Behind this is the kitchen. You enter the smaller second gopura and directly in front will be the mandapa with the painted ceiling. To your right, outside, is the Manmatha tank while to your far right is another gopura. Beyond the gopura and on the extreme right corner are the Pampadevi and Bhuvaneshvari shrines, the two consorts of Virupaksha. Next to it and behind the painted ceiling mandapa, lies the main shrine.

    The lofty rangamandapa which houses the main shrine and is the sanctum sanctorum is an elaborately-decorated affair. The 5-aisle chamber has composite pillars while the 16 pillars of the main rectangle, are replete with decorations. The central aisle rises high up to admit light and fresh air. The ceiling is noteworthy for its intricate paintings which have survived over the centuries and depict scenes from the Hindu epics. In the sanctum is the Virupaksha stone linga. Photography is not permitted inside the sanctum area.

    A flight of steps from the main shrine leads you to the rear of the temple complex. There is a dark chamber on the right-hand side. Enter that room and see the inverted shadow of the main eastern gopuram formed on one wall by a slit on the opposite wall. Also, as you go along, you will come across a shrine dedicated to the sage Vidyaranya. Here also the effect may be viewed.

    First Written: Mar. 01, 2013

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    32-Monolithic Bull

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Mar 1, 2013
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    Once you descend from the Hemakuta Hill, instead of entering the Virupaksha (Pampapati) Temple, if you turn right and walk along the ancient street of the temple, you will see the Monolithic Bull or a huge stone image of Nandi, the sacred bull of Shiva, facing the temple. Framed by the Matanga Hill which rises majestically behind the pavilion, the statue is located at the end of the street under a ruined pavilion.

    Some years ago, the authorities cleared this street of all the unauthorized encroachments and now (Dec. 2102), it presents a look reminiscent of the Car Festival days of yore. Every year in the spring (March-April), thousands of people gather from places as far away as Chennai. On the appointed day, the images of the deities are taken out from the temple and placed inside the chariot. The chariot is then dragged from the temple to the end of the street and back to the temple, a distance of about 800 yards (732 m). The festival marks the annual ritual marriage of the Virupaksha and Pampa. In 2012, the festival was on April 6, 2012.

    (http://thewandercollection.wordpress.com/2012/04/06/virupaksha-car-festival-hampi/).

    The Matanga Hill is inextricably linked to the Hindu epic, 'Ramayana'. Sage Mathanga had his hermitage here. One day, from the Kishkinda (monkey) kingdom nearby, Vali, the monkey prince killed Dundhuvi, the buffalo demon and threw the carcass on this hill. Enraged at this defilement of his holy place, Mathanga cursed Vali that he would never venture to this hill. Later, Vali drove out his brother, Sugriva and Hanuman, his monkey-friend, out of his kingdom. When Rama, the hero of the Hindu epic, came in search of his wife, Sita, who had been abducted by the demon king Ravana and taken to Lanka (Ceylon=Sri Lanka), Sugriva and Hanuman, who had taken refuge in this hill, rendered valuable aid to restore Sita to Rama. As a reward, Rama re-established Sugriva as the monarch of the Kishkinda kingdom.

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    31-Jain Temples-Hemakuta Hill

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Mar 1, 2013
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    After feasting your eyes and your senses on the thrilling sunset from the highest point of Hemakuta Hill, you may still have time to visit the group of Jain temples a bit lower down on your way to the Virupaksha (Pampapati) Temple. Their pyramid-like top is singularly attractive and distinctive. Almost thirty of these shrines dot this slope of the hill.

    This group of shrines belongs to the period before the establishment of the Vijaynagar Empire. Some of them are very simple in style while others are more elaborate, the simpler ones being the older ones in age. It may be dated from the 9th. to the early 14th. century. In one of the shrines facing north, there is an inscription on a pillar recording that the shrine was built by Kampila, the early 14th. century king as a memorial to his parents.

    Historically speaking, during the reign of Bukka Raya, the king was instrumental in reconciling the differences between the Vaishnavas and the Jains, sometime in 1368 AD. He had ordained that, “they should each pursue their own religious practices with equal freedom.” This indicates the presence of the Jain religion here.

    First Written: Mar. 01, 2013

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    30-Sunset Point- Hemakuta Hill

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 28, 2013

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    The official Sunset Point is at the sacred Hemakuta Hill. There is a plaque with a sketch of the places you can see from this vantage point. The best time to visit this place would be in the evening, just before the sun dips below the horizon. You could enjoy the sight and then go down the hill to visit the Virupaksha Temple. A stepped pathway exists that leads you near the temple complex.

    Earlier, the whole hill was fortified with stonewalls but when Krishna Deva Raya ((1509-1530 AD) of the Narasinga dynasty wanted to expand the Virupaksha Temple, a portion of the wall was demolished. Once you are on the top, a large sheet of rock greets you with occasional ups and downs.

    According to Hindu mythology, Pampa, the daughter of Brahma used to religiously take fruits and other condiments to the 'rishis' (holy men) meditating on this hill. Pleased with her attentiveness and her winsome demeanour, the 'rishis' asked her what she wanted as a boon. She is said to have expressed her desire to be the wife of Virupaksha, a form of god Shiva. The 'rishis' then taught her the art of penance which she practised faithfully. This pleased Virupaksha so much that he wed Pampa and became Pampapati or the husband of Pampa. It then rained gold and this agrees with the name of this hill as ‘Hema’ in Sanskrit means, ‘gold’. A temple located at top of this hill is of Veerabhadra, a deity associated with Lord Shiva lineage by the Shivaites.

    There are plenty of shrines on the hill surface dating to the 9th. to the 14th. century AD, that is, pre- and early Vijayanagar era. One of them is the double-storied stone pavilion-like gateway which has stairs leading up to the top. The view from the top of the Tungabhadra valley as well as the sunset is truly fascinating.

    First Written: Feb. 28, 2013

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    29-Kadalaikallu Ganesh Temple

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 28, 2013
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    A little further up as you surmount the hill that drops suddenly into Hampi bazaar, you will find the Kadalaikallu (gram seed) Ganesh Temple, so called owing to the resemblance of the statue’s belly to a mustard seed. Towering at almost 15 ft (4.5 m), hewn out of a single boulder, the statue is housed in a near-classical structure.

    Twenty-four slender and tall pillars, duly decorated with bas relief ("a sculpture technique in which figures and/or other design elements are just barely more prominent than the (overall flat) background") of Hindu gods and goddesses, add a touch of gracefulness to the entire pavilion. The trunk of the structure is nuzzled into a rice cake held in the left hand. The other three arms carry the usual piece of tusk, goad (spiked stick used for driving cattle), noose or rope. The ‘vahan’ or vehicle of transport, the rat, may also be noticed at the base of the statue.

    “The physical attributes of Ganesha are themselves rich in symbolism. He is normally shown with one hand in the abhaya pose of protection and refuge and the second holding a sweet (modaka), symbolic of the sweetness of the realized inner self. In the two hands behind him he often holds an ankusha (elephant goad) and a pasha (noose). The noose is to convey that worldly attachments and desires are a noose. The goad is to prod man to the path of righteousness and truth. With this goad Ganesha can both strike and repel obstacles. His pot belly signifies the bounty of nature and also that Ganesha swallows the sorrows of the Universe and protects the world.”

    (http://www.religionfacts.com/hinduism/deities/ganesha.htm)

    After you view the statue, go out and view the panoramic scene of Hampi laid out before you. The sunset from this point is equally enthralling.

    First Written: Feb. 28, 2013

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    28-Sasivikallu Ganesha

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Feb 28, 2013
    Sasivikallu Ganesha
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    Beyond the Krishna temple and the small Vishnu Temple stands a huge monolithic statue of Lord Ganesha, the one who is worshipped before the start of any endeavour or enterprise, the remover of obstacles. This is the Sasivikallu Ganesha statue.

    He is the son of Shiva and Parvati and is worshipped not only for removal of all obstacles at the beginning of any ‘puja’ or enterprise but also for his intelligence. His ‘vahan’ or vehicle of transport is the rat.

    The statue is almost 8 feet (2.4 m) high and is placed within a raised open-pillared pavilion built by a trader in 1506 AD in honour of Narasimha II (1491-1505 AD). It is located just beyond the Kadalaikallu Ganesha Temple. There is not much of decoration either outside or inside the pavilion.
    He is seated in a half-lotus position while a snake is tied around his huge belly, its hood upraised.

    In his four hands, he carries a part of his broken tusk, goad (spiked stick used for driving cattle), noose or rope and a ‘ladoo’ (sweetmeat). If you walk to the back of the statue, you will be a clear image of the back of a goddess on the main statue’s back. At the base, on the right side as we face the statue, there is a small stone channel for the water and offerings to drip down.

    The statue is affectionately called the Sasivikallu or the ‘Mustard Seed’ owing to the likeness of the stomach of the statue to a mustard seed. The fingers of the left hand and the toes of the left foot of the statue have been repaired recently.

    First Written: Feb. 28, 2013

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    03-Hampi Festivals

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Feb 27, 2013

    If you can time your visit to Hampi to coincide with the set of festivals and festivities listed below, you might make your holiday that much more thrilling. However, do remember that Hampi is unbearably hot from March to October, especially for visitors coming from colder climes.

    Hampi has a set of annual festivals. Some are religious festivals associated with the temples. The others are cultural festivals. Many of them usually attract huge crowds causing a lot of strain on hotel bookings and other amenities. Generally, the dates for these festivals are not fixed. As such, it is advisable to visit the official website of the Karnataka Tourism Department and check for the dates.

    January/February: Purandaradasa Aradhana - A classical musical festival held to commemorate the birthday of the ancient poet Purandaradasa who lived in Hampi. It is a 2 to 3 days' programme held at the Purandaradasa Mandapa near the Vitthala Temple.

    February/March: Sivaratri - This is celebrated in Shiva temples. Here, there is a night-long religious ceremony at the Virupaksha Temple.

    March/April: Virupaksha Car Festival - This is the largest religious festival in Hampi marking the annual ritual marriage of Virupaksha (Shiva) to Pampa. The image of the deities are placed on two giant chariots and taken to the end of the street and brought back.

    October: Diwali or Deepavali or the Festival of Lights - Along with the rest of the country, Diwali is celebrated with fireworks in Hampi in a grand manner. Hampi Bazaar is the main area for the celebrations.

    November: Hampi Festival or Vijaya Utsav or Hampi Utsav- Generally held in the first week of Nov., it last for 3 days. It showcases the cultural heritage of the place and its people. Most of the ruins are lit up at night, turning the entire city into an ethereal experience.

    December: Phalapuja Festival - This is held at the Virupaksha temple to mark the ceremonial betrothal of the divine couple.

    First Written: Feb. 27, 2013

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    27-Krishna Temple

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Feb 27, 2013
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    The Krishna Temple is located on a higher ground just beyond the Lakshmi Narasimha Shrine and the Badavilinga on the left-hand side of the road as you go up. It was built in 1513 AD by Krishna Deva Raya to install the image of Bala-Krishna (young Krishna) which he had lifted from a temple in Udayagiri in Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh to commemorate his successful expedition in Orissa.

    Facing east, this temple is on a raised platform with a highly-decorated archway, door jambs and doors. There is a pillared verandah, smaller shrines and a large courtyard within the temple premises. On one of the pillars, all the ten avatars of Lord Vishnu have been carved, including that of Kalki, the future avatar of the Lord.

    The various incarnations over the aeons is Matsya (the fish), Kurma (the tortoise), Varaha (the Boar), Narashima (giant lion man), Vamana (the dwarf), Parasurama (Ram with the axe), Sri Krishna (central character of the epic, ‘Mahabharata’), Buddha, finally, Rama (central character of the epic, ‘Ramayana’) and Kalki (next avatar of Vishnu).

    Battle scenes have been sculpted on the western wall of the temple. On the underside of one of the lintels, a hare sits on a full moon with two snakes, one on either side. Beautiful maidens have also been carved on the door jambs. A granary is situated towards the rear of the temple.

    Immediately opposite this temple, on low grounds, is a large flat land where a bustling market once stood. This bazaar was held every Monday and was meant for groceries. In between was a broad road where once the temple car festival used to take place.

    First Written: Feb. 27, 2013

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    26-Lakshmi Narasimha Shrine

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 27, 2013
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    The Lakshmi Narasimha Shrine is located on the road to Hampi, close to the Badavilinga Shrine. It was sculpted around 1528 AD when King Krishna Deva Raya gave a grant to this shrine. It is said that the deity was fashioned by a Brahmana.

    It represents the fourth avatar of Lord Vishnu, Narasimha, which means ‘giant lion man’. Made of a huge monolithic boulder, it is 22 feet (6.7 m) high and is enclosed by a high wall on all four sides. Only a fenced doorway has been left to view this magnificent sculpture.

    Much damage has been done to this piece of monument. Of the four arms, only two are visible and that too in a damaged condition. The figure of goddess Lakshmi, sitting on the left lap of Lord Vishnu, is also missing. Only Her right hand entwined around the waist of Lord Vishnu remains. A bangle on the wrist and a bracelet on the upper arm, next to the elbow joint, may also be discerned. Owing to the absence of the roof, the face has also weathered quite a few storms.

    Whatever is left is still magnificent. Lakshmi Narasimha sits on top of Adishesha, His guardian serpent in the yogic lotus position. The seven hoods of His serpent form a canopy over His head. On top of this canopy is a Kirthimukha Torana, a form of gargoyle or a rain water sprout, symbolic of 'Makara', a sea-creature in Hindu mythology. Normally depicted as half-animal and half-aquatic creature, ‘makara’ is the vehicle of the goddess of the Ganges and the sea god Varuna. It is also used in the top arches of Hindu and Buddhist temples. In this case, the nostrils may have acted as the gargoyle.

    The broad band that supports the knee of the sculpture is a new addition or restoration. This band was also desecrated by the Muslim hordes in 1565 AD as may be seen in the original picture which forms the cover of A.L. Longhurst’s brilliant book, ‘Hampi Ruins – Described and Illustrated’, first published in 1917 AD.

    TRIVIA: Makara' is a Sanskrit word which means "sea dragon" or "water-monster" and in Tibetan language it is called the "chu-srin", and also denotes a hybrid creature. It is the origin of the word for crocodile 'mugger' (मगर) in Hindi. The English word 'mugger' evolved meaning one who sneaks up and attacks another. The name is applied to the Mugger crocodile, the most common crocodile in India, and is descriptive of its aggressive feeding behavior.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makara_(Hindu_mythology)

    First Written: Feb. 27, 2013

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    02-Suggested Itinerary

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Feb 27, 2013

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    Your itinerary of the Hampi ruins may not fit the one suggested here but an attempt has been made to reduce criss-crossing and to lead you seamlessly from one ruin to the other depending upon your place of stay. While the Royal Enclosure, the Religious Centre and the Vitthala Temple form the three main clusters of ruins, there are other equally interesting sights which fall outside these clusters.

    The best area to stay is at Hampi itself. Unfortunately, the accommodation here may not be to your liking as these are mainly geared for the backpackers and pilgrims who visit Hampi during the various festivals of the temple. If you stay here, your starting point may be the Virupaksha or Pampapati Temple. From there you may visit the Manmatha tank, exit the temple complex and begin your ascent up the Hemakuta hill. Once you surmount the hill and enjoy the panoramic view, you may view the Sasivekalu Ganesha, the Kadalekalu Ganesha and proceed to the Krishna Temple. From there, you continue downhill to the Narasimha statue and to the nearby Badavilinga. Further down, you will come across Uddana Virabhadra temple and further afield, a chhatra or feeding house. If you continue towards Kamalapura village, the Sisters Stones will catch your eye followed by the Octagonal Fountain and the Bhojan Shala (outdoor picnic spot). As you trudge along, you will see the Underground Temple and the Noblemen’s Enclosure. Next could be the Zenana Enclosure with its Watch Towers, Queen’s Palace and Lotus Mahal. Exiting from this Enclosure, you will see the Parade ground fronting the Elephant’s Stables and the Guardsmen’s Quarters. You can then make your way to the Hazararama Temple and then enter the Royal Enclosure to view the king’s Audience Hall, the Underground Shrine, the Public Bath, the Aqueduct and the Mahanavami Dibba. As you exit, you will see the mammoth stone doors lying on the ground. Nearby would be the Queen’s Bath, the Chandrashekhara Temple and the Octagonal Bath. The Archaeological Museum is nearby and so is the Pattabhirama temple. Bhima’s Gate lies further ahead and past the Ganagitti temple. You may then climb up the Malyavanta hill, watch the sunset and see the rows of lingas carved on the surface of a boulder, next to a Raghunatha temple. You may like to take the trouble of visiting the Domed Gate also before proceeding to the Vitthala Temple complex. Once you are done with the temple, go to the side and view the fine King’s Balance also. As you return on the road to Hampi, you may also like to see Sugriva’s Cave and the Narasimha temple. Further ahead is the Achutaraya’s temple. A short walk and you can visit the Kodandarama temple and some rare riverside sculptures. At a short distance may be seen the starting point, the Virupaksha temple. Before returning to it, a slight detour to explore Matanga hill may be in order.

    If your accommodation is at Hospet, you may like to take the left fork on entering the outskirts of Hampi, go past the Muhammadan Tombs to the Royal Enclosure, the Zenana Enclosure, then to the Sacred or Religious Centre and continue to the Vitthala Temple Complex. You may then see the Malyavanta hill before returning to Hospet past Bhima’s Gate and the Domed Gate.

    If your accommodation is at Kamalapur, then visit Bhima’s Gate and the Domed Gate before going towards the Royal Enclosure, the Zenana Enclosure and then to the Vitthala Temple Complex. You could then take the short walk to visit the Kodandarama temple and some rare riverside sculptures.

    First Written: Feb. 27, 2013

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    25-Badavilinga Shrine

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 25, 2013
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    The Badavi linga (large linga) is a small shrine next to the Narasimha statue. Two flat stones over a drain help you cross over from Narasimha statue side to this shrine.

    Hewn out of a monolithic rock 10 feet (3 m) high, the equally large circular pedestal of this linga is permanently under water. It is housed inside a stone chamber shrine with a damaged roof which is topped like a regular Hindu temple. A square hole on top of the linga allows sunlight and rain into the shrine.

    It is no longer possible to enter the sanctum sanctorum owing to a locked iron grill.

    First Written: Feb. 26, 2013

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    24-Underground Temple

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 25, 2013
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    Near the Danaik’s Enclosure is the Underground Temple, also known as the Prasanna Virupaksha (delighted Virupaksha) temple, dedicated to Siva. It is a large temple and now stands proudly on one side of the road after the silt and debris of centuries have been removed.

    It appears that the temple was purposely built at a low level, below road level, so that the linga would be surrounded by water, almost like the one next to the Narasimha statue. The temple has a number of nagakals (image of snakes sculpted on stones) within its premises. Owing to its proximity to the Royal Enclosure, it is presumed that this temple was used by the royal family as Virupaksha was the royal family’s deity.

    First Written: Feb. 26, 2013

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    23-Noblemen's Quarters

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 25, 2013
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    The Noblemen's Quarters were excavated at the same time as the Stepped Tank within the Royal Enclosure and is close to the Underground Temple. These residential quarters of the elite in the Vijayanagar kingdom are best viewed from a large boulder which has some 20 steps, with railings, leading to a natural platform. From this vantage point, not only the ruins below but also the entire cityscape of the kingdom may be seen.

    Spread out along a valley below the rocky hills, the structures are rectangular in shape with raised platforms. Only the masonry basement remains the wooden structure being razed to the ground during the five months of the Muslim conquerors depredations in 1565. Some 15 structure can be discerned from this viewpoint. There are remains also of water channels and of a well-laid out plan for the entire cluster of palaces.

    If the mood seizes you, you may go in for a closer look and walk amongst the ruins.

    If you look around, you will notice a huge boulder with deep holes in a vertical line running from the top to its bottom. This is the way the Vijayanagar masons split these mammoth boulders for their use. Water would be poured into the holes regularly. The heat of the day combined with the cold of the night would ensure expansion and contraction till the boulder split wide open.

    First Written: Feb. 26, 2013

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    22-Guard’s Quarters

    by anilpradhanshillong Written Feb 25, 2013
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    Next to the Elephant’s Stables, facing south is the Guard’s Quarters. This is on a raised platform with a single flight of steps leading to a landing and then one branching off the left and the other to the right. Two stone elephants guard the entrance. Both are mutilated. This is the only entrance and exit. The eleven arched doorways in the front of the structure are similar in design to the entrances to the compartments of the Elephant’s Stables.

    Once you come to the floor of the rectangular building, you will notice an open central portion. This is surrounded on all four sides by long corridors which may have been parcelled off into small room through mud walls.

    The purpose of this structure is variously described as Guard’s Quarters, Treasury, Concert Hall as well as a place for exhibition of martial arts. Whatever may have been its use then, currently it houses artifacts and acts as a museum of the local office of the Archeological Survey of India. The timings are 10 am to 5 pm with Fridays being the weekly off.

    First Written: Feb. 26, 2013

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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