Fun things to do in Mysore

  • Tipu's summer palace
    Tipu's summer palace
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Mysore

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    Belur/Halebed/Shravanbelagola/mysore

    by mallyak Updated May 8, 2007

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    Belur - a jewel of south Indian architectureis located about 17km SW of Halebed in hasaan district.The Chennakeshava temple is the main attraction here depicting Hoyasala architecture.The entire surface of the grey-green structure is cvered with richly textured releif carvings of female dancers, elephants and musicians.
    Halebed is set among lush vegetationwas the hoyasala capital in the 13th centurywith the principal attraction being the Hoysaleshwara temple
    Shravanbelagola is a small town situated between two granite hills-Indragiri and Chandra giri.It is dominated by the colossal 17.7 metres high monolithic statue of Gommateshwara.
    The easiest way to see these 3 sights in Karnatak astate is to take a private taxi to the City of Hassan from were Shravanbelagola is not far and would take about 3 hours to climb to the top admire the spectacular scenary and the Statue and climb down.It might be worth while to spend the night at Hassan an d the next day take the trip to Belur /halebed and Mysore.
    Mysore , the capital of the Wodeyar rulers , is a sleepy laid back city .Several elegant buildings enhance the wide tree lined streets.
    In the heart of the city is the Amba Vilas palace with the jagmohan palce to the west.Photograpghy is not allowed inside the palaces
    The Cathedral of st .philomenas is a neo Gothic structure reputed to be the tallest church in the world is worth a visit.
    A visit to chamundi hills is well worth the trip with a Nandi cow monolith dating to 1659 is half way up the hill.

    Mysore city Palace BelurChennakeshava temple Hoysaleshwara temple entrance Statue of Gomateshwara at Sravana Belagola

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    Mysore - Railway Museum

    by mallyak Written Feb 12, 2008

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    The first of its kind in India, the Rail Museum was set up in 1979. Situated at Krishnaraja Sagar Road, the museum sets a good pattern for regional display and has a good collection. The highlight here is the Chamundi Gallery that showcases a unique and interesting collection of photographs and paintings depicting the development of the railways. Don't miss the Sri Ranga Pavilion, which has two royal coaches. They belonged to the Maharaja of Mysore and have a certain old-world charm about them, harking back to a time when royalty travelled in splendour. Most of the exhibits in the museum once graced the Mysore palace.

    The first of its kind in India, the Rail Museum was set up in 1979. Situated at Krishnaraja Sagar Road, the museum sets a good pattern for regional display and has a good collection. The highlight here is the Chamundi Gallery that showcases a unique and interesting collection of photographs and paintings depicting the development of the railways. Don't miss the Sri Ranga Pavilion, which has two royal coaches. They belonged to the Maharaja of Mysore and have a certain old-world charm about them, harking back to a time when royalty travelled in splendour. Most of the exhibits in the museum once graced the Mysore palace.



    The particular interest is the Maharani's saloon carriage that boasts of a kitchen, dining car unit and a royal toilet dating back to 1899. One of the first steam engines built, it is indeed remarkably well kept. There is also a battery-operated mini-train, which takes you for a fancy ride along the grounds

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    Durbar Hall

    by cadzand Written Feb 21, 2005

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    The majestic Durbar Hall with its ornate ceiling and sculpted pillars and the Marriage Pavilion with its chandeliers, cast-iron pillars and Belgian stained glass arranged in peacock designs in the domed ceilings are the main attractions. Make sure you see the magnificent jewel-studded golden throne, the pride of the Wodeyars and the symbol of their sovereignty.

    the Durbar hall
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    The Amba Vilasa Hall

    by cadzand Updated Feb 24, 2005

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    The Ambasavila, is the most gorgeously decorated hall, with a harmonious composition in colours. The floor, in between the pillars is inlaid with Agra work. The teak-wood ceiling too is magnificent having bold an intricate carving designs. Every door, silver, teak and rosewood with ivory inlay, has charming decorative designs, depicting the ten incarnations of Vishnu.

    No pictures may be taken inside the palace. This is a scan of a postcard. Sorry for the bad quality of the picture.

    At the entrance you can buy a visitor’s guide and a set of postcards for Rs 50

    The Amba Vilasa Hall
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    Souvenirs

    by cadzand Updated Feb 24, 2005

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    If you like to buy some souvenirs as there are sandalwood elephants, boxes, beautifully carved wooden boxes with or without cupper engraving, don’t hesitate, take the opportunity. On top of the Chamundi Hill there are loads of vendors. The quality is good and the prices here are much lower than in the official shops.Don't forget the bargaining.
    Thirsty ? buy you a delicious fresh coconut with the juice for a few Rps

    sandalwood

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    Flower and Veg Market

    by muddybok Updated Feb 19, 2006

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    Not many guide books nor web pages mentioned about this market. Lonely Planet however did stating this place as quite interesting, but to a shutter happy guys like me it's almost heaven.

    In here, you'll see many activities starting from morning till slightly past noon. If you are happened to be here before 9am, you will get to see flower auction at the left-side of the market starting from the main entrance of the market.

    The sellers will bring their "flower balls" wrapping in the clothes and arranged nicely awaiting for the auctioneer to conduct the auction. While the auction is carried out, the potential buyer will test out how compact the flower ball is and purchase for their retail business purposes.

    There are some stores selling strings of flower rings ready to be used for worshipping purposes. You will see lots of bees flying around those flowers especially those that made of jasmine.

    Flower Auction Flower ball for Wholesales & Auction Flower ball for Wholesales & Auction
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    Color (Gulal) and smell

    by muddybok Updated Feb 22, 2006

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    In Mysore, sandalwood (or oil) will be one single item that you aught to buy because they are mostly produced here. Of course not all sandalwood oil on sales is totally pure without adding other substances. You're encouraged to purchase sandalwood oils from government joints to ensure its purity and quality of those sandalwood products.

    umashanker wrote:
    Gulal is a perfumed powder that is offered to godess.These colored powder is part of Sringar and symbol of joy we put on our forehead too and throw in air in relegious processions as a gesture of Joy.

    In South India, there is a tradition of making beautiful Rangoli (floor decorations) by South Indian women using gulal. Rangloi of Gujrat is also famous for thier traditional patterns.

    These stores will normally sell incense as well. You will be most likely to be approached by store takers for buying incense with them. I must say that most of these incense smell really great and no harm getting some if you can strike a good deal.

    Gulal Gulal and incense store
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    Postcard Browsing

    by muddybok Updated Mar 20, 2006

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    You might have read & rated this tip in other India pages of mine. You may skip it if you already read about this.


    Besides planning your train/bus tickets properly while you're on your South India trip, I personally feel that postcard browsing on 1st postcard selling boy approaching you (of course got to be after you settle for your lodging) is not necessary a bad idea.

    I happened to travel with a very seasoned backpacking and well planning travel mate with almost 80% planned out before we're arriving at the destination. Postcard browsing will help you to complete the remaining 20% (if not more) when you're in that particular town.

    Most postcard sellers will carry localized and specific postcards around the location (say 100-200KM radius) and you'll get to spot some "must see"s impromptu and also pick up some great photographic themes and they are most likely to be your most memorable thing for that town/location.

    This is especially true for traveling in a subcontinent like India where missing a particular spot may means that you may miss it forever. Please do not get me wrong that India is a bad place to travel. India does not get the "Incredible India" as the travel slogan for no reason. It's a beautiful country, but other factors such as air pollution, difficulty for arrange for train tickets and such will deter you from returning to India just to complete what you've just missed in your previous trip.

    So, get the most out of that single trip. If you really like certain postcards, you may help the postcard boy financially but do remember to strike the best deal for those cards.

    Chamundi Hill The Mysore Palace Sweet stuffs Colors
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    The Chamundeshwari temple

    by cadzand Updated Feb 21, 2005

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    Mysore city was the capital of the old royal Mysore province. The word Mysore expands to "Mahishasurana Ooru" which means the town of Mahishasura.
    The story goes that the demon Mahishasura was killed by goddess Chamundeshwari or Durga atop the Chamundi hill near Mysore, hence the name. A colorful image of the demon greets us as we reach the summit of the hill.

    Mahishasura the demon
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    Yellow cows ??

    by cadzand Written Feb 21, 2005

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    Cows are not unusual in India. Everyone knows. Only why are they yellow with blue horns ?
    When the harvest is over, the people express their gratitude to the gods, the earth and their cattle. For four days, they celebrate with abandon and worship with devotion.
    Pongal festivities continue through the first four days of the Tamil month of Thai (mid-January to mid-February). The houses are cleaned, painted and decorated. People wear new clothes and the cattle are gaily caparisoned with beads, bells and flowers-their horns painted and capped with gleaming metals.
    Voilà that's why.

    Yellow cows

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  • muddybok's Profile Photo

    Vegs & Melons

    by muddybok Updated Feb 19, 2006

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    Sorry if I am too carried away with flowers and incense in this market. The vegetables and fruits section somehow give you a very good photographic themes of taking them in clustered arrangement. Of course people watching in this market will also make you see many interesting local lives and purchasing behaviors.

    During my visit, I realized that most customers buying in big volume for everything. That includes chilies, vegetables & melons, as if they are buying to feed big household or for business purposes. Some of them even carry their purchases in big gunny sacks.

    Also seek approval from veg sellers before taking their photo and what they sale. I realised that most Muslim sellers are most likely to deny you from taking their photos, but the younger store keepers will dying to get themselves imprint into your camera films or space.

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    Big Banyan Tree

    by Pete.Gibson Written Oct 24, 2005

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    This extraordinary tree which has spread to cover an area of over 3 acres is over 400 years old, and is a popular picnic spot for locals, The banyan is a species of tropical fig it develops aerial roots which grow down from the branches once they reach the ground they root and form into thick stems, allowing the tree to spread over a large area

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    Shwetha Varahaswami Temple

    by cadzand Written Feb 23, 2005

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    Thi 18th century temple is one of 12 that lie within the palace grounds. It is dedicated to the Varaha incarnation of Vishnu. The 5-story gopura is whitewashed; the only figural sculptures are dvarapalas flanking the openings, and guardian faces on the top story.

    Temple inside the Palace
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    Monkey Business

    by Pete.Gibson Written Oct 24, 2005

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    The Banyan tree not only has a broad leaf canopy which is cool and refreshing it also bears a reddish brown fruit, so you get all kind of animals and birds living in it, Squirrels, bats, rats, snakes, owls, crows, and of course Monkeys who also love the many twisting branches

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    Hoysala Temples at Somnathpur

    by Canadienne Written Apr 10, 2003

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    Somnathpur, home to the one of the last Hoysala temples, is located about 10 km from Mysore. The temple was built in the 13th century and the detail in the stonework is amazing. . .

    . . .but, the temples in Madurai and Chennai are much more lively and fun!

    Detail at Somnathpur Temple
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Mysore Things to Do

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