Kochi Shopping

  • Street near Old Jew Town
    Street near Old Jew Town
    by ranger49
  • Food stall in the shade
    Food stall in the shade
    by ranger49
  • idiom book store
    idiom book store
    by PierreZA

Most Recent Shopping in Kochi

  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    From Bargain Hunting to Expensive Shopping

    by aussirose Updated Apr 12, 2014
    aussirose parts with lots of money in Fort Kochi
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    From bargain hunting to expensive shopping. Yes we got sucked in :o)

    This is a ploy of the local tuk tuk drivers when they take you sight seeing. We ended up spending more than what we wanted to, but still got a bargain compared to buying jewellery with precious gems back in Australia.

    Remember before saying no to your friendly tuk tuk driver, whenever you visit one of these places they will give the tuk tuk driver a petrol voucher and petrol is expensive in Kerala. You can always buy something little. I bought a nice little painted copper bowl from the last shop that would have cost around $12AUS. But be prepared to say a firm 'No' if they try to show you the expensive jewellery if you do not really want to fork out a lot of cash ;o)

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Luxury Travel
    • Photography

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  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    For Bargain Hunters: Market Stalls Fort Kochi by aussirose

    by aussirose Written Apr 12, 2014
    Markets opposite Chinese Fishing Nets Fort Kochi
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    Being a big fan of batik hippy pants, I couldn't wait to go shopping for a bargain. The markets along the foreshore at the Chinese Fishing Nets were a great place to start. These markets are great for bargain shoppers like me :o)

    The 3rd photo is of more batik pants shops around the corner from the Vasco De Gama House.
    4th and 5th photos are of a nice little shop opposite the Santa Cruz Basilica. Hubby even purchased some cool Indian pants and shirts. They will also cut the sleeves off for you and re-sew them if you don't like them long.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Budget Travel
    • Women's Travel

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  • Sofi Arts & Crafts: Beautiful Kashmiri Arts & Crafts in Fort Cochin

    by Christine74 Written Oct 25, 2011
    Sofi Arts & Crafts

    When I was Fort Cochin this year I randomly entered Sofi Arts & Crafts, a small shop on Quiros Street. I ended up staying and talking to the owner a long time and I bought some beautiful scarves. The owner, Sofi, is a 28 year old Kashmiri. He surprised me with his honesty and the different (not pushy!) way in which he worked. This was certainly a relief from most shops and sellers!

    Sofi is starting up his own business this year. During summer he travelled al through Kashmir and bought his stock directly from the families who make the scarves, wall hangings and other arts and crafts that he wants to sell in his shop.

    In Fort Cochin there are a lot of shops selling scarves and other Kashmiri arts and crafts. Why is this one different? Because Sofi is his own boss and is trying to start a business. He does not work for commission and he does not get told of when he doesn't sell anything. Because Sofi only sells quality, nothing bought from factories. And most of all, because Sofi will not lie and rather sells something too cheaply than for a rip off price.

    What to pay: Hard to say, Sofi sells small silk scarves for a few hundred rupees, but also beautiful delicate woollen scarves for thousands of rupees.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Luxury Travel
    • Backpacking

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  • Amay: Natural, social, bio, recycled, handmade etc

    by ladybird72 Updated Nov 13, 2010

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    Shop front of Amay
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    To start with, the shop is in an old warehouse with a lovely little space to sit outside under a mango tree. Most of the display furniture is recycled using old tyres, wooden doors and window frames, fruit boxes etc.
    You will find a nice selection of natural incense, soaps, essential oils, perfumed sachets, anti-mosquito products and Spirulina.
    There are bags, raw silk scarves, bangles, bindis, greeting cards and postcards, T-shirts and recycled goods.
    You can re-fill your plastic bottles with filtered water for INR 5 per liter to save on that plastic waste.
    Some of the products are sourced from NGO’s or associations and a percentage of their sales helps an NGO working to help destitute children.
    There is also a giant chess board in one corner of the shop which can be played on.

    What to buy: The natural and bio products are always good to buy. If you want to cover your body in mosquito repellent for example, it's better to have a natural product than something chemical even if you have to pay a little extra.
    Also most of the products are from South India and use local produce which is good for the environment.

    What to pay: I think nothing exceeds about INR 600 and that's for the silk scarves.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography
    • Budget Travel

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  • ranger49's Profile Photo

    Many kinds of Retail outlets.: Arts, Crafts and Foods

    by ranger49 Written Jan 1, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Food stall in the shade
    3 more images

    There were plenty of opportunities to shop. I was interested mainly in buying local crafts, spices and textiles. We were strongly cautioned against buying food to eat "on the hoof" but I could not resist fresh coconuts.The milk was deliscious and there were no ill effects.
    As well as properly organised road side stalls there were also many hawkers and pedlars selling trashy "gift" items and dubious strings of spices.
    We were directed to a busy shopping street on the way to the Jewish quarter where there were lots of shops of all description.
    We found a large emporium run by the Kerala Handicrafts Development Society where I found everything I Wantedat reasonable marked prices - no haggling!

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Antique Shops: More like museums!

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 21, 2009
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    There are a whole load of antique shops around the synagogue in an area known as Jew Town. They're more like museums that shops with items such as furniture, ornaments, masks, doors, statues on display. One had a 100ft, 100 year old snake racing boat down the entire length of the shop!

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Incy Bella, The Book Shop: Books

    by PierreZA Written Nov 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Incy Bella

    This shop, like Idiom Books, do have a very good selection of books. Books on India, Kerala, Cooking Books, but it seems that they have a very good selection on the Religions practiced in Kerala and Cochin (eg Judaism in Cochin).

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Along Bazaar Rd: Buying Spices

    by PierreZA Written Nov 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bazaar Rd

    There are many shops along Bazaar Rd, selling spices, pulses etc. I found that it was much cheaper to buy here than in Jew Town, where everything is more tourist-orientated.
    Some are actually whole-salers, but there are plenty shops selling small quantities.

    What to buy: Black pepper, chillies, cardomom, cassia, etc

    What to pay: Inexpensive

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Any around Jew Town: Antiques and junk

    by suvanki Updated Dec 30, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Warehouses and shops in Jew town are packed to the rafters with antiques and curios.

    They attract collectors and interior designers from around the globe as well as the tourist looking for an unusual momento of their visit. Carved panels reclaimed from churches and other grand buildings jostle with pottery and other articles of Chinese/ Portuguese/ Dutch/ British origin.
    Spice boxes, jewellery and masks make popular gifts

    What to buy: Antiques

    Jewellery

    Spices

    What to pay: Bargaining is expected. - as little as You want, to What You and Your Bank Manager are happy with!

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Luxury Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • BlueLlama's Profile Photo

    Idiom: Superb selection of books

    by BlueLlama Written May 13, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    All the books on India and Kerala you could possibly want. No hassle to buy anything but the owner was very helpful when asked for assistance. You get a nice raffia bag with the shop's logo to take all your purchases home in.

    What to buy: I bought a couple of books from Idiom but my best purchase was a print of one of the wall paintings from Mattancherry Palace. The shops had a large stack of prints available from the Palace and it was great to be able to take home one of the paintings I had admired the previous day.

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  • IoannaE's Profile Photo

    Ernakulam market area: The perfumes of the bazaar

    by IoannaE Updated Apr 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Spice shop, Ernakulam market

    Indian markets are an experience: bustle, noise, colours, smells, all stronger than you thought possible. I rarely buy anything, preferring to just soak it all in, but Cochin was an exception. The main market area of the Spice Capital of India features many hole-in-the-wall spice shops. No need to look for them, the wafting aromas will guide you there....

    What to buy: Star anise, huge blades of mace, big strips of cinnamon, fresh black pepper, big red chillis and exotica like kodampoli (a souring agent used in Kerala dishes - can replace lemon juice or tamarind).

    What to pay: Saffron and cardamom are expensive. Compare prices and bargain – traders know what an attraction their spices are to foreigners.

    Buy saffron strands, not powdered saffron - it’s always adulterated.

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Silk and sarees

    by PierreZA Updated Mar 30, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Textile shop in ernakulam

    There are several shops along MG Road in Ernakulam where you can buy textiles, silk and sarees. There is a much bigger variety compared to Fort Cochin, and also cheaper. It is here where the locals do shopping, thus no inflated prices.

    What to buy: Silk and other textiles

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Idiom Book Shop: Books

    by PierreZA Updated Mar 29, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    idiom book store
    1 more image

    There are 2 branches of this book store in Fort Cochin. One off Napier Street and the other just as you enter Jew Town.
    This book store has a fantastic range of books on India, and especially Kerala.
    Worth visiting!

    What to buy: Books on Kerala, including arts, architecture and cooking.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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  • tayloretc's Profile Photo

    Cotton Emporium & Stitching Center: Clothing in an Hour

    by tayloretc Written Mar 5, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are a lot of places in Fort Kochi that offer stitching in an hour. The hour usually refers to kurtas, simple drawstring trousers, and the like. This place stitched me three salwar trousers overnight, which was pretty impressive. The stitching was good and the size was correct (I had left a sample), and although the inside seams weren’t all finished they haven’t come apart after a dozen washings. Cost was Rs350 per pair, including material, which I thought was reasonable. The people in the shop were very nice and accommodating. They have a selection of ready-mades too.

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  • tayloretc's Profile Photo

    Various Dealers: Antiques and Reproductions

    by tayloretc Updated Mar 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The streets leading to the Pardesi Synagogue are lined with antiques stores – heck, there are antique stores and warehouses all through that area, and a few near Vasco de Gama’s house, and more at random places all over Fort Kochi. It looks like every piece of antique anything in India has made its way here. (You have to wonder how, and what could possibly be left in the rest of India.) You can buy elaborately carved walls, entire ceilings, a real snake boat, or any of millions of little items, from wall brackets to spice boxes to tiny bronze and carved wood temple offerings.

    Wandering through the stores is a lot of fun, most of the time. There are a few where browsers are tailed by overly “helpful” employees, and more than one tried to pass off a reproduction as something much more valuable. A couple of tips: 1) legally, you can’t take anything out of India that’s more than 100 years old; 2) if a shopkeeper claims something is more than 100 years old and still tries to sell it to you it’s probably a reproduction (unless you’ve identified yourself as a real collector or an interior decorator). If you don’t know what to look for, refrain from buying.

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Kochi Shopping

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