Mattancherry Palace, Kochi

4 out of 5 stars 11 Reviews

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  • Mattancherry Palace
    Mattancherry Palace
    by Donna_in_India
  • Mattancherry Palace
    Mattancherry Palace
    by Donna_in_India
  • Mattancherry Palace
    Mattancherry Palace
    by Donna_in_India
  • cadzand's Profile Photo

    The Dutch Palace or Mattancherry Palace

    by cadzand Updated Mar 8, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dutch palace entrance

    The Dutch palace at Mattancherry was actually built by the Portuguese in 1557. The extensions of the east and south and the wooden ceilings of the Coronation Hall were incorporated by the Dutch hence its other name, the “Dutch Palace”.

    The most important feature and the real glory of this palace, is the astonishing murals in the bedchambers and other rooms, which depict scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata legends connected with Shiva, Vishnu, Krishna, Kumara and Durga. In one of the bedchambers you can see the entire story of Ramayana on the walls.

    These murals are undoubtedly some of the most beautiful and extensive to be seen anywhere in India.

    What a pity no pictures are allowed to be taken inside the palace and no booklet was available at the desk.

    The palace is open all days for the public between 10 am and 5 pm except on Fridays and National Holidays.

    While you're here, take the opportunity to visit the nearby Jewish Town, a single street of old discoloured buildings

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Mattancherry Palace

    by PierreZA Written Nov 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance to the Dutch Palace

    This palace was built by the Portuegese in the mid-1500's.
    It is called the Dutch Palace, as it was renovated by the Dutch in 1663. The museum is being upgraded at this stage, but you can still visit.
    Most outstanding for me: the Hindu murals with amazing detail of Hindu scenes.
    No photography allowed.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • muddybok's Profile Photo

    Dutch Palace

    by muddybok Updated Feb 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dutch Palace Exterior

    The Dutch Palace was originally built by the Portugese in 17th century. The Dutch modified it and presented to the Raja of Kochi. Coronation of many Rajas of Kochi were held here. The place has a fine collection of mural paintings the scenes from the Hindu epics Mahabharatha and Ramayana.

    The museum does not allow photography partly to prevent discoloring of drawings from all the camera flashing. From my travel experience, I saw a lot of visitors do not know how to prevent their camera from flashing, be it in the museum, aquarium or even the night safari.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Mattancherry Palace aka The Dutch Palace

    by suvanki Updated Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Constructed by the Portuguese in 1555. This palace is set in walled gardens, containing mango trees.

    The Portuguese presented the palace to the Cochin Raja, Veera Kerala Varma, as a goodwill gesture (or to assist in their bid for trading supremacy)

    Dutch occupation around 1663, resulted in huge renovation work, and thereafter it became known as the Dutch Palace.

    Open Sat - Thursday, 1000 - 1700.
    Free entrance, but donations may be requested.
    Photography is not permitted.
    Guide book on sale.

    A Hindu Temple is situated in the quadrangular courtyard.

    The central hall, originally the coronation hall, has exhibits of costumes and headgear of the Rajas. The ceilings are made of carved Teak.

    Hindu Wallpaintings, depicting the epics of Mahabharata and Ramayana adorn the walls.
    These murals are considered to be one of the wonders of India.

    Downstairs in the ladies bedchamber are examples of erotic indian art, some have been considered controversial, especially one depicting Vishnu and Shiva!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Mattancherry Palace

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 21, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Built by the Portuguese in 1557, the Mattancherry Palace is an oriental architectural delight. It is also known as the Dutch Palace as the Dutch renovated it in 1663.

    The palace is a double storied quadrangular building, surrounding a central courtyard containing a Hindu temple (see next tip). It has an impressive picture gallery with 17th century murals, depicting scenes from the Indian mythologies. The palace also displays the dresses, turbans, weapons, and palanquins of Rajas of Kochi.

    Open: 10am-5pm except on Fridays and National Holidays. Photography is not permitted.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Dutch Palace Fort Kochi by aussirose

    by aussirose Updated Apr 20, 2014

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mattanchery Dutch Palace Fort Kochi by aussirose
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    Not being much into churches and temples I did want to give the Dutch Palace a squiz and enjoyed it.

    It is really cheap to enter and I liked the big rooms and high ceilings as well as the lovely big pictures of the Rajas that inhabited it. Check the link below for the full history.

    I would recommend a visit here. The drive to the Palace through Jew Town is nice too. (Check out my video). Jew Town is a hub of bustling activity. I am glad that we drove through as I am sure that if we had have walked it we would have been pounced on by many hawkers trying to sell their wares. As it was, we encountered a few at the Dutch Palace but they were courteous and not too pushy. I bought a colourful pen and a tuk tuk toy for the grandson and hubby bought an interesting copper compass.

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Mattancherry Palace

    by Donna_in_India Written Mar 11, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mattancherry Palace
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    Mattancherry Palace, also known as Dutch Palace, was constructed in the mid-1550s by the Portuguese. It was given to the Maharaja of Kochi in exchange for trading rights. It was renovated by the Dutch in 1663, thus the misnomer, Dutch Palace.

    Today Mattancherry Palace is a museum and a protected monument. Inside the museum is a rare collection of vivid murals and royal artifacts including coronation robes and weaponry. The central Durbar Hall is where coronation ceremonies were once held. Today it is the portrait gallery of the Kochi rulers.

    In the chambers and bedrooms adjacent to Durbar Hall are 17th century murals. The Hindu temple art depicts religious and mythological themes as well as episodes from the Ramayana, one of the two great Indian epics.

    Definitely worth a visit!

    Open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday-Thursday (closed Friday).

    Entrance fee Rs 5. Children up to 15 are free.

    No photos allowed.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Avieira67's Profile Photo

    The Dutch Palace

    by Avieira67 Updated Jul 7, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This monument was built by the Portuguese in 1557 as a gift to the Raja of Cochin, Veera Kerala Varma, partly as a compensation for a temple they destroyed and partly as a bribe to gain favors from the ruler. In 1663, the Dutch won over from the Portuguese and the palace was renovated.
    This palace is notable for some of the best mythological murals in India, particularly in the bed chambers. In that room one can see the entire story of Ramayana on the walls. The palace also contains rare examples of traditional Kerala flooring, which looks like polished black marble but is actually a mixture of burned coconut shells, charcoal, lime, plant juices and egg whites.

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    Mantancherry Palace

    by kentishgirl Updated Apr 7, 2007
    Mantancherry Palace - Kochi


    This was an interesting place to visit and a must see if only to see the leftovers from the Dutch colonial days!
    There was a small fee to get into Mantancherry palace, it was not much and to see inside was pretty cool. I don't remember being allowed to take any photos inside though.
    The grounds were pretty and the most memorable thing about here for me was a man outside trying to sell me 200 Marlboro Ciggies for a few hundred Rupees and not taking no for an answer!!!

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Dutch Palace

    by illumina Updated Dec 18, 2010

    Mattancherry Palace, also known as the Dutch Palace, was actually originally built by the Portuguese, and was presented to the Raja of Cochin in 1555. It was renovated by the Dutch upon their capture of Fort Kochi in 1663, and this is what probably gave it its popular name.

    In 1951, Mattancherry Palace was restored and declared a centrally protected monument, and was undergoing further restoration by the Archaeological Survey of India when I was there in 2009.

    It is noted for its beautiful murals, executed in the best tradition of Hindu temple art. The king's bedchamber is particularly beautiful, with its illustrations from the Ramayana which date to the 16th century.

    Entrance to the palace costs a mere 2 INR. Photography inside is forbidden, but see the excellent video from Kerala tourism (link below).

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    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Skibbe's Profile Photo

    Mattancheri Palace

    by Skibbe Written Feb 2, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Exterior of the palace

    Built by the Portugese in 1557, it now houses a museum with impressive, faded murals of Hindu legends as well as royal palanquins, gowns and furniture. Sometimes called the Dutch Palace.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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