Gwalior Things to Do

  • Sasbahu temple from the 10th century
    Sasbahu temple from the 10th century
    by cimicak
  • On outer walls at Urvai gate
    On outer walls at Urvai gate
    by cimicak
  • Eastern part of M-S-Palace + way to Gwalior Gate
    Eastern part of M-S-Palace + way to...
    by cimicak

Most Recent Things to Do in Gwalior

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    Teli Ka Madir

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Written Aug 8, 2007

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    Teli Ka Madir
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    This is a 11th century 70 feet high temple. The temple was probably known as the Telengana temple. It has a South Indian influence on its architecture especially on the roof, which is Dravadian, though it's facade remains Indo-Ayran.

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    Sas Bahu Ka Madir

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Written Aug 8, 2007

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    Sas Bahu Ka Madir
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    This is a 9th century temple. The Sas-Bahu temple was probably called the Shashtra Bahu (another name for Vishnu) temple. "The smaller one close to it was perhaps a Shiva temple, but over the years this pair of temples whose carvings can be compared to any of the great temples of India came to be known as the "Sas-Bahu temples". In local language Hindi sas means mother-in-law and bahu means daughter-in-law.

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    Jai Vilas Palace Museum

    by RAJASTHANBYCAR Written Aug 8, 2007

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    This beautiful pure white edifice patterned on the style of the 'Palais de Versailles' in France combines Tuscan, Italian and Corinthian styles of architecture. The palace has been partly converted into a museum for Royal memorabilia. The rest of the part is the residence of Madhav Rao Scindia. The royal Durbar Hall is a magnificent structure and taking support only from columns on four sides. It also has the largest single piece carpet woven right there in the hall by 12 weavers who took 13 years to complete it. The ceiling of the Hall has a pair of the largest crystal chandeliers in the world which were built in Belgium and bought in Paris each weigh 3.5 tones. The banquet hall below has the famous Royal Gwalior silver train, which is infect, a liquor serving trolley.

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    Museum - Durbar Hall

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 9, 2007

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    This is the museums pièce de résistance as far as the rooms are concerned. The first thing that strikes you about the Durbar Hall is its two huge Belgian crystal chandeliers. They each weigh 3.5 tonnes, are 12.5m (41ft) high and hold 248 candles and are the world's largest. It is said that eight elephants were suspended from the ceiling in order to check that it could cope with the weight. As well as the chandeliers, the Durbar Hall features the largest carpet in Asia which took 12 weavers 13 years to complete. The whole hall is said to have been painted with some 58kg of gold paint.

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    Museum - Silver train

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 9, 2007

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    This is the extra-ordinary silver mechanical toy train that used to carry liqueurs and cigars in decanters on its very own track around the dining table. If you lifted the decanters out then the train would stop. If you placed them back again it would start again. I was told that the silver is from England.

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    Museum - Dining room

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 9, 2007

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    The dining room is located under the Durbar Hall and features two very long dining tables, a room for traditional India dining (i.e. eating on the floor) and a large cabinet full of English silver and china.

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    Museum - Maharaja Madhavrao Scindia room

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007

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    After walking around the first few rooms of the museum, I had to admit that I wasn't that impressed. They were dark, smelt funny and needed work doing to them but then I climbed a staircase and everything changed. Beautifully painted and guilded rooms with columns, 19th century tiles and marble. The first large room is dedicated to the previous Maharaja, Madhavrao Scindia (1945–2001), who died in a plane crash, with exhibits such as some of his personal belongings like his cricket bats, (he was President of the Board of Control for Cricket in India from 1990 to 1993), and golf clubs, photo's and his private desk.

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    Jai Vilas Palace

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007

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    This palace was built for the ruling Maharaja's of Gwalior - the Scindia's in the late 19th century by his architect, Colonel Sir Michael Filose. It is built on the style of the Palais de Versailles in France and combines Tuscan, Italian and Corinthian styles of architecture. It is still the residence of the Scindia family and part of it has been turned into a museum which houses many obscure items such as a silver train used to carry liqueurs along a track around the dining table and Belgian cut-glass furniture. The highlight of the rooms is the Durbar Hall which features the world's largest crystal chandeliers that each weigh 3.5 tonnes each and are 12.5m (41ft) high and the largest carpet in Asia. More photo's can be found in one of my travelogues.

    Open: 9.30am-5.30pm Thu-Tues. Admission: Rs200 for foreigners & Rs30 for stills camera.

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    Park

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007

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    This attractive park lies to the north of the Jai Vilas Palace but I don't know its name. There's a statue of Gandhi with a strange permanent ladder leading up to him from the front which, I presume, is so that people can decorate him with flowers. The park features nice borders and well kept lawns plus neat rows palm trees along fountains. If you enter into the park from the north, there's a very nice sort of summer palace pavilion in front of a man-made pool on the left as you walk towards the palace gates. The way into the Jai Vilas Palace is from the west through an unusal looking gatehouse.

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    Chhatri of Lakshmi Bai

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007

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    This memorial is located along MLB Road, north of the Jai Vilas Palace. It is dedicated to Lakshmi Bai (1828-58), the queen of the Maratha-ruled princely state of Jhansi. She was one of the leading figures of the Indian rebellion of 1857 and a symbol of resistance to British rule in India.

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    Tomb children

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007
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    I had just entered inside the gardens of the Tombs of Mohammed Gaus & Tansen (where people were lying back on the grass) when a group of kids came over from the right up to the fence that stopped them coming further to me. They wanted their picture taken, (as most kids in India do), so I took one of them and showed it to them on my camera's small screen. They loved seeing themselves even though it was very small. They then started to come round the fence and I was soon inundated with them all around me shouting, jumping and screaming at me to take another. I just wanted to get away from them all as all of this was causing a scene and people who had not already seen me, had now seen me for sure. I carried on walking with a group of about 10 kids still around me and luckily a young lad started talking to me and we got talking about IT as he was studying to become a software developer. We sat down together and chatted and after about 10 minutes the kids had cleared off and were replaced by a small group of guys who were just curious to hear what we were talking about.

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    Tombs of Mohammed Gaus & Tansen

    by Willettsworld Updated Jun 7, 2007
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    These tombs are located in the old city just off Fort Road which takes you to the first entrance gate of the fort. The Tomb of Mohammed Gaus, who was an Afghan Prince turned sufi saint and who played a key role in Babur's acquistion of the fort, is a fine example of early Mughal architecture. It has hexagonal towers on each corner and a large central dome which was once covered with glazed blue tiles. Set around all four sides are magnificent stone latticework screens.

    The tomb of Tansen is where the famous singer lies. Miyan Tansen (1506–1589) is believed to have been the greatest North Indian musician of all time. He was so good that he was one of Emperor Akbar's "nine jewels" of his court. His tomb is small and is built in the early Mughal architectural style. There is a tamarind tree near the tomb. It is believed that Tansen got his fabulous voice after eating leaves of this tree so people visiting his tomb also eat these leaves.

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    State Archaeological Museum

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007
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    The State Archaeological Museum is located in the 15th century Gujari Mahal at the foot of the hill on which the fort is situated. The museum houses mostly Hindu, Buddhist and Jain stone sculptures that date back to the 1st century AD as well as coins, miniature paintings, and weapons and armoury held in what looked like an underground bunker. More pictures can be found in one of my travelogues.

    Open: 10am-5pm Tue-Sun. Closed Mondays. Admission: Rs30 for foreigners & Rs20 for stills camera.

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    Gujari Mahal

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007
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    The 15th century Gujari Mahal is a monument to the love of Raja Man Singh for his Gujar queen, Mrignayani. After he had wooed and won her, Mrignayani demanded a separate palace with a constant water supply from the River Rai. Today, the palace is the host for the State Archaeological Museum.

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    Chatarbhuj Mandir

    by Willettsworld Written Jun 7, 2007

    I think this is the Chatarbhuj Mandir but I'm not too sure! There's a larger white temple a little further down the path which could be it as well! Anyway, the shrine is dedicated to Vishnu, is also known as the Temple of the Four-Armed and was built in 876 AD. The other possibility is that it's the Hindu Temple dedicated to the hermit Gwalipa, after whom the fort and town is named.

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