Ajanta Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Things to Do
    by anilpradhanshillong
  • Things to Do
    by anilpradhanshillong

Best Rated Things to Do in Ajanta

  • AKHTARSAYYAD's Profile Photo

    MUst see cave which have the sleeping Lord Budha.

    by AKHTARSAYYAD Written Feb 6, 2009

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    WE must have to see the last cave of the Ajanta caves group .In which the lord Budha is sleeping very calmly .This type of stone carving is no where in the world ..!
    Everywhere u can see the Sitting Budha in the world but such type of sclupter is no where.
    The smile on the face of the Budha is really amazing and unbeleiveable that it is a stone ...I always feel that this is a true .Lord is getting rest.

    Sleeping Lord Budha.
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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Rediscovered jungle beauty!

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Apr 26, 2010

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    The Ajanta Caves, also an UNESCO World Heritage Site, are older than their twin (Ellora Caves), dating from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD. The fall of the caves of Ajanta are actually due to Ellora and were actually forgotten about until a British hunter literally stumbled across them in 1819. The jungle had reclaimed them but the beautiful paintings had been fantastically preserved. The caves are stunningly set in a horseshoe around a gorge which, after the monsoon has waterfalls to boot - would imagine that is an awesome time to view here.

    You must take an "eco bus" to the site of the caves. Now, I am taking a wild leap here and assuming that these chugging, old buses are called "eco" because, by using them they are limiting thevolume of traffic... The buses are relatively regular but be advised, when they are due to leave people emerged out of the blue to take them! You pay the conductor (7INR per person) on the bus and the fare is one way.

    There are many steps to climb at Anjanta which are tiresome in the blanket of heat. You can, should you so wish, hire a chair with 4 carriers and pretend you are modern day Maharaja. One of my children was very ill so I actually did pay for one for him. It was either that or giving him a piggy back which I certainly did not fancy! I regretted it in as much as the chair carriers are in a hurry to get around the site so that they can get their next ride. I gave them what I think was a good tip but they started shouting at me demanding I give them that each (on top of the payment for the chair) - it niggled me!

    NB flash photography is not allowed.
    At the time of my visit (April 2010) all caves were open to the public but the rumour is that they are going to be closing some off to preserve the artworks.

    The paintings are quite remarkable BUT my advice is if you intend to visit both the Ellora and the Ajanta caves, to visit Ajanta first as Ellora really are superior!

    as with all sites in India there is one fee for Indians and another for visitors!
    and as all sites in India, anybody hanging around the cave who starts "casually" talking to you about the cave(s)... is a guide official or unofficial and is after baksheesh!

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Cave Murals

    by kenmerk Written Jan 8, 2005

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    The real attraction at Ajanta are the beautiful and prolific cave wall murals here. These paintings are remarkably preserved, especially considering the fact that they are between 1400 to 2200 years old.

    Excuse the slightly blurry photos, as no flash allowed inside the caves. If you get the chance, though try browsing on the web for some professional photos to see how colourful these cave murals really are....

    Elephant Wall Moral at Ajanta...

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  • GenuinelyCurious's Profile Photo

    Wonderful artistic display of ancient religion

    by GenuinelyCurious Written Apr 30, 2008

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    The Ajora and Ellanta caves take quite a long time to drive to. I was told they are accessible by air. The question is – is the trip worth it? The cave system has over a dozen different subjects and some are in very good shape.

    The most impressive of these is a large Ganesh temple that was carved literally from the top down. The impressive extent of the display is intricate and multi-leveled, including stairwells, statues and a large temple structure. It is a testament to both engineering and artistry.

    Unless you are a real lover of engineering and art, or you have loads of time, these attractions may not be worth the time and effort. It was on our way and so worth the stop, but I’m not convinced it’s a great destination in and of itself.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Ajanta Caves

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    The world famous Buddhist caves at Ajanta, also a World Heritage site, lie around 100km (60 miles) to the northeast of Aurangabad. The splendid caves of Ajanta feature 30 rock cut caves that date back to 2nd century B.C. They lie in a large horseshoe-shaped escarpment overlooking the narrow Waghora river gorge. On display are exquisite paintings (some of the earliest Buddhist paintings found in India) and sculptures depicting Buddha's life, halls and monasteries. By AD 480 the caves at Ajanta were abandoned. During the next 1300 years the jungle grew back and the caves were hidden, unvisited and undisturbed until the Spring of 1819 when a British officer in the Madras army entered the steep gorge on the trail of a tiger.

    The caves of Ajanta can be classified into two distinct phases: the earlier Hinayana phase (I), in which the Buddha was worshipped only in the form of certain symbols; and the later Mahayana phase (II), in which the Buddha was worshipped in his physical form.

    Phase I: 2nd century BC to 1st century BC. Caves 9 & 10: Chaitya Halls or shrines.
    Caves 12 & 13: Viharas or monasteries.

    Phase II: 5th century AD to 6th century AD.
    Caves 19, 26 & 29: Chaitya Halls or shrines.

    Caves 1-7,11,14-18, 20-25, 27 & 28: Viharas or monasteries.

    Unfinished Caves: 3, 5, 8, 23-25. 28 & 29.

    Admission: Rs250.

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  • bkarjee's Profile Photo

    Ajanta Caves

    by bkarjee Written Apr 20, 2006

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    Ajanta Caves are located in Aurangabad distt of Maharashtra State in Western India and is easily accessible from Mumbai by bus, train, flights. Aurangabad can be a base for various middle age and prehistoric Historical attractions, chief among them being Ajanta Caves, Ellora Caves, Daulatabad Fort, Bibi Ka Makbara (replica of Taj Mahal, but made by King Auranjeb-poor cousin of Taj Mahal, but worth seeing).
    Ajanta Caves are pre historic caves located more than 100 KMs north east of Aurangabad and is famous for rock paintings, very well preserved. They depict Buddhist history.

    Ajanta Caves
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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Viewpoint

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    I took a tour via a car which I shared with an American guy staying at my hotel in Aurangabad and when we neared the caves, our driver asked us if we wanted to go to the viewpoint car park that is on top of a hill that overlooks the caves or take a bus, 5km to another car park near the caves entrance. We opted for the viewpoint option which turned out to be a good choice as we just walked down from the car park to the caves via a bridge that crossed over the river. The only thing was, was that we had to walk all the way back up again in order to get back to the car! Anyway, if you want to have a good panoramic view of the caves, then the viewpoint is the place to do it. BTW, it was from here that John Smith, a British army officer, first glimpsed the caves while on a hunting expedition in 1819.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 1

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    This is one of the finest monasteries at Ajanta. Graciously posed Bodhisattvas with elaborate head-dresses flank the antechamber doorway. On its either side are two of the best known murals - Bodhisattva Padmapani holding a lotus (left) and Bodhisattva Vajrapani holding a thunderbolt (right) accompanied by attendants, divine musicians and flying figures. The left wall of the antechamber depicts the assault and temptation by Mara, the god of passion, and on the right wall is the dark princess being offered lotuses by a lady. In the shrine, the Buddha is seen in the teaching position. Under his throne appears the Wheel of Life. The left wall of the hall shows scenes from the Mahajanaka Jataka. To the right of the rear wall are episodes from the Champeyya Jataka.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 2

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    This cave is remarkable for the painted ceiling with large medallions, delicate bands of lotus flowers, scroll work and abstract geometric patterns. Episodes connected with the birth of the Buddha such as the dream of his mother Maya, its interpretation by the priests and the birth of Gautama occupy the left wall. Next to this is a representation of the Miracle of Shravasti when the Buddha manifested himself in a thousand forms.

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    Cave 4

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    Planned on a grandiose scale, but never completed. this is the largest monastery at Ajanta it has a central doorway embellished with guardians, flying figures, maidens clutching trees and also images of the Buddha and Ganas, or dwarfs, with garlands. Six gigantic standing figures of the Buddha are carved in the walls of the antechamber.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 6

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    Excavated on two levels, it has a splendidly carved entrance. The lower hall has 16 octagonal columns. In the shrine is the seated Buddha accompanied by standing Buddha’s. The upper hall has only one painting, depicting the gift by a monk.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 10

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    Probably the earliest cave excavated at Ajanta. The paintings, though largely obliterated, reveal a royal personage accompanied by soldiers, musicians and dancers, worshipping the Bodhi Tree and the Stupa. Also of interest are the Jataka tales on the right wall.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 16

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    This is one of the finest monasteries at Ajanta. It has an inscription of Varahadevaa minister of king Harisena. The ceiling of the front aisle replicates wooden beams, the ends being supported by Ganas, musicians and flying couples. The teaching Buddha is seated on a lion-throne. To his left is the Dying Princess (the bride of Buddha's cousin Nanda). On the right wall is the painting of Siddhartha (later the Buddha) using the bow and the Buddha begging for alms from his wife and son. On the front wall of the hall are two scenes from the Jataka tales in which the Bodhisattva appears as an elephant and as a wise judge, settling a dispute between two women claiming motherhood of the same child.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 17

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    The greatest number of wall-paintings are preserved in this cave. The doorway shows a row of eight Buddha’s surrounded by female guardians, river goddesses, scroll work and lotus petals. On the left side wall of the verandah is the unusual composition of the Wheel of Life displaying all of creation. The paintings in the hall illustrate the Jataka tales.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cave 19

    by Willettsworld Written Sep 19, 2009

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    One of the most perfectly executed rock-cut Chaityas with elaborately carved interiors. Seated Buddha figures as well as riders, flying figures, hermits and musicians adorn the column capitals. Two rows of richly decorated columns lead up to the standing Buddha. The shrine has a triple stone umbrella above the monolithic Stupa.

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